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Abstract

The tendency for axillary head (AH) development in Brassica oleracea (Capitata group) was shown to be a heritable characteristic. In 11 crosses between high and low AH lines carried at least through the F2 generation, AH was recessive and largely controlled by one or a few genes. In other crosses, in which only the F1 generation was studied, AH tendency usually resembled that of the parent having a low level of AH, but in certain crosses was intermediate or closer to the high scoring parent. Expression of AH was continuous and apparently influenced by modifying genes and the environment. Broadsense heritability estimates were high, but narrowsense heritability estimates were very low indicating dominance effects. No consistent or apparently important differences were found between reciprocals. The weight of AH was not related to yield of main heads in F2 plants.

Open Access
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Abstract

A comparison of inheritance patterns and heritability estimates from a NCII crossing model which included green and red cabbage, Brassica oleracea L. (Capitata group) indicated differences between green × green and red × green crosses. Green × green crosses exhibit dominance for early maturity, large head weight, small non-wrapper leaf weight and small stalk weight while red × green crosses exhibit the opposite dominance pattern.

Open Access

Cabbage (cv. Bravo) was grown in 2002 and 2003 at The Ohio State Univ., Ohio Agricultural Research and development Center in Wooster, Ohio. The four irrigation treatments, arranged in a RCB design, were: 1) irrigation throughout development [no stress (NS)], 2) irrigation only during head development [frame stress (FS)], 3) irrigation only during frame development [head stress (HS)], and 4) no irrigation [frame and head stress (FHS)]. Irrigation timing relative to crop stage significantly affected all head characteristics except density, with the greatest differences between cabbage receiving irrigation during head development (NS, FS) and cabbage not irrigated during head development (FHS, HS). On average, heads from NS and FS plots were heavier (38%), larger (15%), less pointed and had less volume occupied by the core than heads from HS and FHS plots. Combined head fructose and glucose concentrations were significantly greater in cabbage receiving irrigation during head development than in cabbage not irrigated during head development (47% vs. 41% dwt, respectively). Sucrose concentrations were significantly greater in cabbage not irrigated during head development than cabbage receiving irrigation during head development (8% vs. 6% dwt, respectively). The higher ratio of sucrose: fructose+glucose observed in HS and FHS relative to NS and FS treatments was interpreted as an osmo-regulatory response with potential implications for cabbage flavor. Overall, it was concluded that physiological responses elicited in cabbage by differential irrigation can affect important head traits, and that targeted applications of water during specific stages of crop development may be utilized to maximize water use efficiency and crop quality.

Free access

Glucosinolates are secondary plant products of the Brassicaceae that may influence vegetable flavor and human health. Soil moisture levels and plant water status are thought to influence cabbage head glucosinolate levels. However, no information is available on the effect of irrigation timing relative to plant developmental stage on glucosinolate concentrations in cabbage. To address these gaps in the literature, cabbage (cv. Bravo) was grown in 2002 and 2003 at The Ohio State Univ., Ohio Agricultural Research and development Center in Wooster, Ohio. The four irrigation treatments, arranged in a RCB design, were: 1) irrigation throughout development [no stress (NS)], 2) irrigation only during head development [frame stress (FS)], 3) irrigation only during frame development [head stress (HS)], and 4) no irrigation [frame and head stress (FHS)]. Irrigation was supplied via drip tape and scheduled by the hand-feel method. Differential soil moisture levels among treatments were confirmed with gypsum block, time domain reflectometry (TDR) and gravimetric measurements. Analyzed across years, irrigation timing significantly affected total glucosinolate concentrations, with levels 36% greater in cabbage not irrigated during head development (HS, FHS) relative to cabbage receiving irrigation during head development (NS, FS). Concentrations were highest (29.4 mmol·kg-1) and lowest (19.4 mmol·kg-1) in FHS and FS cabbage, respectively. Irrigation effects were greater in 2002, when air temperatures were higher and rainfall and relative humidity lower than in 2003. We conclude from the data that head development is the critical stage at which irrigation should be applied in order to influence cabbage glucosinolate levels at maturity.

Free access

Abstract

Cabbage leaf disks (Brassica oleracea L., Capitata group) were floated (adaxial side up) in Cu2+ solutions (0, 0.16, and 0.40 mm Cu2+) for 1–4 days. The experiments were conducted in both light and dark environments. In light, total chlorophyll, chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b, and chlorophyll a/b ratios declined linearly with increasing exposure duration and Cu2+ concentrations. The rate and magnitude of these declines were unaffected by the addition of 0.5 mm CaCl2. Between the 2 cultivars tested, the relative chlorophyll contents in ‘Market Prize’ declined faster and reached lower levels than ‘Resistant Danish’, suggesting that ‘Market Prize’ is more susceptible to Cu2+stress. In the absence of light, there was little difference between the chlorophyll loss in the controls and Cu2+-treated tissue. For light and dark experiments, loss of chlorophyll a was primarily responsible for reductions in total chlorophyll content and in chlorophyll a/b ratios.

Open Access

Abstract

Wider spacing and fertilizer application increased the weight of both axillary heads (AH) and main heads in an open-pollinated cultivar and an inbred line. AH weight increased more than main head weight. The effect of spacing on AH was greater than that of fertilizer application. Transplanting greatly decreased the development of axillary heads when compared with direct-seeding.

Open Access

Abstract

Three glasshouse experiments were conducted in which “starter” N, P, and K fertilizers were incorporated either within or below gel used for fluid sowing pregerminated seed of ‘Avondefiance’ lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) and ‘Derby Day’ cabbage (Brassica oleracea L. Capitata group). Addition of nutrients to the gel at salt concentrations between 384 and 1893 mg-ion/liter inhibited emergence of the pregerminated seeds. Additions to the gel at concentrations between 9 and 21 mg-ions/liter were too low to affect the growth of the plants. Nutrient solutions applied to the base of the furrow immediately prior to fluid drilling the seeds allowed higher concentrations of salts to be used without reducing emergence. Solutions that contained factorial combinations of 0.84 g/liter N, 1.86 g/liter P, and 2.34 g/liter K applied at the rate of 0.5 ml/cm of furrow increased lettuce dry matter production by up to 44% after 20 days growth, although there was no significant effect on the growth of cabbage. The increase in lettuce growth was mainly in response to P ‘starter’ fertilizer but the largest response was achieved with the N + P + K ‘starter’ treatment.

Open Access

concentrations in six commercial cultivars of cabbage ( Brassica oleracea L., Capitata group) HortScience 40 106 110 Rosen, C.J. Fritz, V.A. Gardner, G.M. Hecht, S.S. Carmella, S.G. Kenney, P

Free access
Authors: and

Abstract

A comparison of inheritance patterns and heritability estimates from a NCII crossing model which included green and red cabbage, Brassica oleracea L. Capitata group, indicated differences between green × green and red × green crosses. Green × green crosses exhibited dominance for few non-wrapper leaves, greater efficiency index, and smaller leaf size while red × green crosses showed the opposite dominance pattern.

Open Access

Abstract

Seeds of cabbage (Brassica oleracea (Capitata group) contain 10-fold more glucosinolates than do cabbage heads (dry basis). Seeds give rise to relatively greater amounts of goitrin and lesser amounts of SCN ion than do heads. In spite of these differences, seeds of 50 cabbage cultivars are shown to have fair predictive value for glucosinolate patterns in the corresponding heads.

Open Access