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Vladimir Meglic, Jack E. Staub and Larry D. Knerr

Thirty-eight cultivated accessions of the diverse Cucurbitaceae were electrophoretically surveyed using 13 enzyme systems. Included were representatives from 6 of the 6 Cucurbitaceae tribes, 9 genera, and 17 species. Additionally, several cultivars or groups were included for those species possessing marked morphological diversity such as the 7 groups of Cucumis melo var. melo and 7 of the numerous cultivars representing Cucurbita pepo. Zymograms were scored for the presence or absence of bands measured in mm from the origin. Cluster analysis (complete linkage method) was used to detect affinities among the accession surveyed. Data suggest that: 1) Cucumis melo (x=12) possessed greater biochemical affinity with C. sativus (x=7) than with either C. anguira or C. metuliferus (both x=12); 2) Sechium edule and Cyclanthera pedata. both members of the tribe Sicyeae, were more closely associated with members of other tribes than with each other; 3) Some cultivars of Cucurbita pepo shared greater affinity with Cucurbita moschata than with other cultivars of C. pepo. Additional observations as well as their possible implications will be presented.

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William J. Lamont Jr.

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William J. Lamont Jr.

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Karen R. Harris, W. Patrick Wechter and Amnon Levi

conservation of these markers among the genera of the Cucurbitaceae, sequence-tagged site (STS) primers were developed from a clone representing each WRGA class. Nucleotide sequences of all WRGA groups were aligned using AliBee and WRGA-STS primers were

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B.D. Bruton, T.W. Popham, J. García-Jiménez, J. Armengol and M.E. Miller

Thirty-seven species within Cucurbitaceae representing the genera Citrullus, Cucumis, Cucurbita, Lagenaria, and Luffa were evaluated for disease reaction to an Acremonium cucurbitacearum A. Alfaro-Garcia, W. Gams, and Garcia-Jimenez, isolate (TX 941022) from the Lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas. After 28 days in the greenhouse, seedling disease ratings were made on the hypocotyl, stem-root junction, primary root, and secondary roots. An additional disease measure was derived by averaging the four root disease ratings to establish a disease severity index (DSI). Vine and root dry weight were poor measures of plant damage caused by A. cucurbitacearum. According to the DSI, all species within Cucurbita, Lagenaria, Luffa, and three Cucumis sativus L. cultigens were rated as highly resistant to A. cucurbitacearum. Cucumis melo L. and Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. & Nakai cultigens were the only cucurbits receiving DSI ratings of moderately resistant to susceptible.

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Kristen Young and Eileen A. Kabelka

zucchini J. Econ. Entomol. 92 700 707 Carle, R.B. Webb, S. Chandler, C. 1998 Genetic analysis of resistance to whitefly silvering in Cucurbita pepo L 84 89 McCreight J.D. Cucurbitaceae ‘98

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Yiqun Weng

The African horned cucumber or horned melon, Cucumis metuliferus (2n = 2 x = 24), is a member of the Cucurbitaceae family, which includes several economically important vegetable crops (cucurbits) like cucumber, melon, squash ( Cucurbita ssp

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Timothy Coolong and Kenneth Seebold

Holmes G.J. Procedings of Cucurbitaceae 2006 Universal Press Raleigh, NC McGrath, M.T. Staniszewska, H. 1996 Management of powdery mildew in summer squash with host resistance, disease threshold-based fungicide programs, or an integrated program Plant Dis

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Amnon Levi, Alvin M. Simmons, Laura Massey, John Coffey, W. Patrick Wechter, Robert L. Jarret, Yaakov Tadmor, Padma Nimmakayala and Umesh K. Reddy

for assessing genetic relationships among Citrullus species and subspecies. Literature Cited Bailey, L.H. 1930 Three discussions in Cucurbitaceae Gentes Herbarum 2 175 186 Burkill, H.M. 1985 The useful plants of west tropical Africa. 2nd ed. Royal

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Yuliya A. Salanenka, Martin C. Goffinet and Alan G. Taylor

Cucurbitaceae seeds ( Ramakrishna and Amritphale, 2005 ; Yim and Bradford, 1998 ). This envelope is reported to consist of a single cell layer of endosperm whose outer surface is covered by lipid and callose layers ( Yim and Bradford, 1998 ). The PE envelope of