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Shiow Y. Wang and Miklos Faust

The activity of ascorbic acid oxidase (AAO) was studied in apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) buds during dormancy and thidiazuron-induced budbreak. In dormant buds, activity of AAO was low compared with buds that were treated with thidiazuron and had resumed growth. An increase in AAO activity began at the time of metabolic transition from dormancy to budbreak. The highest level of activity was reached 10 days after thidiazuron induction during the expansion growth phase. In vitro AAO activity of apple bud extract was increased by addition of Cu (CuSO) and inhibited by Cu-chelating agents, diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC), sodium azide (NaN), and 8-hydroxyquinoiine (8-OH-Q). In vivo treatment of apple buds with Cu-chelating agents inhibited AAO activity and bud growth but not budbreak. Chemical name used: N- phenyl -N' -1,2,3-thidiazol-5-ylurea (thidiazuron).

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Ya-Ching Chuang and Yao-Chien Alex Chang

humidity of 60%. Expt. 1: Effects of different sugars and 8-hydroxyquinoline sulfate concentrations on vase life of Eustoma cut flowers. Vase lives of cut flowers in 10 different vase solutions were tested, including 100, 200, and 400 mg·L −1 8-HQS; 20 g

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Lingfang Kong, Fan Li, Ronghui Du, Huaiting Geng, Shifeng Li, and Jihua Wang

calculated with Tukey’s honestly significant difference test (α = 0.05). DW refers to the distilled water control. The concentration of the Chrysal solution is 30 mg/L. S: sucrose; 8-HQ: 8-hydroxyquinoline. ( B ) The correlation analysis of the sucrose

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John M. Dole, Zenaida Viloria, Frankie L. Fanelli, and William Fonteno

biocides in the vase solutions decreases microbial growth and therefore maintains healthier vascular tissue. Results may be cultivar specific as vase life of ‘Florex Gold’ calla lily ( Zantedeschia elliottiana ) was extended after a 2-h pulse in 8

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E. V. Parups and A. P. Chan

Abstract

A floral preservative solution containing iso-ascorbic acid, 100 ppm, sucrose, 4%, and 8-hydroxyquinoline sulfate, 50 ppm, extended cut rose life and was equal to other preservative formulations for carnations and snapdragons. Biochemical and other changes in rose petals resulting from the use of this preservative solution are described.

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Henry R. Owen and A. Raymond Miller

A comparison of pretreatment, fixing, and staining methods for root tips of Fragaria × ananassa (2n=8x=56), a polyploid species with small chromosomes, was made to facilitate chromosome counting. Three pretreatments (8-hydroxyquinoline, α-bromonaphthalene, and p-dichlorobenzene), three fixatives (Farmer's, Carnoy's, and Newcomer's), and five stains (acetocarmine, lacto-propionic orcein, leucobasic fuchsin, altered carbol fuchsin, and alcoholic hydrochloric-acid carmine) were examined in a factorial design to determine which treatment combination produced the best chromosome preparation. Field propagated runners were grown in sand under greenhouse conditions with supplemental lighting to produce root tips for late morning collection. The treatment combinations of α-bromonaphthalene or 8-hydroxyquinoline, Farmer's fixative, and altered carbol fuchsin, or the combination of α-bromonaphthalene, Farmer's fixative, and alcoholic hydrochloric-acid carmine produced the most intensely-stained and well-defined preparations.

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Henry R. Owen and A. Raymond Miller

A factorial combination of pretreatments, fixatives, and stains was examined to identify the best available method for staining the chromosomes of strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa Duch. `Chandler') root-tip cells. Three pretreatments (a -bromonaphthalene, p -dichlorobenzene, and 8-hydroxyquinoline), three fixatives (Farmer's fluid, Carnoy's fluid, and Newcomer's fluid), and five stains (acetocarmine, alcoholic hydrochloric-acid carmine, altered carbol fuchsin, lacto-propionic orcein, and leucobasic fuchsin) were tested. Pretreatment with either a -bromonaphthalene (saturated aqueous) or 8-hydroxyquinoline (2 mm) for 5 hours at 14C, overnight fixation in Farmer's fluid, hydrolysis in 1 n HCl (15 minutes at 60C), and staining with altered carbol fuchsin produced chromosome preparations superior to other treatment combinations. Treatment with a-bromonaphthalene, Farmer's fluid, and alcoholic hydrochloric-acid carmine (2 days at 25C) also produced acceptable chromosome preparations.

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A. Apelbaum and M. Katchansky

Abstract

Immersing the cut stem of flowers for 24-72 hours in a solution containing thiabendazole and sucrose facilitated opening, improved quality, and prolonged vase life of bud cut carnations, mini-carnations and chrysanthemum harvested at the bud stage, and of gladiolus, mini-gladiolus, snapdragons and gypsophila harvested considerably earlier than recommended commercially. This treatment was shown to be more effective than 8-hydroxy-quinoline, in all cases, and more effective than silver nitrate treatment in the case of gypsophila. The flowers treated with thiabendazole were larger and heavier, and retained their decorative value for a longer time. Adding 8-hydroxyquinoline to thiabendazole solutions to form the “TOG” formula improved the effectiveness of the treatment for commercial use and allowed re-usage of the solution several times.

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Susan S. Han, Abraham H. Halevy, and Michael S. Reid

Vase life of individual flowers of cut brodiaea (Triteleia laxa Benth.) inflorescences ended 4 days after opening. Best vase life was achieved by harvesting inflorescences 1 to 2 days before anthesis of the first flower and holding them in a vase solution containing 2% sucrose and 200 ppm 8-hydroxyquinoline citrate (HQC). Such inflorescences had a display life of 12 days. Decreasing the pH of the vase solution or pulsing inflorescences with 10% sucrose for 16 hours did not increase their longevity. T. laxa flowers pretreated with 10% sucrose overnight could be stored for up to 2 weeks without significant reduction in vase life.

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Yan Ma, M. Nurul Islam-Faridi, Charles F. Crane, David M. Stelly, H. James Price, and David H. Byrne

To our knowledge, there has been no published technique to produce consistently high-quality slides of somatic chromosomes of roses (Rosa sp.). Therefore, various pretreatments, fixatives, digestions, stains, and maceration and squashing methods were tested to identify a procedure to produce clear, well-spread chromosomes from shoot tips. The best results were obtained after pretreatment in a mixture of 0.1% colchicine and 0.001 m 8-hydroxyquinoline for 4 h, and fixation in 2 acetone: 1 acetic acid (v/v) with 2% (w/v) polyvinylpyrrolidone. The darkest-stained chromosomes were obtained with carbol-fuchsin staining of air-dried cell suspensions that had been spread in 3 ethanol: 1 acetic acid (v/v).