Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 83 items for :

  • "Hemiptera" x
  • All content x
Clear All
Free access

Catherine J. Westbrook, David G. Hall, Ed Stover, Yong Ping Duan, and Richard F. Lee

(Hemiptera: Psyllidae) J. Econ. Entomol. 103 1531 1541 Rahmani, M. Hodges, A.W. 2009 Economic impact of Florida's citrus industry, 2007–08 Electronic Data Information Source (EDIS) FE802 Food and Resource Economics Department, University of Florida

Free access

Richard L. Bell

Pear psyllids ( Cacopsylla spp., Hemiptera: Psyllidae) are major pests of European pear ( Pyrus communis L.) in orchards in most temperate regions where the crop is grown ( Berrada et al., 1995 ; Westigard et al., 1970 ). In North America, the

Full access

Augusto Ramírez-Godoy, María del Pilar Vera-Hoyos, Natalia Jiménez-Beltrán, and Hermann Restrepo-Díaz

Asian citrus psyllid (ACP), Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Liviidae), is currently the most important insect pest in the global citrus industry because it is the vector responsible for transmission of the bacteria Candidatus Liberibacter

Free access

John L. Coffey, Alvin M. Simmons, B. Merle Shepard, Yaakov Tadmor, and Amnon Levi

Watermelon cultivars [ Citrullus lanatus (Thunberg) Matsum. and Nakai var. lanatus ] share a narrow genetic base ( Levi et al., 2001a ) and are susceptible to a large number of pests and diseases including whiteflies (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae

Full access

Augusto Ramírez-Godoy, María del Pilar Vera-Hoyos, Natalia Jiménez-Beltrán, and Hermann Restrepo-Diaz

The ACP, D. citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Liviidae), is currently the most important pest for the global citrus industry because it is the vector responsible for transmitting the bacterial pathogen Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus and Ca . L

Free access

Diana Carolina Núñez-López, Augusto Ramírez-Godoy, and Hermann Restrepo-Díaz

(Westwood) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) that can cause yield losses up to 50% and is one of the most prevalent pests in the Andean region in the bean crop ( Manzano and van Lenteren, 2009 ; Rendón et al., 2001 ).The damage this pest generates can be caused by

Free access

Brian K. Hogendorp, Raymond A. Cloyd, and John M. Swiader

in cucumber, against the whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) biotype B Neotrop. Entomol. 34 429 433 Cox, J.M. 1981 Identification of Planococcus citri (Homoptera: Pseudococcidae) and the description of a new species Syst

Free access

Grant T. Kirker, Blair J. Sampson, Cecil T. Pounders, James M. Spiers, and David W. Boyd Jr

gymnosperms by treatment with hot, 60% HNO 3 Stain Technol. 47 322 324 Ishihara, R. Kawai, S. 1981 Feeding habits of the azalea lace bug, Stephanitis pyrioides Scott (Hemiptera: Tingidae) Jap. J. Appl. Enomol. Zool

Full access

Timothy K. Broschat and Thomas J. Weissling

The greenhouse orthezia (Orthezia insignis) is a serious and widespread pest of cultivated lantanas (Lantana sp.) in warmer regions of the world. Forty species and cultivars of lantanas were screened for their relative susceptibility to this insect pest. Results showed that two Florida native lantanas, pineland lantana (L. depressa) and buttonsage (L. involucrata), were highly susceptible to infestation, with trailing lantana (L. montevidensis) and its cultivars and hybrids being somewhat less susceptible. Shrub lantana (L. camara) and its cultivars and hybrids were the least susceptible to greenhouse orthezia infestation, but some of these varieties are rather unattractive as landscape ornamentals and can become serious weeds.

Free access

Richard L. Bell

Sixteen interspecific backcross hybrid selections from various breeding programs have been selected as prospective parents for breeding for resistance of European-type pears to the pear psyllids (Cacopsylla spp.). The Pyrus communis × P. pyrifolia (n = 6) backcross selections are derived mostly from NJ 1, an open-pollinated P. pyrifolia seedling, and the Pyrus communis × P. ussuriensis (n = 9) backcross selections are derived from Illinois 76, an open-pollinated P. ussuriensis seedling, and one Pyrus communis × P. ussuriensis cultivar. Ratings of psylla resistance have been based primarily on multiyear orchard observations under no-pesticide and minimal pesticide conditions. To select the best prospective parents, data on fruit quality and tree traits were analyzed. Fruit characteristics included harvest date, fruit size and shape, skin color, percentage blush, russet, overall appearance, texture (flesh fineness), texture type, juiciness, overall grittiness and grit size, flavor acceptability and type, aroma, and a quality index, which was an unweighted total of the scores for appearance, texture, grit, flavor, and aroma. For this report, comparisons were made to ‘Bartlett’, the most widely grown U.S. pear cultivar. Both the P. communis × P. pyrifolia and Pyrus communis × P. ussuriensis backcross hybrid groups had significantly lower quality indices than ‘Bartlett’, and most individual traits were similar in this respect. There were significant differences among selections for all traits as were differences between years within genotype for most traits with some exceptions. Harvest date, percentage blush, appearance, juiciness, flavor, and the quality index were relatively stable from year to year. Flesh texture type varied within each group. The P. communis × P. pyrifolia selection NJ Rock R23 T252 had the highest quality index of the selections. For eight traits, various selections ranked higher than ‘Bartlett’, although the differences were not significantly higher with the exception of the russet score. Five selections appear to have sufficient quality and are being used as parents.