Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 60 items for :

  • Refine by Access: All x
Clear All
Free access

M.C. Scott, G. Caetano-Anollés, and R.N. Trigiano

The genetic distance of closely related cultivars of Dendranthema grandiflora (chrysanthemum) was assessed using DAF. Thirteen cultivars of chrysanthemum included in the study were members of the following series: Charm (five), Davis (four), and Pomona (four). The genetic variability within and between series were evaluated using 11 arbitrary octamer primers. A few polymorphic loci were evident that uniquely identified closely related cultivars within a series. In contrast, there were many polymorphisms between members of different series. Genetic distances between cultivars within and between series were calculated using marker comparison and UPGMA (cluster analysis). The average distance between series was 10-fold greater than between cultivars within a series. DNA from all cultivars belonging to a series also were bulked to generate DNA profiles containing unique amplified products for each series. Polymorphic loci that were generated by the DAF technique possibly could be used for patent protection and phylogenetic studies and may be useful in breeding for chrysanthemums.

Free access

M.C. Scott, G. Caetano-Anollés, and R.N. Trigiano

The genetic distance of closely related cultivars of Dendranthema grandiflora (chrysanthemum) was assess using DAF. Twenty-three cultivars of chrysanthemum included in the study were members of the following series: Anne (3), Blush (3), Boaldi (4), Charm (5), Davis (4), and Pomona (4). The genetic variability within and between series were evaluated using 11 arbitrary octamer primers. A few polymorphic loci were evident that uniquely identified closely related cultivars within a series. In contrast, many polymorphisms were observed between members of different series. Genetic distances between cultivars within and between series were evaluated using marker comparison and analyzed with PAUP (phylogenic analysis using parsimony) and UPGMA (unweighted pair group cluster analysis using arithmetic means). The average distance between series was 10-fold greater than between cultivars within a series. Furthermore, series with similar flower morphology, pompon or daisy-like, were more closely related than those with different phenotypes. DNA from all cultivars belonging to a series were also bulked to generate DNA profiles containing unique amplified products for each series. Polymorphic loci that were generated by the DAF technique can possibly be used for patent protection and phylogenetic studies, and may be useful in breeding chrysanthemums.

Free access

Terri Woods Starman and Shane Abbitt

Our objective was to distinguish between eight cultivars of two geranium species, Pelargonium ×hortorum L.H. Bailey (cutting and seed geranium) and Pelargonium peltatum (L.) L'Hér. ex Ait. (ivy geranium), and evaluate their genetic relationships using the nucleic acid scanning techniques of DNA amplification fingerprinting (DAF) and/or arbitrary signatures from amplification profiles (ASAP). Cultivars used in the study represented three commercial types: cutting, seed, and ivy geranium. Two seed geranium cultivars from each of the Dynamo and Orbit series were included. Cutting geranium cultivars were `Designer Lilac Chiffon' and `Starburst Red' and the ivy geraniums were `Bernardo Guiber' and `Vinco Guivin'. The ASAP amplification protocol used one of two arbitrary octamer primers, followed by reamplification with one of four different minihairpin primers. ASAP profiles were complex, with 66% of bands being polymorphic and useful in distinguishing between cultivars. Genetic relationships were evaluated by principal coordinate analysis and cluster analysis based on the Jaccard distance estimator. This analysis grouped cultivars by species according to commercial type, i.e., seed geraniums were in one large group, the cutting geraniums were grouped together, and the ivy geraniums were a separate branch.

Free access

Charles Lee Biles, Marisa M. Wall, and Kevin Blackstone

Abbreviations: DAF, days after flowering; C 2 H 5 , ethylene; SDS-PAGE, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis; DNS. dinitrosalicylic acid. 1 Dept. of Agronomy and Horticulture, New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM 88003. This

Open access

Yuting Zou, Yanan Wang, Mingwei Zhu, Shuxian Li, and Qiuyue Ma

, respectively. All chosen individuals bore five subbranches, blossomed on the same day of 6 Apr. 2019, and the flower sizes were almost identical. Forty tagged follicles on the marked trees were collected randomly at 20-d intervals from 45 to 85 DAF, and then at

Free access

D. Scott NeSmith

presence of native pollinators and domestic honeybees near the growing site. CPPU timing treatments were based on the number of days after flowering (DAF). CPPU applications were made at 0, 7, 14, 21, and 28 DAF. Two exceptions were that ‘Brightwell’ and

Open access

Tao Yuan, Qiuying Wei, Pablo Jourdan, and Yong Kwon Yoo

visual observation of seeds. Fifty plants reached flowering on 23 Mar. 2018, and seeds were collected from ≈10 to 15 inflorescences at each harvest date. On 8 Apr. (16 DAF), inflorescences pointed downward (pendulous) ( Fig. 1 ) and with most of flower

Open access

Wen-hui Li, Jian-rong Feng, Shi-kui Zhang, and Zhang-hu Tang

area. The intrinsic qualities of coarse fruits include light taste, low sugar content, higher acidity, more stone cells, and poor taste ( Ma, 2010 ). Coarse ‘Korla’ fragrant fruits began to appear rough-skinned or exhibit hard end symptoms 90 DAF and

Open access

Qiuyue Ma, Shushun Li, Jing Wen, Lu Zhu, Kunyuan Yan, Qianzhong Li, Shuxian Li, and Bin Zhang

DAF) from three individuals of “Lishui” provenance. Seeds collected from the same individuals were used for RNA sequencing and oil content measurements. The samples were frozen in liquid nitrogen immediately following collection and stored at −80 °C

Free access

Valtcho D. Zheljazkov, Tess Astatkie, and Ekaterina Jeliazkova

Apr. 2011 and finishing on 19 Mar. 2012; there were 12 sampling points at the following DAFS: 1, 35, 62, 80, 101, 132, 163, 184, 220, 246, 286, 314, and 342. These DAFS correspond to 12 Apr. 2011, 17 May 2011, 13 June 2011, 1 July 2011, 22 July 2011