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Douglas D. Archbold, Thomas R. Hamilton-Kemp, Ann M. Clements and Randy W. Collins

Seedless table grapes (Vitis vinifera L.) cv. Crimson Seedless were exposed to (E)-2-hexenal vapor during cold storage to determine its potential as a fumigant for long-term control of postharvest mold. Fruit were fumigated with 0.86 or 1.71 mmol (100 or 200 μL neat compound, respectively) (E)-2-hexenal per 1.1-L container for 2 weeks during 2 °C storage. Containers were moved to 20 °C storage after 4, 8, and 12 weeks for determination of mold incidence and berry quality over 12 days. The headspace concentration of (E)-2-hexenal, measured by gas chromatography, reached a maximum of 2.5 and 4.2 μmol·L–1 for 0.86 and 1.71 mmol per container, respectively, after 1 day and declined to <1 μmol·L–1 for both treatments by 14 days. Upon removal from cold storage at 4, 8, and 12 weeks, the incidence of mold was significantly lower for (E)-2-hexenal–treated fruit. Control of mold by (E)-2-hexenal fumigation persisted through 12 days of 20 °C storage, even though mold generally increased in all treatments. The two levels of (E)-2-hexenal were similar in their suppression of mold. Fumigation did not affect O2 or CO2 concentrations within the containers, nor were fruit firmness or soluble solids content affected. Postharvest fumigation of seedless table grapes with the natural volatile compound (E)-2-hexenal shows promise for control of mold.

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N.K. Dokoozlian and W.L. Peacock

Excessive fruit set can reduce the quality of 'Crimson Seedless' table grapes (Vitis vinifera L.), resulting in compact, tightly filled clusters with small berries that are prone to bunch rot at harvest. Two separate studies were conducted to examine the effects of application timing and rate on the efficacy of GA3 for berry thinning. In the first experiment, vines were treated with 2 g·ha-1 GA3 at one of the following stages of bloom: 1% to 5%; 20% to 30%; 50% to 60%; 80% to 90%; or 100% capfall (falling of the calyptra). The second experiment compared treatments of 0, 2.5, 6.25, 12.5, 18.75, or 25 g·ha-1 GA3 applied at ≈80% bloom. Fruit set (number of berries/cm shoulder length) was similar among vines treated between 1% to 5% and 100% bloom with 2 g·ha-1 GA3, although berry set was reduced relative to the control. However, applications made during the later stages of bloom significantly increased berry length and weight. Fruit set generally declined, and the number of shot berries per cluster increased, as the amount of GA3 applied at bloom increased. Applications ≥6.25 g·ha-1 GA3 resulted in commercially unacceptable levels of shot berries, as well as significant reductions in cluster weight and packable yield per vine. The results indicate that a single application of 2.5 g·ha-1 GA3 near full bloom may be used to reduce fruit set and increase berry size of this cultivar without detrimental effects on packable yield or cluster number per vine the subsequent year. Chemical name used: gibberellic acid (GA3).

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Matthew W. Fidelibus, Kimberley A. Cathline and Jacqueline K. Burns

Seedless’ experiment. A second experiment was conducted in a 14-year-old vineyard of own-rooted ‘Crimson Seedless’ table grapes on open-gable trellises. Individual clusters of grapes were sprayed to runoff with one of four solutions containing 0, 1125

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David W. Ramming, Ronald Tarailo and Sayed A. Badr

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Jonathan Tong, Cyril Rakovski and Anuradha Prakash

to 3000 Gy. Overall acceptance of the blueberries, however, was unaffected below 750 Gy. Similarly, grapes have a high tolerance to low-dose irradiation. Kim et al. (2014) found that ‘Crimson Seedless’ and ‘Sugraone’ varieties tolerated irradiation

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Renata Koyama, Ronan Carlos Colombo, Wellington Fernando Silva Borges, João Pedro Silvestre, Ibrar Hussain, Muhammad Shahab, Saeed Ahmed, Sandra Helena Prudencio, Reginaldo Teodoro de Souza and Sergio Ruffo Roberto

other areas of this region ( Ahmed et al., 2019 ; Kishino et al., 2019 ). The number of cultivars of seedless grapes available for cultivation in Brazil is limited, with ‘Thompson Seedless’, ‘Crimson Seedless’, and ‘Superior Seedless’ grapes standing

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Gayle M. Volk, James W. Olmstead, Chad E. Finn and Jules Janick

’ strawberry (John Clark, University of Arkansas); ( F ) ‘Chandler’ strawberry (USDA Image Gallery); ( G ) ‘Chandler’ walnut (Lori Eason, Gold River Orchards); ( H ) ‘Chester Thornless’ blackberry (Chad Finn, USDA-ARS); ( I ) ‘Crimson Seedless’ grape (USDA

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Renata Koyama, Adriane Marinho de Assis, Lilian Yukari Yamamoto, Wellington Fernando Borges, Rogério de Sá Borges, Sandra Helena Prudêncio and Sergio Ruffo Roberto

. Similar results were observed in ‘Red Globe’, ‘Flame Seedless’, ‘Crimson Seedless’, and ‘Hongisul’ table grapes ( Peppi et al., 2007 , 2008 ; Peppi and Fidelibus, 2008 ; Shin and Park, 2012 ). Table 2. Lightness ( L* ), chroma ( C* ), and hue angle ( h

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Jae-Yun Heo and Sung-Min Park

Korean markets have recently shown a strong demand for grapes with large-sized seedless fruits ( Heo and Park, 2015 ), and several attempts to introduce world-class seedless grape cultivars, such as Thompson Seedless and Crimson Seedless, have been

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Bayram Murat Asma, Zehra Tuğba Murathan, Tuncay Kan, Fırat Ege Karaat, Ogün Birhanlı and Abdullah Erdoğan

Chilling estimation: Its importance and estimation The Texas Hort. 18 8 9 Jayasena, V. Cameron, I. 2008 Brix/acid ratio as a predictor of consumer acceptability of crimson seedless table grapes J. Food Qual. 31 736 750 Ledbetter, C.A. 2008 Apricots, p. 39