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Elisha Otieno Gogo, Mwanarusi Saidi, Jacob Mugwa Ochieng, Thibaud Martin, Vance Baird, and Mathieu Ngouajio

French bean [ Phaseolus vulgaris (L.)] is one of the most important introduced vegetable crops in the socioeconomic farming systems of eastern Africa. It is a crop with great potential for addressing food insecurity, income generation, and poverty

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Gavin R. Sills and James Nienhuis

The interactive effects of genotypes, plant population densities, and harvest methods on snap bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) yield evaluation were investigated using a split-split plot factorial arrangement of treatments at two locations Six snap bean processing cultivars were grown at 5.5, 11, and 22 plants/m2 and harvested either by machine or by hand. Each' of three commercial seed companies provided two cultivars, one of which was described as “good” and the other as “poor” for machine harvesting. Genotype × harvest method interactions were not significant for pod count, but were significant when yield was evaluated as pod weight. This latter interaction was explained by a single-degree-of-freedom contrast of genotypes × (“good” vs. “poor” harvestability). Genotype × density and genotype × density × location interactions were significant for both pod count and weight. The density × harvest method interaction was nonsignificant for both yield variables. These results suggest that breeders can evaluate yield of genotypes using either hand or machine harvest but should use plant population densities appropriate to commercial production. Optimum plot size for snap bean yield evaluations at these locations under the various conditions imposed were estimated.

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Nancy A. Reichert and John D. Kemp

Beta-phaseolin, the seed storage protein gene isolated from French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) displays the same developmental pattern of protein accumulation when transferred into tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) The phaseolin gene was modified and then introduced into tobacco via Agrobacterium tumefaciens transformation to look for changes in phaseolin gene expression. Modifications included substitution of the promoter region with that of CaMV 35S, the removal of 3, 4, or all 5 introns, substitution of the 3' untranslated region with that of nopaline synthase, and reversal of internal DNA sequences. All gene constructions (with the exception of those containing reversed sequences) displayed overall correct developmental regulation-phaseolin protein preferentially accumulated to comparable levels at the correct stage of seed maturation.

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Nancy A. Reichert and John D. Kemp

Beta-phaseolin, the seed storage protein gene isolated from French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) displays the same developmental pattern of protein accumulation when transferred into tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) The phaseolin gene was modified and then introduced into tobacco via Agrobacterium tumefaciens transformation to look for changes in phaseolin gene expression. Modifications included substitution of the promoter region with that of CaMV 35S, the removal of 3, 4, or all 5 introns, substitution of the 3' untranslated region with that of nopaline synthase, and reversal of internal DNA sequences. All gene constructions (with the exception of those containing reversed sequences) displayed overall correct developmental regulation-phaseolin protein preferentially accumulated to comparable levels at the correct stage of seed maturation.

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Nirmal K. Hedau, Shri Dhar, Vinay Mahajan, Hari S. Gupta, Karambir S. Hooda, and Vedprakash

French bean ( Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is an important vegetable known as green beans, which is widely cultivated during winter in the subtropics and early spring to fall in temperate zones throughout the world. In India, it is grown in the

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Adrienne E. Kleintop, James R. Myers, Dimas Echeverria, Henry J. Thompson, and Mark A. Brick

Common bean is consumed globally both as a dry bean and also as a vegetable. Two main forms of vegetable beans are consumed, shelled high moisture seeds (shell outs or fresh beans) and snap beans (also referred to as green, garden, or french bean

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Yuqi Li and Neil S. Mattson

concentrations of chlorophyll in the leaves of treated plants [tomato, dwarf french bean ( Phaseolus vulgaris ), wheat ( Triticum aestivum ), barley ( Hordeum vulgare ), and maize ( Zea mays )] than those of untreated controls ( Blunden et al., 1996 ; Khan et al

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Charles J. Wasonga, Marcial A. Pastor-Corrales, Timothy G. Porch, and Phillip D. Griffiths

Snap beans or green beans have been selected for high pod quality with reduced fiber and are consumed as green pods harvested for the fresh market or processing. Slender or ”small-sieve” snap beans or green beans, also known as “French beans” are an

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Jennifer Tillman, Ajay Nair, Mark Gleason, and Jean Batzer

., 2011 ), french bean [ Phaseolus vulgaris ( Gogo et al., 2014 )], and watermelon [ Citrullus lanatus ( Soltani et al., 1995 )]. Rowcovers serve as a physical barrier for the plants, reducing insect damage, disease spread ( Saalau Rojas et al., 2011

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Smiljana Goreta, Daniel I. Leskovar, and John L. Jifon

( Popova et al., 1996 ). A decrease in g s and A CO2 after ABA application was observed as soon as 1 h after treating french bean ( Phaseolus vulgaris L.), sugar beet ( Beta vulgaris L.), and maize ( Zea mays L.) ( Pospisilova and Batkova, 2004