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Mary S. Price

For more information about the activities, publications, and membership benefits, contact Master Gardeners International, P.O. Box 526, Falls Church VA 22040-0526; telephone 703.241.3769; fax 703.241.8625; e-mail mgic@capaccess.org .

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Mary Hockenberry Meyer

88 WORKSHOP 12 (Abstr. 685) Junior Master Gardener Programs Tuesday, 25 July, 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

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Bryn Takle, Cynthia Haynes and Denny Schrock

The Master Gardener program was launched in Washington State in 1972 and has been established in all 50 states, Washington, DC, and several international locations. The program is based on three core concepts: helping local cooperative extension

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Kerrie B. Badertscher

Oral Session 2— Consumer Horticulture & Master Gardeners 27 July 2006, 2:00–3:30 p.m. Nottoway Moderator: Richard Durham

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Linda McMahan

Oral Session 2— Consumer Horticulture & Master Gardeners 27 July 2006, 2:00–3:30 p.m. Nottoway Moderator: Richard Durham

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Mary Hockenberry Meyer, Cynthia Haynes, Denise Ellsworth, Sarah Ellis Williams, Celeste Welty and Karen Jeannette

Horticulture IPM Working Group developed an online learning module entitled, “Introduction to Diagnostics for Master Gardener Volunteers: Approaches to Plant Pest Diagnosis.” The goal of the module was to increase EMG confidence and knowledge in the diagnostic

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Lelia S. Kelly and Julie Sexton

Poster Session 29— Consumer Horticulture and Master Gardeners 29 July 2006, 1:15–2:00 p.m.

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Diane Relf and Alan McDaniel

A survey of Virginia Master Gardeners (N = 188) indicates that answering individual questions and providing educational programs designed to change individuals' behavior were equally important and ranked as number 1 priority for volunteer activity. In terms of training and management, local training programs had the highest importance ranking, with participation in local associations ranking second in importance. Social activities had the lowest importance. Annual training was viewed as primarily the agents' responsibility. However, daily man-agement, record keeping, and related activities were viewed as Master Gardener responsibilities in cooperation with agents.

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Ann Marie VanDerZanden, Bob Rost and Rick Eckel

100 ORAL SESSION 20 Abstr. 565–571) Cross-commodity: Undergraduate Education/Master Gardeners Tuesday, 25 July, 2:00–4:00 p.m

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Larry Stouse and Charles Marr

Master Gardeners are volunteers who assist local cooperative extension horticulture and related program efforts by receiving training and conducting educational activities and projects. Participants generally receive training and volunteer within a 1-year period. The emphasis has shifted to longer retention of trained, experienced Master Gardeners. There are several advantages in retaining volunteers. Volunteers with established knowledge who “know the ropes” serve as spokespersons for the program to recruit additional volunteers and as mentors for new class members. Since 1980, Master Gardeners in Johnson County, Ran., have served the 300,000 population base of the southwestern Kansas City suburban area through the county extension horticulture program. About 35% of the members of the first classes are still active volunteer participants after 10 years. Retention is encouraged by emphasizing that volunteer time is an opportunity for continued learning, rather than a “payback” for training received. An advisory board and committee structure encourages “ownership” of the program, and an advanced training program is offered to retained volunteers. Developing ideas for quality volunteer activities is continuously stressed. As new volunteers start the program, their abilities and skills in nonhorticultural areas that may be useful are assessed, such as woodworking, photography, speaking, leadership, and art. Applicants are screened to limit class size to 20 to 25 participants.