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Usha R. Palaniswamy and Richard J. McAvoy

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Robert J. Dufault

Fifty-six field plantings of `Baccus', `Citation', `Packman', and `Southern Comet' broccoli were made in Charleston, S.C., at 2-week intervals from February to November from 1990 to 1992. The objective was to determine broccoli's response to growing season mean (GSM) temperatures for several important market quality characteristics, such as head shape, color, density, leafiness, and bead size. Regression analysis determined whether quality was more affected by GSM minimum (min) or maximum (max) temperature for each head quality characteristic. Head leafiness and density of `Baccus' were insensitive to GSM min (7.0 to 23.5 °C) and GSM max (17.5 to 32.5 °C) temperatures experienced during these years. `Baccus' head color was unacceptable at <20.3 °C GSM max and head shape was unacceptable at <19.8 and >26.8 °C GSM max. `Citation' head color and leafiness were unacceptable at >20.5 and >20.2 °C GSM max, respectively. Head density of `Citation' was unacceptable at <19.2 and >28.9 °C GSM max and head shape was unacceptable at <18.4 and >25.7 °C GSM max. Quality of `Packman' was unacceptable for head color at <21.0 and >27.3 °C GSM max, head leafiness at >32.0 °C GSM max, head density at <8.4 and >18.0 °C GSM min, and head shape at >22.0 °C GSM max. `Southern Comet' head quality was unacceptable for head color at <9.2 and >16.5 °C GSM min, head leafiness at >32.0 °C GSM max, head density at <8.9 and >16.2 °C GSM min, and head shape at <21.0 and >25.3 °C GSM max. GSM min or max temperatures did not affect bead size of any cultivar during any planting time studied.

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Robert J. Dufault

The objective of this research was to determine the least variable method to predict the dates of the first and last broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var Italica) harvests based on heat unit summation using coefficients of variation (cv). The method with the lowest cv for predicting first harvest was to sum, over days from planting to harvest, the difference between the growing season mean (GSM) temperature and a base temperature of 7.2 °C. If the GSM maximum (max) temperature, however, was >26.7 °C, an adjusted max temperature was calculated by first subtracting 26.7 °C from the GSM max temperature and then subtracting the GSM mean temperature. Then the growing degree days (GDDs) were summed by subtracting the base temperature of 7.2 °C from the average of the GSM minimum (min) and adjusted max temperatures. This method produced a cv of 3.96 compared to 4.13 for the standard method of summing over the entire growing season, the mean temperature minus the base temperature of 4.4 °C. The method with the lowest cv for predicting last harvest was to sum, over days from planting to harvest, the difference between the GSM max temperature and a base temperature of 7.2 °C. If the GSM max temperature, however, was >29.4 °C, the base temperature was subtracted from 29.4 °C and not the actual GSM max temperature. This method produced a cv of 3.71 compared to 4.10 for the standard method of summing over the growing season, the mean temperature minus the base of 4.4 °C.

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R.T. Taylor and E.A. Borchers

`Squire' Scotch kale (Brassica oleracea L.) (n = 9) and `Premier' smooth-leaved kale (B. napus L.) (n = 19) were planted in a field study to compare the onset and rate of flower stalk elongation after overwintering. Flower stalk elongation began 28 days later in `Premier' than in `Squire`; `Premier' plants remained marketable 24 days longer. In spite of the delay in the onset of stalk elongation, siliques of `Premier' were only 3 days later maturing.

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Kai Jia, Cunyao Yan, Huizhuan Yan, and Jie Gao

Turnip ( Brassica rapa L. subsp. rapa ) is a major root vegetable belonging to the Brassica subspecies of the family Cruciferae. It originated in Europe and was taken to Asia and Northern China during the ancient Greek and Roman periods ( Basak

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S. Bergeron, M.-P. Lamy, B. Dansereau, S. Gagne, S. Parent, and P. Moutoglis

While the majority of terrestial plants are colonized in soils by vesicular-arbuscular fungi (AM), that does not mean that these species can form a symbiosis with AM fungi in an artificial substrate under commercial production conditions. The purpose of this study was to identify those plants having a colonization potential. In Mar. 1998, 51 species and cultivars of ornamental plants were inoculated with two vesicular-arbuscular fungi (Glomus intraradices Schenk & Smith, and Glomus etunicatum Becker & Gerdemann; Premier Tech, Rivière-du-Loup, Quèbec). Periodic evaluations of colonization were done 5, 7, 9, 12, and 16 weeks after seeding. More than 59% of these plants tested were shown to have a good colonization potential with G. intraradices. Species belonging to the Compositae and Labiatae families all colonized. Species in the Solanaceae family showed slight to excellent colonization. Several species studied belonging to the Amaranthaceae, Capparidaceae, Caryophyllaceae, Chenopodiaceae, Cruciferae, Gentianaceae, Myrtaceae et Portulaceae families were not colonized. Root colonization with G. etunicatum was not detected on these species and cultivars during this short experimental period.

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Hiroshi Hamamoto and Keisuke Yamazaki

found an SDP that reacts to blue light in the same way as C. allionii in Funke's study. Malvaceae (the mallow family) is more closely related to the Cruciferae than the families of the plants used in any of the previous studies as judged by

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Dean A. Kopsell, J. Scott McElroy, Carl E. Sams, and David E. Kopsell

The family Brassicaceae (Cruciferae) represents a diverse group of plant species commercially important in many parts of the world. The plants produce condiment mustard; leafy, stored, processed, and picked vegetables; seed oils for margarine

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Fernando A. De Villena, Vincent A. Fritz, Jerry D. Cohen, and William D. Hutchison

the specialist beetles Phyllotreta nemorum and P. cruciferae . Larval feeding could have caused a translocation of gluconasturtiin from wounded to nonwounded areas as suggested previously ( Agrell et al., 2003 ; Bodnaryk, 1992 ). It is also

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Rick A. Boydston, Treva Anderson, and Steven F. Vaughn

product in strawberry Acta Hort. 348 315 320 Oleszek, W. 1987 Allelopathic effects of volatiles from some Cruciferae species on lettuce, barnyard grass and wheat growth Plant Soil 102 271 274 Oleszek