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Doug S. Foulk and Emily E. Hoover

`Haralson,' the most widely-grown cultivar in Minnesota, is highly susceptible to russetting and cracking in many orchards. Because wax platelet arrangement has been proposed as a cause for russettting in `Golden Delicious' apples, we examined the wax platelet arrangement of `Haralson' apples. When compared to the wax platelet arrangement found on the russet-susceptible `Golden Delicious,' and on `McIntosh,' a cultivar which does not russet in our region, `Haralson' platelets were large and upright in orientation, more numerous than found on `Golden Delicious,' but unlike the smaller, more granular platelets found on `McIntosh.' In a concurrent study, we made four GA,,, (Provide) applications, at petal fall and at p.f. +10, 20, and 30 days. At harvest, the treated and untreated blocks of trees were examined for incidence of russet, 25-ct. wt., and total yield per tree. Treated trees produced a greater number of fruit of slightly larger size and with reduced incidence of russet than untreated trees in the study.

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Paul R. Cabe, Andrew Baumgarten, Kyle Onan, James J. Luby, and David S. Bedford

We used microsatellite loci to investigate the parentage of the apple cultivar `Honeycrisp', a patented University of Minnesota introduction. In an attempt to find the correct parents, we also examined other apple varieties associated with the University of Minnesota apple breeding program. Based on written records from the 1960s, the presumed parents of `Honeycrisp' were `Honeygold' and `Macoun'. We were able to exclude both of these as parents, but found that `Keepsake' was consistent as one of the parents. A second potential parent could not be discovered. `Haralson', another commercially important cultivar from the University of Minnesota, is likely from a cross between `Malinda' and `Wealthy'.

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Jonathan Magby, Gayle M. Volk, Adam Henk, and Steve Miller

cultivars were Haralson, Patten’s Greening, Yellow Transparent, Northwestern Greening, McMahon, Whitney Crab, Dolgo, McIntosh Red, Wolf River, Dutchess of Oldenburg, Charlamoff, Martha, Virginia Crab, and Anoka ( Table 2 ). In Wyoming, Wealthy, Haralson, and

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Doug S. Foulk and Emily E. Hoover

This decision case concerns the need to make management decisions in a commercial apple orchard planted largely with `Haralson,' a russet-susceptible cultivar. The growers described in this situation had to decide whether applying GA4+7 for russet suppression was appropriate for their operation, given the financial, cultural and pesticide issues that required addressing. The case is intended for use in fruit production or other intermediate to advanced undergraduate horticulture courses and assumes a knowledge of basic perennial-crop production practices. Students assume the role of a decisionmaker in the complicated issue of orchard management.

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Emily Hoover and Doug Foulk

Decision cases have been written for use in horticulture education for some time at the Univ. of Minnesota. How faculty involve graduate students in this process will be discussed using the decision case Sunny Hollow Orchard. This decision case concerns the need to make management decisions in a commercial apple orchard planted largely with Haralson, a russet-susceptible cultivar. The growers involved had to decide whether the application of GA4+7 for russet suppression was appropriate for their operation, given all the factors which required addressing. The case was written for use in fruit production or other intermediate-to-advanced undergraduate course. The case can be used to illustrate the decision-making processes involved in operating a commercial crop production enterprise encompassing such issues as cultural and environmental factors, financial viability and pesticide concerns. The case exposes students to a real-life situation and provides them with the opportunity to face a complex but not uncommon situation for producers in the horticultural industry. We will then focus on how this case fit into the entire PhD research program and how we hope to integrate this kind of experience into graduate education.

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Chengyan Yue and Cindy Tong

’, ‘Cortland’, ‘Fuji’, ‘Gala’, ‘Ginger Gold’, ‘Haralson’, ‘Honeycrisp’ (organic and conventional), ‘Jazz™’, ‘SnowSweet®’, ‘Sweet Sixteen’, ‘SweeTango®’, and ‘Zestar!™’. Of these, ‘Connell Red’, ‘Cortland’, ‘Ginger Gold’, ‘Haralson’, conventionally grown

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Maria M. Jenderek, Phil Forsline, Joseph Postman, Ed Stover, and David Ellis

dormancy, DB from trees grown in either Corvallis or Davis attained this physiological requirement. In a study on Haralson apple cold acclimation ( Pyrus malus L.), short day and frost were suggested to regulate the acclimation process ( Howell and Weiser

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Renae E. Moran, Bryan J. Peterson, Gennaro Fazio, and John A. Cline

), and ‘Golden Delicious’ ( Ketchie, 1985 ) and ‘Haralson’ apples ( Quamme et al., 1972 ). However, in quince, the three shoot tissues are similar in hardiness in late winter ( Einhorn et al., 2011 ). Under controlled conditions, birch phloem deacclimates