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Monica Ozores-Hampton

-efficient genotypes have specific mechanisms to effectively reduce Fe 3+ to Fe 2+ in the root system. In these plants genotypes the bioavailability of phosphorous (P), Ca, Cu, Zn, and molybdenum (Mo) has a low influence on Fe absorption or is capable of secreting Fe-chelating

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Ritu Dhir, Richard L. Harkess, and Guihong Bi

, expand less, and cup upward. This physiological disorder is referred to as “bleaching.” Plants may resume developing green leaves when the temperatures moderate. Observational evidence indicated that applying Fe-chelate before bleaching helped reduce the

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Joseph P. Albano

) supplied with photodegraded Fe-chelate-containing fertilizer solution, expressed root physiology or nutrition associated with Fe deficiency induced Strategy I Fe efficiency. These plants had enhanced root ferric reductase activity (marigold) and higher

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Joseph P. Albano and Donald J. Merhaut

; Handrek, 1989 ; Wik et al., 2006 ). Work by Albano et al. (1996) and Bachman and Halbrooks (1994) documented that repeated application of soluble fertilizers containing Fe chelate or chelate-ligand resulted in significantly higher levels of soluble Fe

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Ewell Rogers

Abstract

Disodium manganous ethylenediamine tetraacetate (MnEDTA), applied to the soil with 113 and 227 g sodium ferric ethylenediamine di-(o-hydroxyphenylacetate) (FeEDDHA), increased the concentration of Mn and reduced the concentration of Fe in ‘July Elberta’ peach leaves (Prunus persica (L) Batsch). Both rates of the Fe chelate increased Fe and reduced Mn and K in the leaves when compared to non-treated ones. Both rates of the Fe chelate reduced Fe chlorosis and increased shoot growth and size and yield of fruit. Mangenase chelate with 113 g Fe chelate reduced N in the leaves and increased trunk growth. Manganese chelate with 227 g Fe chelate reduced P in leaves. The Zn content in leaves, size of fruit, leaf chlorosis, trunk and shoot growth were not affected by Mn chelate applied with Fe chelate.

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Xianping Guo, Yiwei Bian, Qizhen Qiu, Dongsheng Wang, Zhongying Wu, Zhenzhen Lv, Beijing Zhang, Qingnan Wu, and Hezhong Wang

necessary to develop new and environmentally friendly Fe-chelating agents to improve the absorption of foliar-applied Fe or enhance its translocation efficiency from source to sink tissue ( Malhotra et al., 2020 ). The integration of nanotechnology and

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Joseph P. Albano and William B. Miller

Irradiation of FeDTPA-containing nutrient solutions by a fluorescent plus incandescent light source resulted in the loss of both Fe-chelate and soluble Fe, the formation of a precipitate that was composed mostly of Fe, and a rise in pH. The rate of Fe-chelate photodegradation in solution increased with irradiance intensity and with solution temperature under irradiation, but irradiance had the greater effect. Fe-chelates absorb in the blue and UV regions of the spectrum. Removal of these wavelengths with a spectral filter eliminated photodegradation. Chemical name used: ferric diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (FeDTPA).

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Joseph P. Albano and William B. Miller

Our objective was to determine the effects on plant growth and physiology that a photodegraded Fe-chelate containing lab-prepared nutrient solution would have when used in plant culture. Plants grown hydroponically in the irradiated Fe-DTPA containing nutrient solution had ferric reductase activity 2.2 times greater, foliar Fe level 0.77 times less, and foliar Mn level 1.9 times greater than in plants grown in an identical but non-irradiated solution, indicating that plants growing in the irradiated solution were responding to Fe deficiency stress with physiological reactions associated with Fe efficiency. The youngest leaves of plants that were grown in the irradiated solution had symptoms of Mn toxicity. Restoration of the irradiated solution by removing the precipitated Fe by centrifugation and adding fresh Fe-chelate resulted in plants that were, in general, not different from those grown in the non-irradiated solution (control).

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Joseph P. Albano and William B. Miller

Iron chelate photodegradation is a problem in tissue culture where limited soluble Fe in agar reduces callus tissue growth. Our objectives were to determine if Fe chelate photodegradation occurs in commercial fertilizers used in greenhouse plant production and, if so, the effects on plant Fe acquisition. Commercial 20N–10P–20K soluble fertilizers containing Fe-EDTA were prepared as 100x stocks based on a 100 mg N/liter (1x) concentration. A modified Hoagland's solution with Fe-DTPA was prepared as a 10x stock based on a 200 mg N/liter (1x) concentration. Samples then were kept in darkness or were irradiated with 500 μmol·m–2·s–1 from fluorescent and incandescent sources for ≤240 hours. Soluble Fe in the irradiated commercial fertilizer solutions decreased 85% in 240 h. Soluble Fe in the Hoagland's solution, prepared in the lab, decreased 97% in 72 h. There was no loss in soluble Fe in any dark-stored treatment; demonstrating photodegradation of Fe-chelates under commercial settings. Excised roots of marigold (Tagetes erecta L.), grown hydroponically in the irradiated solutions, had Fe(III)-DTPA reductase activity 2 to 6 times greater than roots of plants grown in solutions kept in darkness. Plants growing in irradiated solutions acidified the rhizosphere more than plants growing in solutions kept dark. The increase in Fe reductase activity and rhizosphere acidification are Fe-efficiency reactions of marigold responding to the photodegradation of Fe-chelates and subsequent decrease in soluble Fe in both commercial fertilizers and lab-prepared nutrient solution.

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Joseph P. Albano and William B. Miller

We have shown previously that Fe-chelates incorporated into soluble fertilizers are vulnerable to photodegradation, and that such solutions can cause modifications in root reductase activity. The objective of this research was to determine the effects of Fe-chelate photodegradation under commercial production conditions. Marigolds were grown in a greenhouse and transplanted stepwise from #200 plug trays to 804 packs to 11.4-cm (4.5-inch) pots. Plants were harvested at the end of each stage, and treatments consisted of either irradiated (complete loss of soluble Fe) or non-irradiated fertilizer solutions ranging from 100-400 mg/L N (0.5–2 mg/L Fe). In the plug and pack stages, foliar Fe was significantly lower and Mn significantly higher in plants treated with the irradiated than nonirradiated fertilizer solutions, averaging 97 μg·g–1 and 115 μg·g–1 Fe, and 217 μg·g–1 and 176 μg·g–1 Mn, respectively. Fe(III)-DTPA reductase activity of roots of plugs treated with the irradiated fertilizer solution was 1.4-times greater than for roots treated with the non-irradiated fertilizer solution. Leaf dry weight in the plug and pack stages was not affected by treatment, and averaged 0.1 g and 1.2 g per plant, respectively.