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Prunus salicina Lindl. is native to Yunan and distributed in southwestern provinces in China where it has been cultivated for many years. Gummosis is a global disease, which occurs mainly on the tree trunk, main branch, and the collateral. At the

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Plum ( Prunus salicina ) is one of the most important stone fruits cultivated worldwide ( Li et al., 2015 ). Plum fruits are rich in fiber and polyphenolics ( Kim et al., 2003 ; Stacewicz-Sapuntzakis et al., 2001 ) and are becoming increasingly

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Self-incompatibility (SI) is the ability of a fertile hermaphrodite flowering plant to prevent self-fertilization by discriminating between self and nonself pollen. Japanese plum ( Prunus salicina Lindl.), a species of the Rosaceae family

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Plum [ Prunus salicina Lindl. (syn. Prunus triflora Roxb. or Prunus thibetica Franch.)], commonly known as chinese plum or japanese plum, is a diploid (2 n = 2 x = 16) fruit tree native to China. It is one of the most important stone fruit

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resistant to rain cracking and ripening synchronously ( Zhang et al., 2008 ). Small fruit size (0.4–2.85 g) has been one of the major factors limiting its development. Prunus salicina is one of the important commercial stone fruits both in China and

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Abstract

The wheat coleoptile straight-growth test was used to determine the effects of (2-chloroethyl)phosphonic acid (ethephon) on endogenous auxins and inhibitors in seeds of ‘Late Santa Rosa’ plum. Seeds of both developing and abscissing ethephon-treated fruits attained higher levels of auxin activity than did their respective controls suggesting an ethylene-induced inhibition of auxin transport. The level of growth inhibitors remained similar throughout.

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Evaluation of progeny resulting from controlled crosses and selfs of various plum (Prunus salicina and hybrids) cultivars revealed that resistance to black knot Apisporina morbosa (Schw.) is controlled by a single recessive gene (proposed designation bk) in the resistant cultivars studied. `Bruce', `Munson', `Crimson', and `Ozark Premier' were homozygous resistant (bkbk), while `Methley' was susceptible and heterozygous (Bkbk) for the trait.

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Japanese plum (Prunus salicina Lindel. `Casselman') trees exposed to three atmospheric ozone partial pressure treatments were sprayed with a summer application of Volck Supreme oil (1% aqueous solution) to control an outbreak of spider mites (Tetranychus spp.). Phytotoxic effects were observed on the foliage of trees in the plots exposed to ambient or higher atmospheric ozone partial pressures 5 days following spray application. Foliage on trees exposed to 0.044 and 0.081 μPa·Pa-1 ozone [12-h mean (8 Apr. to 12 June 1992)] partial pressures developed water spotting and more foliage abscission than trees exposed to charcoal-filtered air (0.024 μPa·Pa-1 ozone). Thus, ozone air-pollution stress may predispose plants to increased phytotoxicity from summer oils.

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Fumigation with 1 mg·L-1 of thymol vapor retarded mycelial growth of Monilinia fructicola (G. Wint.) Honey. Mean colony diameter was reduced from 49 mm in the control to 13 mm when the conidia were cultured on potato dextrose agar. Fumigation of apricots (Prunus armeniaca L.) with 2 mg·L-1 of thymol vapor reduced the germination of M. fructicola conidia to 2% compared with 98% on untreated fruit. Microscopic observations showed that the spores fumigated with thymol were shrunken and had collapsed protoplasts. In in vivo experiments, surface-sterilized apricots and plums (Prunus salicina L.) were inoculated with conidia of M. fructicola by applying 20 μL of a spore suspension to wounds on the fruit, and then were fumigated with thymol or acetic acid. The incidence of brown rot was reduced to 3% and 32% when `Manch' apricots were fumigated with thymol or acetic acid at 5 mg·L-1, respectively, compared with 64% incidence in untreated fruit. Fumigation of `Violette' plums with thymol or acetic acid at 8 mg·L-1 reduced brown rot from 88% in the control to 24% and 25%, respectively. Fumigation of `Veeblue' plums with thymol at 4 mg·L-1 reduced brown rot from 56% in the control to 14%. Fumigation of apricots with thymol resulted in firmer fruit and higher surface browning, but total soluble solids and titratable acidity were not affected. Fumigation of plum with thymol resulted in higher total soluble solids, but firmness and titratable acidity were not affected. Thymol fumigation caused phytotoxicity on apricots but not on plums.

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Analysis of a five-parent diallel in a greenhouse estimated general and specific combining ability (GCA and SCA) effects for resistance of Japanese plum (Prunus salicina Lindl. and hybrids) to Xanthomonas campestris pv. pruni (Smith) Dye stem canker, as measured by length of inoculated cankers, canker appearance rating, and canker expansion rate. `Friar' and `Gulfruby' were the most susceptible parents. `Burbank', `Wilson', and' Wade' had similar GCA values for length of inoculated cankers, but' Wade' was the superior parent in transmitting canker resistance, as measured by canker appearance rating. SCA was not important in determining the performance of a cross. Canker appearance rating was the best measure of resistance in the greenhouse tests and provided a greater separation of GCA estimates and lower coefficient of variation.

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