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Hannah R. Swegarden, Craig C. Sheaffer, and Thomas E. Michaels

bean ( Phaseolus vulgaris ) cultivars included in the 2013–14 yield trials. Seed descriptors (seed size, shape, weight, coat color, coat patter, corona color, length, width, and thickness) were evaluated from 2012 original seed stock (n = 15) and 2013

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Kyle M. VandenLangenberg, Paul C. Bethke, and James Nienhuis

and Hopp, 1961 ). In general, if sweetness is perceived in a vegetable, even mildly, it may be enough to encourage consumption ( Dinehart et al., 2006 ). Sensory panelists, who preferred dry bean ( Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and edamame [ Glycine max (L

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Kerrie McDaniel and David Lightfoot

Physiological differences between cttokinins are well documented. An explanation for these differences is that cytokinins differentially regulate genes. Gene response has been analyzed in cell culture and organized tissue of Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv. Great Northern. Two novel cDNAs, L-221 and L-22, have been identified that are cytokinin responsive. In leaf tissue L-221 was repressed by zeatin, benzyladenine and thidiazuron at 50 μM. In suspension cell culture mRNA abundance of L-221 remained constant regardless of cytokinin treatment. By contrast, the abundance of L-22 mRNA was increased differentially by treatment with each of the 3 cytokinins in leaf tissue. Suspension cells analyzed for expression of L-22 after cytokinin treatment also showed differential gene expression. S-1 Nuclease Protection Assays revealed that gene expression is a transient phenomenon dependent upon the time of cytokinin application and cytokinin concentration. Callus bioassays showed that dihydrozeatin and O-glucosylzeatin gave greater responses than the co-application of zeatin and dihydrozeatin or zeatin and O-glucosylzeatin. The conjugate and the reduction derivative also gave greater responses than zeatin alone. Effects of dihydrozeatin and O-glucosylzeatin on gene expression will be reported.

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Jesse Vorwald and James Nienhuis

Nuña beans are a type of common bean ( Phaseolus vulgaris L.) native to the Andean region of South America that possess the unusual property of popping when exposed to heat ( National Research Council, 1989 ). Popped nuñas are a snack food similar

Open access

Wesley Gartner, Paul C. Bethke, Theodore J. Kisha, and James Nienhuis

al., 2012 ). Days after flowering is an additional measure of maturity that has been used for comparisons among genotypes, although variation in rates of maturity could result in biased comparisons. Fruits of Phaseolus vulgaris contain a single

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MiAe Cho, Brandon M. Hurr, Jiwon Jeong, Chaill Lim, and Donald J. Huber

Green or common beans ( Phaseolus vulgaris L.) are harvested at a physiologically immature stage of development. Growth is rapid at the time of harvest and beans exhibit comparatively high respiration rates, even when held at low temperatures

Open access

Xiu Ying Shen and Barbara D. Webster

Abstract

In the article “Effects of Water Stress on Pollen of Phaseolus vulgaris L.”, by Xiu Ying Shen and Barbara D. Webster (J. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 111:807–810, September 1986), on p. 808, the last sentence before Results and Discussion should read: “The term microspore refers to the uninucleate structures released from tetrads after meiosis. The term pollen grain refers to the above structures after mitosis of the microspore nucleus and formation of the vegetative (tube) and generative cells.”

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R. A. Reinert, J. A. Dunning, W. W. Heck, P. S. Benepal, and M. Rangappa

Abstract

Ozone (O3) is the most damaging air pollutant affecting agricultural crops in the United States and bean is one of the most O3-sensitive crop species. More than 2000 plant introductions of Phaseolus vulgaris L. were evaluated for sensitivity to O3 by exposing bean plants to 0.6 ppm O3 for 2 hours under controlled environmental conditions; 54 insensitive and 67 highly sensitive plant introductions were identified based on foliar injury symptoms.

Open access

Henry A. Robitaille

Abstract

Flowering in many plants can be geotropically influenced. Apple limbs are tied down as a commercial practice to increase flowering, and pineapple plants tipped on their sides flowered earlier than those grown upright (5). Flowering at the lower nodes of soybean plants was improved after weights were used to make stem tips grow downward (1). In apple (2) and pineapple (3) there is evidence that the geotropic stimulation may be mediated through ethylene. The effect of horizontal placement of plants on flowering of Phaseolus vulgaris was investigated, since ethephon treatments have increased flowering in that plant (4).

Open access

Barbara D. Webster, Ryan M. Ross, and Thomas Evans

Abstract

The discoid nectary of Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Red Kidney, produces nectar comprised of sugars, amino acids, protein, lipids, reducing acids, phenols, and alkaloids. Nectar is secreted through open stomates located near the inner and outer rims of the shallowly lobed nectary. Closed stomates are present on external and internal flanks of the nectary. Nectar production by this autogamous cultivar is anomolous, since such production usually exists to attract pollinators to ensure transfer of germ cells. Honey bees and bumblebees which regularly visit the plants for nectar are provided with a highly nutritious resource, apparently at the expense of the plant. Diversion of energy for nectar production thus appears to be an unrewarded expense to this cultivar.