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Raul I. Cabrera, James A. Reinert and Cynthia B. McKenney

The genus Lagerstroemia L. is native to Southeast Asia and comprises between 50 and 80 species, most of which are concentrated in tropical latitudes ( Cabrera, 2004 ; Egolf and Andrick, 1978 ; Pooler, 2003 ). Of these, however, less than 10

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Xinwang Wang, Deborah Dean, Phillip Wadl, Denita Hadziabdic, Brian Scheffler, Timothy Rinehart, Raul Cabrera and Robert Trigiano

The genus Lagerstroemia L. contains shrubs or trees that are primarily native to tropical regions of southeastern Asia and Indo-Malaysia ( Furtado and Srisuko, 1969 ), which are cultivated, and in some cases naturalized, in temperate and

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Cecil Pounders, Tim Rinehart and Hamidou Sakhanokho

Most of the 56 ( Furtado and Srisuko, 1969 ) to 80 ( Cabrera, 2004 ) species within the genus Lagerstroemia are tropical plants with little cold hardiness. They generally have small white to lavender flowers with little ornamental appeal and are

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Xiaoming Wang, Jianjun Chen, Huijie Zeng, Zhongquan Qiao, Yongxin Li, Neng Cai and Xiangying Wang

Lagerstroemia indica L., commonly referred to as crape myrtle or crepe flower, is an upright, wide-spreading, deciduous shrub or small tree in the loosestrife family Lythraceae. It is native to the Himalayas through southern China, Southeast Asia

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James M. Rawson and Richard L. Harkess

Lagerstroemia has potential for development as a potted florist crop for early spring sales. The number and timing of pinching or number of liners per container were examined as a means of developing a more compact plant that is in proportion to the container. On 20 July 1996, either one or three rooted liners of Lagerstroemia `Victor' or `Zuni' were planted into 1500-ml (15 cm in diameter) containers in a pine bark: peat moss (3:1 v/v) substrate amended with 6 kg·m–3 MicroMax plus (Scotts Company, Inc., Marysville, Ohio). The plants were topdressed with 10 g SierraBlen 17–6–12 (Scotts Company, Inc., Marysville, Ohio) slow-release fertilizer. The liners received 0, 1, 2, 3, or 4 pinches and were pinched in a complete factorial 0, 2, 4, and 6 weeks after potting. There were 32 pinching treatments with 5 replications. The plants were grown outside until 30 Sept. 1996, when they were moved into a greenhouse. Plant height, width, and a visual rating were collected 13 Nov. 1996. There was no significant difference in plant size or visual rating of `Victor' regardless of the number or timing of pinches or of the number of liners per pot. `Zuni' had significantly the best visual ratings and largest size when grown with three liners but the timing and number of pinches had no significant effect. `Victor' is a dwarf cultivar growing to only 1 m in the landscape while `Zuni' is a semi-dwarf, growing to 2.7 m.

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Cecil Pounders, Brian E. Scheffler and Timothy A. Rinehart

Species of the genus Lagerstroemia L., commonly referred to as crapemyrtles, are native to Southeast Asia along with Indo-Malaysia and have long been cultivated for timber and as ornamentals. Confusion exists on the exact number of crapemyrtle

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Cecil T. Pounders and Hamidou F. Sakhanokho

Crape myrtles ( Lagerstroemia L.) are endemic to Asia (southern China, southeast Asia, and Japan) where they have been cultivated for timber and as major flowering ornamental plants for ≥1500 years ( Huxley, 1992 ; Pooler, 2006 ; Pounders et al

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Patricia R. Knight, John M. Anderson, Wayne McLaurin and Christine Coker

Lagerstroemia indica ×fauriei `Tonto' and `Sioux' were planted in Mar. 1995. All other cultivars were planted in Oct. 1985. Plants were planted into a Ruston sandy loam on a 12 × 12 ft (3.7 × 3.7 m) spacing. Trees were pruned to develop multiple trunks. Trees are pruned annually in winter to remove any limbs smaller than 0.6 cm in diameter. Pruning cuts are made 6–8 in (15.2–20.3 cm) above prior cuts. Severe pruning is performed every 5 years. Trees were evaluated at 2-week intervals during the flowering season to determine total length of flowering and duration of good to superior flowering. Growth indices (height + width + perpendicular width)/3 were recorded after plants were dormant. Total days of flowering and floral display (0–5 with 0 representing no flowers and 5 representing superior flowering) were rated. `Muskogee' had the greatest growth index after the 2004 growing season. `Seminole' had the least. However, `Seminole' had the greatest number of flowering days. `Biloxi' had the fewest flowering days. `Tonto' had the most good to superior flowering days, while `Tuskegee' and `Muskogee' had the fewest. In 2005, `Muskogee' again had the greatest growth index, while `Sioux' had the least. `Yuma' and `Seminole' had the greatest number of flowering days, and `Biloxi' again had the fewest. `Tonto' again had the most good to superior flowering days, while `Biloxi' and `Acoma' had the fewest.

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Margaret R. Pooler

Many popular crapemyrtle (Lagerstroemia L.) cultivars grown in the United States are interspecific hybrids between L. indica L. and L. fauriei Koehne. The 22 hybrid cultivars released from the U.S. National Arboretum contain primarily genetic material from L. fauriei PI 237884. Examining the genetic diversity ofL. fauriei specimens in the U.S. is valuable because of the historical and economic significance of the species, the increasing interest it is receiving as a source of new cultivars, and its threatened status in the wild. Our objectives were to examine molecular genetic diversity among L. fauriei accessions using Randomly Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphisms (AFLP) markers. Our results indicate: 1) RAPD and AFLP markers are generally consistent in the genetic relationships that they suggest; 2) the L. fauriei germplasm we examined falls into at least three distinct clusters; and 3) the genetic base of cultivated Lagerstroemia could be broadened significantly by incorporating some of this more diverse L. fauriei germplasm into breeding programs.

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James M. Rawson and Richard L. Harkess

Three experiments were conducted using Lagerstroemia `Victor' and `Zuni', one on pinching, another on photoperiod, and the third with fertilizer rates. Liners were potted with either one or three liners per container. In the pinching experiment, treatments were 0, 1, 2, 3, or 4 pinches at 0, 2, 4, or 6 weeks after planting. In the photoperiod experiment the plants were exposed to 0, 4, 8, or 12 weeks of short days before being moved to long days. In the fertilizer experiment the plants were fertilized at 0, 200, 400, 600, or 800 mg.L-1 nitrogen from 20-10-20 liquid feed and 0 or 6 g per container of 15-11-13 slow-release fertilizer. For both `Victor' and `Zuni', three liners per container resulted in plants that were wider and shorter than those with only one liner. Neither timing nor number of pinches significantly affected plant size. Short days prevented vegetative growth and floral development in both cultivars. `Victor' grew and flowered best after receiving 8 weeks of short days before moving to long days. `Zuni' grew and flowered best when moved directly to long days after potting. Both `Victor' and `Zuni' grew best when receiving either 200 mg·L-1 or 6 g of slow-release fertilizer.