Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 9 of 9 items for :

  • "All-American selection" x
  • All content x
Clear All
Free access

Mario R. Morales and James E. Simon

Free access

Neil O. Anderson, Peter D. Ascher, and James J. Luby

The change from asexual to sexual propagation for annual and perennial bedding plants has been successfully accomplished for floral crops, e.g., Pelargonium. Seed-propagated cultivars do not necessarily possess the clonal uniformity of vegetatively propagated cultivars. In the development of F1 hybrid garden chrysanthemums, this lack of uniformity was assessed with the use of consumer sensory evaluations. Seedlings (n = 10–20 plants/cross) were transplanted for field trials in St. Paul and five Minnesota branch stations each year during 1988–94 to test for G × E. Early flowering F1 hybrids, developed from inbred parents with general combining ability, were evaluated for flowering earliness, plant uniformity, and a general rating. Consumer rankings of top performers were not significantly different (5% level) from mum breeders. The top performers for all three ratings were selected each year for repeat evaluation the next year. The two highest performing F1 hybrids were submitted for All American Selection Trials in 1995.

Free access

Robert E. Lyons

An historic feature of the JC Raulston Arboretum (JCRA) is to identify new and unusual ornamental plant materials for landscape use through an active program of observing landscape performance at the JCRA in Raleigh. Introduction of plant materials into commerce occurs primarily through programs conducted in concert with the North Carolina Association of Nurserymen and through a unique policy of “open access” for nurserymen. One program, The JC Raulston Selections Program, returns revenues to the general operations and maintenance functions of the JCRA; others are not revenue generating, and are provided as a service to the industry. To a lesser extent, the general public may participate in receiving new plants via a special program offered through JCRA membership. The JCRA is also an official trial garden site for the All America Selections program and seed companies. Elements of these introduction and evaluation programs will be discussed within the context of the past, present, and plans for the future for program maintenance and possible changes.

Free access

Susan L. Hamilton

Many new plants and varieties are introduced into the market every year. Little information is generally available about the landscape performance of these plants. To take the guesswork out of their landscape performance in the Tennessee region, the Univ. of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture (UTIA) Gardens were established. Started in 1983 as an All-America Selections (AAS) Test Garden, on less than a quarter of an acre, the UTIA Gardens have grown to 5 acres and now include plant introductions from 25 commercial seed and plant companies. An average of 550 summer and winter annuals are evaluated annually in addition to an assortment of bulbs, perennials, herbs, groundcovers, ornamental grasses, aquatics, trees, and shrubs. Because of the volume of plants, evaluation criteria are in conjunction with industry requests and are not always replicated. In addition to university support, the gardens receive revenues from the sponsoring commercial seed and plant companies, the Tennessee green industry trade associations, a “Friends of the Gardens” support group, and gifts. As a result of the herbaceous plant evaluation program, the UTIA Gardens have grown to be a significant resource for the university, community, and green industry. A variety of university departments use the gardens in their teaching; community groups, including schools, tour and use the gardens; and open houses and field days assist commercial growers and landscapers in remaining current on new plant introductions and their performance.

Free access

John R. Stommel and Robert J. Griesbach

Considerable diversity exists in Capsicum L. germplasm for fruit and leaf shape, size and color, as well as plant habit. This morphological diversity, together with diverse ripe fruit color and varying hues of green to purple and variegated foliar pigmentation, affords myriad opportunities to develop unique cultivars for ornamental applications. The Agricultural Research Service of the United States Department of Agriculture announces the release of a new pepper [Capsicumannuum (L.)] cultivar named `Black Pearl'. `Black Pearl' is intended for ornamental applications and affords growers a new crop to add to their bedding and landscape plant assortment. `Black Pearl' combines black foliage with erect clusters of small round red-pigmented fruit. The vibrant fruit and foliage colors of this new cultivar add interest to the summer and fall garden. Black Pearl' has been trialed extensively for use as a bedding plant where its compact growth habit, black foliage, and brightly colored fruit provide an attractive ornamental display. Limited evaluations suggest that this cultivar is equally well suited for pot culture under high light conditions. `Black Pearl' was designated a 2006 All America Selection award winner after completion of national trials in 2004. `Black Pearl' is a release made available from a cooperative research and development agreement with Pan American Seed Company. Seed of `Black Pearl' is available from Pan American Seed Company, 622 Town Road, West Chicago, IL 60185. Plant Variety Protection for `Black Pearl' is pending.

Free access

varieties in the All-America Selection Trials. In 1991 Paul became Senior Vice President of Product Marketing for Peto Seed Company and held this position until he retired in 1993. In 1955 Paul joined the American Society for Horticultural Science and

Full access

Mary H. Meyer, Pamela J. Bennett, Barbara Fair, James E. Klett, Kimberly Moore, H. Brent Pemberton, Leonard Perry, Jane Rozum, Alan Shay, and Matthew D. Taylor

Selections (Downers Grove, IL) is expected to fill this void in the future ( Blazek, 2017b ). Herbaceous annual flower and vegetable trials have been conducted for many years by the All-America Selections organization ( Blazek, 2017a ) and universities within

Full access

Elsa S. Sánchez, Thomas M. Butzler, Lee J. Stivers, Timothy E. Elkner, Steven M. Bogash, R. Eric Oesterling, and Michael D. Orzolek

’ for buttercup/kabocha squash ( Tables 1 and 2 ). ‘Waltham Butternut’ has been considered an industry standard butternut squash ever since it received All-America Selections winner status in 1970. ‘Tay Belle’ has been recommended since the 1990s

Free access

John R. Stommel and Robert J. Griesbach

recent introduction of ‘Black Magic’ elephant ear [ Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott], ‘Blackie’ sweetpotato vine [ Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.], and the All-America Selection ‘Black Pearl’ pepper ( C. annuum L.) has created an increased demand for garden