Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 288 items for :

  • All content x
Clear All
Free access

Yuko Yoshizawa, Kenji Sakurai, Satoru Kawaii, Masayoshi Asari, Junichi Soejima, and Noboru Murofushi

Aqueous ethanol extracts prepared from 19 apple (Malus ×domestica Borkh.) cultivars were studied to explore their antiproliferative activity. Half of them showed strong inhibition on proliferation of human leukemic HL-60 cells, while the others were weak. Total polyphenols, 1, 1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity, and total anthocyanins were measured and the results indicated that the antiproliferative activity was more strongly correlated to the polyphenols and radical scavenging activity than to the anthocyanin content. Several polyphenols in `Jonathan' were identified and quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis. Among those compounds found during HPLC, catechin and epicatechin seemed partially responsible for HL-60 antiproliferation. A careful examination on parentage of the apple cultivars tested revealed that `Jonathan' and its progeny showed high antiproliferation toward HL-60. This is the first observation about the relationship between antiproliferative activity and parentage of apples, and the information would be useful to create new apple cultivars that posses more anticancer potential.

Free access

David C. Ferree

`Jonathan'/M.26 apple (Malus domestics Borkh.) trees were root-pruned annually on two sides, 60 cm from the trunk, to a depth of 40 cm for 6 years while dormant, at bloom, or in mid-June. Root pruning reduced terminal shoot growth by ≈30% in 1985-89 with no influence in 1990. Cumulative yield was reduced by root pruning at bloom (14%) or mid-June (20%), and cumulative yield efficiency [kg·cm-2 trunk cross-sectional area) was reduced by root pruning with no difference among pruning times except in 1 year, where abundant moisture throughout the season appeared to negate the effect. The intensity of biennial bearing was reduced by root pruning with no relationships to time of pruning. Root pruning resulted in a decrease in large fruit and an increase in small fruit in 3 of the 6 years. A covariant analysis with yield showed that root pruning reduced average fruit size. Root-pruned trees produced firmer fruit with an increased soluble solids concentration and had less preharvest drop than nonpruned trees. Under severe drought conditions in 1988, root pruning reduced net photosynthesis and transpiration; supplemental water (57 liters·week-1) increased transpiration and fruit size at harvest.

Free access

Yolanta Saks, Lilian Sonego, and Ruth Ben-Arie

In `Jonathan' apples grown in Israel, the incidence of senescent breakdown after 5 months of storage at 0C was not correlated with total or water-soluble Ca content at harvest. Likewise, no other assayed component of the water-soluble or total mineral content (P, Mg, K) of the fruit pulp at harvest correlated with the disorder after storage. After storage, a general decrease in the solubility of Ca was observed. However, this decrease was not uniform in all fruit and, as a result, the correlation between water-soluble and total Ca content, which was high at harvest, diminished after storage. Water-extractable Ca from stored fruit was negatively correlated and water-soluble K/Ca was positively correlated with the incidence of senescent breakdown, whereas total Ca was not correlated.

Free access

Jonathan Frantz and Peter Ling

Oral Session 3—Floriculture 1 27 July 2006, 2:00–3:15 p.m. Oak Alley Moderator: Jonathan Frantz

Free access

Jonathan Damery and David Kopsell

-European plants. The British are fortunate to have such a quality guide of this type, designed specifically for their flora. The rest of the world can only hope that botanists in their region will take notice and aspire to create similar guides. Jonathan

Free access

Matthew D. Taylor, Paul V. Nelson, and Jonathan M. Frantz

Oral Session 3—Floriculture 1 27 July 2006, 2:00–3:15 p.m. Oak Alley Moderator: Jonathan Frantz

Free access

Matthew D. Taylor, Paul V. Nelson, and Jonathan M. Frantz

Oral Session 3—Floriculture 1 27 July 2006, 2:00–3:15 p.m. Oak Alley Moderator: Jonathan Frantz

Free access

Michael S. Stanghellini and Jonathan R. Schultheis

1 To whom reprint requests should be addressed; e-mail mikes@aesop.rutgers.edu . 2 E-mail jonathan_schultheis@ncsu.edu . We gratefully acknowledge the technical assistance of Dennis Adams, the assistance of CCRS personnel at Clayton, N

Full access

Jonathan Magby, Gayle M. Volk, Adam Henk, and Steve Miller

al. (2009) were Jonathan (17), Ben Davis (16), Winesap (13), Delicious (12), and Grimes Golden (7). There were 11 cultivars that overlapped between our data set and those that were published by Routson et al. (2009) : Ben Davis, Delicious, Wolf

Free access

Jonathan M. Frantz, Glen Ritchie, Nilton N. Cometti, Justin Robinson, and Bruce Bugbee

1 Current address is USDA-ARS-ATRU, University of Toledo, Mail Stop 604, 2801 W. Bancroft, Toledo, OH 43606. To whom reprint requests should be addressed; e-mail Jonathan.Frantz@utoledo.edu . 2 Current address is College of Agricultural and