Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 99 items for :

  • "‘Peace’" x
Clear All
Free access

Ursula K. Schuch, H. Brent Pemberton and Jack J. Kelly

’, ‘Mister Lincoln’, and ‘Peace’ were laid outdoors in the shade and protected from wind on a concrete loading dock and were allowed to air dry for 0, 1, 3, 5, or 7 h. Wet and dry bulb temperatures were measured with a sling psychrometer; corresponding

Free access

Umesh R. Rosyara, Audrey M. Sebolt, Cameron Peace and Amy F. Iezzoni

array v1) was developed and used to genotype a diverse array of 269 sweet cherry individuals ( Peace et al., 2012 ). A total of 1825 SNPs were polymorphic in this germplasm ( Peace et al., 2012 ), indicating that a large number of polymorphic markers

Free access

Kate M. Evans, Bruce H. Barritt, Bonnie S. Konishi, Marc A. Dilley, Lisa J. Brutcher and Cameron P. Peace

) and PCR conditions were as described by Bassil et al. (2005) . Amplified fragments for all markers were separated on large polyacrylamide gels and silver-stained as described by Peace et al. (2005) . Alleles were scored for ‘WA 2’, ‘Splendour’, and

Free access

Kate M. Evans, Bruce H. Barritt, Bonnie S. Konishi, Marc A. Dilley, Lisa J. Brutcher and Cameron P. Peace

analysis with physical textural data from a computerized penetrometer in the Washington State University Apple Breeding Program HortTechnology 20 1026 1029 Evans, K.M. Barritt, B.H. Konishi, B.S. Dilley, M.A. Brutcher, L.J. Peace, C.P. 2010b ‘WA 2’ apple

Free access

Cari A. Schmitz, Matthew D. Clark, James J. Luby, James M. Bradeen, Yingzhu Guan, Katherine Evans, Benjamin Orcheski, Susan Brown, Sujeet Verma and Cameron Peace

. Cestaro, A. Velasco, R. Main, D. Rees, J.D. Iezzoni, A. Mockler, T. Wilhelm, L. van de Weg, E. Gardiner, S.E. Bassil, N. Peace, C. 2012 Genome-wide SNP detection, validation, and development of an 8k SNP array for apple PLoS ONE 7 e31745 DeLong, J

Free access

Joshua D. Williamson, Cameron P. Peace, Frederick A. Bliss, David T. Garner and Carlos H. Crisosto

The Y locus of peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch] controls whether a tree will produce fruit with white or yellow flesh. Flesh color has implications for consumer acceptance and nutritional quality, and improved cultivars of both flesh types are actively sought. This paper focuses on evidence that the flesh color locus also controls senescent leaf color (easily observed in the fall) and hypanthium color. In two progeny populations totaling 115 progeny plus their parents, the three traits co-segregated completely. Trees carrying the dominant allele for white flesh had yellow senescent leaves and yellow hypanthia, while homozygous recessive yellow-fleshed types exhibited orange senescent leaves and orange hypanthia. Senescent leaf color was also measured quantitatively, with major colorimetric differences observed between white-fleshed and yellow-fleshed progeny. Senescent leaf hue angle and reflected light wavelengths of 500 to 560 nm were the parameters most affected by the flesh color locus. Results were verified with 10 white-fleshed and 10 yellow-fleshed cultivars. The findings show that the Y locus in peach controls the type and concentration of carotenoids in multiple organs, including fruit, leaves, and flowers. The ability to discriminate between white and yellow flesh color using a simple visual method, applicable in plants not yet at reproductive maturity, is valuable to breeders wanting to save time, growing space, and money.

Free access

Cameron P. Peace, Carlos H. Crisosto, Fredrick A. Bliss and Thomas M. Gradziel

Candidate gene (CG) analysis can be an efficient approach for identifying genes controlling important traits in fruit production. Three chronological steps have been described for determining candidate genes for a trait—proposing, screening, and validating—and we have applied these to the problem of internal breakdown of peach and nectarine. Internal breakdown (IB), also known as chilling injury, is the collective term for various disorders that occur during prolonged cold storage and/or after subsequent ripening of stone fruit. Symptoms include mealiness, browning, and bleeding. Candidate genes for IB symptoms were proposed based on knowledge of the biochemical or physiological pathways leading to phenotypic expression of the traits. Gene sequences for proposed CGs were obtained primarily from the Genome Database for Rosaceae. Screening the CGs involved identifying polymorphism within a progeny population, relying mainly on simple PCR tests. Several polymorphic CGs were located on a peach linkage map and compared with phenotypic variation for IB susceptibility. A major QTL for mealiness coincided with the Freestone-Melting flesh locus, which itself is likely to be controlled by a CG encoding endopolygalacturonase, an enzyme involved in pectin degradation. Further gene sequences positioned on the consensus linkage map of Prunus by other researchers were co-located with QTLs for IB traits. Validation of the role of identified CGs will require detailed physiological or transgenic studies.

Restricted access

Esmaeil Fallahi

reserves disappear. This is only possible if peace prevails in the region. Recent lifting of the multinational sanctions against Iran has partially opened the doors to numerous horticultural business opportunities with Iranian scientists, private sectors

Free access

Sriyani Rajapakse, Albert Abbott, John Kelly and Robert Ballard

The feasibility of using RFLP to distinguish genetically related Hybrid Tea rose cultivars for DNA `fingerprinting' was examined with a group of cultivars related to `Peace'. The following cultivars used in this study, `Chicago Peace', `Flaming Peace', `Climbing Peace' and `Lucky Piece', were derived from bud mutations (sports) of `Peace'. We also investigated two additional cultivars, `Perfume Delight' and `Garden Party', in which one of the parents for each was `Peace'. Genomic rose DNA probes, cloned in pUC8 plasmid of Escherichia coli, were hybridized with genomic DNA of these cultivars digested with different restriction enzymes. Although polymorphisms were observed among these related cultivars, only a few probe/enzyme combinations screened produced RFLPs due to the high degree of genetic relatedness of these cultivars. We have identified probes that can distinguish all of these related rose cultivars. This study demonstrates that RFLP markers can be used effectively in DNA `fingerprinting' of genetically related rose cultivars, eventhough the level of detectable polymorphism is quite low.

Free access

H. Brent Pembcrton, George L. Philley and William E. Roberson

Plants of field grown rose cultivars Blaze, Gold Glow, Queen Elizabeth, Mr. Lincoln, Montezuma, Don Juan, Chicago Peace, and Pink Peace endured two major freezes. Temperatures fell to -13°C on 16 December 1989 and as low as -20°C during an extended period from 17 to 28 December 1989 when the highest temperature reached was 5°. Grade 1 plants of each cultivar were harvested on 5 January 1990. At harvest, discoloration of the pith, xylem ray parenchyma and bud union tissue was assessed. Additional plants were then potted and forced in a glasshouse at 15° night temperalure with venting at 21° during the day. At the end of the initial flush of growth, which was defined as either the opening of the first flower or the determination that all new shoots were blind, new growth was rated and measured. Blaze exhibited minimal damage with only slight pith discoloration. The total number of flowering shoots (TNFS) for Blaze was 5.5 per plant which is an expected number from a grade 1 plant. Of the other cultivars. Gold Glow and Pink Peace exhibited pith, xylem, and bud union damage with up to 50% cane dieback, but produced flowering shoots from the graft union. However, only half the expected TNFS per plant were produced. The remaining cultivars also exhibited higher damage levels than Blaze which resulted in reduced shoot numbers and flowering. Only Blaze plants received an acceptable plant marketability rating.