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James A. LaMondia and Nina Shishkoff

-growing, long-lived plant and can be extremely valuable; economically and historically important plantings exist in many locations. The boxwood blight pathogen affects all Buxus species including Japanese [ Pachysandra terminalis ( LaMondia et al., 2012

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Dewayne L. Ingram, Charles R. Hall and Joshua Knight

boxwood production, but these three combinations were chosen to be representative ( Fig. 1 ) of the most common west coast nursery production techniques. Fig. 1. System scenarios for production of Buxus microphylla var. japonica ‘Green Beauty’ to be

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Susmitha Nambuthiri, Ethan Hagen, Amy Fulcher and Robert Geneve

in an outdoor, aboveground nursery and controlled environment settings. Plants used included Green Velvet boxwood ( Buxus sempervirens L. × B. microphylla Siebold & Zucc. var. koreana ‘Green Velvet’) and slender deutzia ( Deutzia gracilis

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Yonghong Guo, Richard T. Olsen, Matthew Kramer and Margaret Pooler

Boxwood ( Buxus L. spp.) are slow-growing evergreen shrubs and small trees. They are commonly grown as hedges and for topiary and are commercially important components of managed landscapes. Over 13 million boxwood plants are sold in the United

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Alice Le Duc, Linda R. Parsons and John C. Pair

Contribution #99-237-J from the Kansas Agr. Expt. Sta. We wish to acknowledge the donation of Buxus microphylla `Winter Gem' by Greenleaf Nurseries, Park Hill, Okla., and Buxus `Green Mountain' and `Green Velvet' by Nortex Tawakoni Plant

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Xiang Cao, Darrell Bosch and James Pease

.), Holly ( Ilex spp.), and Boxwood ( Buxus spp.) are among the top 5 broadleaf evergreen plants sold in the three states. Because of their popularity and to be consistent with premiums estimated by Hartter (2012) , this analysis uses these six plants for

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Diane Feliciano Cayanan, Mike Dixon, Youbin Zheng and Jennifer Llewellyn

Version 9.1 (SAS Institute, Cary, NC). Contrast comparisons using a Type I error rate of 0.05 were used to determine the chlorine effects on each plant species. Results Visual injury. None of the evergreen shrubs ( Juniperus , Thuja , Buxus , Picea

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Nastaran Basiri Jahromi, Forbes Walker, Amy Fulcher, James Altland and Wesley C. Wright

experiment was conducted at the University of Tennessee North Greenhouse Complex, in Knoxville, TN, for 8 weeks and initiated on 15 June 2015. Buxus sempervirens L. × B. microphylla (‘Green Velvet’ boxwood) and H. paniculata (Pinky Winky ® hardy

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Luis A. Valdez-Aguilar, Catherine M. Grieve, Abdul Razak-Mahar, Milton E. McGiffen and Donald J. Merhaut

boxwood [ Buxus microphylla var. japonica (Mull. Arg. ex Miq) Rehder & E.H. Wilson ‘Green Beauty’], escallonia ( Escallonia × exoniensis hort. Veich ex Bean ‘Fradesii’), hawthorn [ Raphiolepis indica (L.) Lind. Ex Ker Gawl. × ‘Montic’], hibiscus

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Barbara Biernacka and Mary Ann Rose

Seasonal patterns of N uptake and allocation in Buxus microphylla, Acer × freemanii and Fothergilla gardenii were investigated for improving fertilization strategies. Rooted cuttings were planted to 3.5-L containers 25 May 1995. Plants were drip-irrigated on an as-needed basis with N at 50, 100, or 200 mg·L–1 solutions. Leaves, stems, and roots were destructively harvested every 6 weeks, starting 24 June. Net changes in dry weight and N uptake were determined for each of four, 6-week periods. Increasing N rate increased tissue N concentration in all species, and reduced root: shoot ratios in Acer and Fothergilla. Dry weights of Acer increased with N rate; whereas other species gave no positive response in dry weight beyond N at 100 mg·L–1. Nitrogen at the 200-mg·L–1 rate caused severe injury to Fothergilla. Nitrogen uptake of the deciduous species increased in the first three periods, with greatest N uptake between 1 Sept. and 12 Oct. Greatest N uptake in Buxus occurred between 15 July and 1 Sept. Total N content in Buxus increased between 15 Oct. an 1 Dec. with a large proportion of N appearing to shift from leaf to stem tissue. In the other species, leaf abscission caused a net reduction in total N contents in the 100 and 200 mg·L–1 rates, although stem and root N contents increased. Increasing N rate in Acer delayed fall coloration but hastened leaf abscission. End-of-season N recovery (N taken up/N applied) was extremely low, and decreased with increasing rate of N. Acer had the highest recoveries (4.1%, 2.6%, and 2.0%) for low, medium, and high fertilizer rates, followed by Buxus (2.6%, 2.2%, 1.0%) and Fothergilla (1.7%, 1.8%, 0.4%).