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Brian A. Kahn and William G. McGlynn

, making harvest timing more difficult. The problem was exacerbated in 2004 when harvest of both ‘Blue Lake 274’ and ‘Capricorn’ was delayed 48 h by heavy rain. Color evaluation. The results for L* values followed the expected pattern; the cooked beans

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P.M.A. Toivonen and C.R. Hampson

storage. Lightness of the cut surface was measured on the day of cutting (day 0) and after 3 weeks of storage at 5 °C. Lightness was quantified using a Minolta chroma-meter (CR300; Minolta, Ramsey, NJ) using the L * values of the Commision Internationale

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Juan C. Díaz-Pérez, Dan MacLean, Smiljana Goreta, Sarah Workman, Erick Smith, Harwinder Singh Sidhu, Gunawati Gunawan, Anthony Bateman, Jesús Bautista, William Lovett, Maja Jukić Špika, Gvozden Dumičić, and Mira Radunić

fruit rind and aril color. Three color readings were performed per fruit rind and fruit aril. Color was measured as L*, a*, and b*. Lightness (L* value) ranged from 0 (white) to 100 (black); a* ranged from −a (green) to + a (red); and b* ranged from −b

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Lauren E. Deans, Irene E. Palmer, Darren H. Touchell, and Thomas G. Ranney

differences were not different between ‘David Ramsey’ diploids and tetraploids. The L* value, which represents relative lightness (0 = black; 100 = white), showed that tetraploid ‘MAK20’ was darker than the diploid. The a* CIELAB parameter is the red

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Mervyn C. D'Souza, Morris Ingle, and Suman Singha

Chromaticity values (L*, a*, b*) of `Rome Beauty' apples (Malus domestics) were measured at weekly intervals during maturation periods in 1988 and 1989. Chromaticity was measured using a Minolta Chroma Meter CR-200b calorimeter on four quadrants of the fruit at locations midway between the stem and calyx ends. The apples continued to develop red color through the maturation period. After storage, the peel areas where chromaticity was measured were evaluated for scald intensity. The L* value at harvest was correlated positively with scald intensity, while the a* value was correlated negatively. An equation has been developed to describe the relationship between chromaticity values at harvest and scald intensity after storage.

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Gene Lester and Krista C. Shellie

Physicochemical and sensory attributes of fully mature honey dew melon (Cucumis melo L. var. inodorus Naud.) fruits were evaluated 10 days after storage for eight commercial cultivars grown in two locations. Cultivars varied in degree of pref- erence expressed by panelists' ratings for overall fruit preference, flavor, and shape and for physicochemical measurements of soluble solids concentration (SSC), flesh firmness, and fruit weight. The sensory attribute that correlated most strongly with overall fruit preference was fruit flavor (r = 0.97). The whiteness of epidermal tissue (rind L value) and SSC correlated more highly with overall fruit preference (r = 0.54 and r = 0.52, respectively) than other physicochemical attributes, such as fruit firm- ness (r = -0.24) and fruit weight (r = -0.12). Epidermal L value correlated more strongly with panelists' ratings for fruit shape (r = 0.69) than with fruit flavor (r = 0.35), but SSC correlated more strongly with fruit flavor (r = 0.61) than with fruit shape (r = 0.30). Superior honey dew melon quality at harvest was associated with high SSC, white epidermal tissue, and round fruit shape.

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Louise Ferguson, Hesham Gawad, G. Steven Sibbett, Mark Freeman, and James J. Hatakeda

A stepwise multiple regression analysis, using payment by processors as the dependent variable (Y) and numerous physical and chemical characteristics as the independent variables (X), demonstrated that the primary factor determining `Manzanillo' olive (Olea europaea L.) value at harvest was size. Optimal crop value correlated strongly with the combined percentage of standard, medium, large, and extra-large olives; R' values were 0.93***, 0.93***, and 0.42 (ns) in 1984, 1985, and 1986, respectively. As the harvest season progressed, increased percentages of olives within these size classifications, not weight increases of individual olives within the size categories, produced the increase in value. Individual olives within size categories maintained the same weight through the harvest season, regardless of tree crop load. The best criterion for predicting optimal harvest time “is the total percentage of standard, medium, large, and extra-large olives.

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Mervyn C. D'Souza, Morris Ingle, and Suman Singha

Lycopene is the predominant carotenoid pigment in tomatoes and primarily responsible for red color. Spectrophotometric procedures for lycopene evaluation although accurate are time consuming and destructive. The objective of this study was to relate chromaticity values (L*,a*,b*) measured using a Minolta Chroma Meter CR-200b portable tristimulus calorimeter with lycopene concentrations in the pericarp of 'Celebrity', 'Mountain Delight' and 'Early Pick' tomatoes. Fruit were selected to encompass varying maturities from green to red ripe and were obtained from a commercial source. Lycopene from individual skin disks or pericarp plugs corresponding to each location of color measurement was extracted in acetone and measured spectrophotometrically at 503 nm. The L* value (a measure of lightness) or a* value (a measure of redness) was determined to be well correlated with lycopene concentration in all 3 cultivars. The linear regression of the lycopene concentration on the ratio of (a*/b*) provided the best R for all cultivars (0.75).

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Judith Zambrano, Sagrario Briceño, Lidis Pacheco, and Clara Méndez

`Palmer' and `Keitt' mangoes (Mangifera indica L.) were treated with two commercial wax coatings. The fruit were placed in 20-liter plastic containers, stored at 5C, and 85% to 95% relative humidity. Fruit were dipped fully in 1% aqueous suspensions of Pro-long and Primafresh C (original concentration) and analyzed at 2-day intervals for 18 days, with day 0 being 24 h after harvest. The following parameters were monitored: peel and pulp color (L*, chroma, and hue), fresh weight loss, total soluble solids, and titratable acidity. Both waxes reduced the rate of loss fresh weight of mangoes as compared with uncoated fruit. No differences were found for titratable acidity and total soluble solids. Waxed fruit were lighter (higher L* values) and less intense (lower chroma values) in color than control fruits.

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K.A. Sanford, P.D. Lidster, K.B. McRae, E.D. Jackson, R.A. Lawrence, R. Stark, and R.K. Prange

Postharvest response of wild lowbush blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium Ait. and V. myrtilloides Michx.) to mechanical damage and storage temperature was studied during 2 years. Fruit weight loss and the incidence of shriveled or split berries were major components that contributed to the loss of marketable yield resulting from mechanical damage and storage temperature. Decay of berries resulted in only 1% to 2% of the total marketable fruit loss. In general, the major quality attributes (firmness, microbial growth, hue, bloom, split, and unblemished berries) deteriorated with increasing damage levels and increasing storage temperature without significant interaction. Temperature had consistent effects in both years on moisture content, soluble solids concentration, titratable acids, weight loss, shriveled and decayed berries, Hunter L values, and anthocyanin leakage, while damage level had inconsistent or no significant effect.