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Alan W. Meerow, Tomás Ayala-Silva, and Brian M. Irish

. (Lythraceae). Gard. Bull. Straits Settlem. (Singapore) 24:185–335 Gilman, E.F. Watson, D.G. 1993 Lagerstroemia speciosa , Queens crape-myrtle Florida Cooperative Extension Service Factsheet ST-340. University of Florida. p. 3 Royal Horticultural Society 1995

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Margaret R. Pooler

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Neil O. Anderson and Peter D. Ascher

Male and female fertility, seed germination, and progeny fertility were used to determine cultivar fertility in species of Lythrum. One short-, 11 mid-, and six long-styled cultivars were included in this study. Duplicates of several cultivars from different nurseries and three unknown cultivars from Minnesota gardens were also collected. Plants from 17 Minnesota and one Wisconsin population of L. salicaria served as fertile male and/or female testers. Pollen stainability (usually 100%) showed low levels of male gamete abortion. Pollen size within and among anther type varied widely; possible 2n gametes were present in primarily the short- and mid-anther morphs. Seed production per capsule from legitimate cross-pollinations, using cultivars as male parents with Minnesota or Wisconsin female testers, averaged 48 ± 36 across style morphs. Cultivars differed as males, as did anther morphs. With female fertility tests, seed set per capsule ranged from zero to 152 and averaged 54 ± 40 in legitimate pollinations (i.e., pollinations between stamen and styles of the same length). Seed set for other crosses showed similar trends. Only `Morden Gleam' produced no seed with all legitimate pollinations, although illegitimate selfs or interspecific crosses produced seed. Seed from legitimate crosses of L. salicaria × cultivars had 30% to 100% germination. Common male and female parents within each legitimate crossing group were not significantly different. This study showed that the cultivars are highly fertile when used as male or female parents with wild purple loosestrife, native species (L. alatum Pursh.), or other cultivars. Thus, cultivars grown in gardens could serve as pollen or seed sources for the continued spread of purple loosestrife. The implications of cultivar fertility, especially interspecific F1 hybrids, is discussed in relation to the spread of noxious weeds in wetlands.

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Neil O. Anderson and Peter D. Ascher

Lythrum species (Lythraceae), found both in the Old and New Worlds, possess heterostyly (macroscopic differences in anther and style lengths). SI is linked with heterostyly in tristylous L. salicaria, allowing for visual identification of compatibility relationships. Five Minnesota populations of distylous L. alatum (short & long styles/anthers) were examined for fertility and linkage between distyly and SI. Pollen was not inhibited from germination, stigmatic penetration, or stylar growth in compatible crosses. Average cross-compatible seed set for each population was 7-33 seeds/capsule for short- and 27-69 for long-styled plants. With the exception of the Iron Horse Prairie population, there were no significant differences in mean seed set/capsule between genotypes, style morphs, or their interaction for compatible crosses. Zero self seed set predominated, although 0.8±1.8 seeds/capsule were produced by short styles and 1.2 ±2.3 by long styles from Iron Horse Prairie. In those individuals that were SI, pollen tube growth was inhibited following self pollinations.

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Cecil Pounders, Tim Rinehart, and Hamidou Sakhanokho

than the currently accepted sectional groupings. Chromosome counts reported for Lagerstroemia species are often confusing. This is partly the result of small chromosome size and dysploidy within genera of the Lythraceae ( Graham and Cavalcanti, 2001

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Shu’an Wang, Rutong Yang, Peng Wang, Qing Wang, Linfang Li, Ya Li, and Zengfang Yin

Crape myrtle ( Lagerstroemia indica ), a member of the family Lythraceae, originated in China and historical records of its cultivation in the country date back to 1700 years ago, well before its cultivation in other areas in the world ( Zhang, 1991

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Neil O. Anderson

morph frequencies in Minnesota populations of Lythrum (Lythraceae). I. Distylous L. alatum Pursh Plant Cell Incompatibility Nwsl. 25 4 9 Anderson, N.O. Ascher, P.D. 1994 Erosion of style/anther length integrity in introgressive Lythrum hybrids, p

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Xinwang Wang, Phillip A. Wadl, Cecil Pounders, Robert N. Trigiano, Raul I. Cabrera, Brian E. Scheffler, Margaret Pooler, and Timothy A. Rinehart

number of x = 8 for family Lythraceae J. St.-Hil. nomen conservandum ( Raven, 1975 ; Tobe et al., 1986 ). Bowden (1945) and Guha (1972) report 2n = 50 for L. indica , whereas Ali (1977) reports 2n = 48. Repeated interspecific hybridizations among

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Wei Zhou, Hong Wang, De-Zhu Li, Jun-Bo Yang, and Wei Zhou

Development and characterization of microsatellite markers for a mangrove tree species Sonneratia caseolaris (L.) Engler (Lythraceae sensu lato ) Conserv. Genet. 9 957 959 Clarke, K.R. Gorley, R.N. 2001 PRIMER version

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Xinwang Wang, Deborah Dean, Phillip Wadl, Denita Hadziabdic, Brian Scheffler, Timothy Rinehart, Raul Cabrera, and Robert Trigiano

spinosa (L.) Skeels] endemic to Morocco Theor. Appl. Genet. 92 832 839 Furtado, C.X. Srisuko, M. 1969 A revision of Lagerstroemia indica L. (Lythraceae) Garden Bull. (Singapore) 24 185 334