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Darush Struss, Riaz Ahmad, Stephen M. Southwick, and Manuela Boritzki

Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and amplified fragment-length polymorphisms (AFLPs) were used to evaluate sweet cherry (Prunus avium L.) cultivars using quality DNA extracted from fruit flesh and leaves. SSR markers were developed from a phage library using genomic DNA of the sweet cherry cultivar Valerij Tschkalov. Microsatellite containing clones were sequenced and 15 specific PCR primers were selected for identification of cultivars in sweet cherry and for cross-species amplification in Prunus. In total, 48 alleles were detected by 15 SSR primer pairs, with an average of 3.2 putative alleles per primer combination. The number of putative alleles ranged from one to five in the tested cherry cultivars. Forty polymorphic fragments were scored in the tested cherry cultivars by 15 SSRs. All sweet cherry cultivars were identified by SSRs from their unique fingerprints. We also demonstrated that the technique of using DNA from fruit flesh for analysis can be used to maintain product purity in the market place by comparing DNA fingerprints from 12 samples of `Bing' fruit collected from different grocery stores in the United States to that of a standard `Bing' cultivar. Results indicated that, with one exception, all `Bing'samples were similar to the standard. Amplification of more than 80% of the sweet cherry primer pairs in plum (P. salicina), apricot (P. armeniaca) and peach (P. persica L.) showed a congeneric relationship within Prunus species. A total of 63 (21%) polymorphic fragments were recorded in 15 sweet cherry cultivars using four EcoRI-MseI AFLP primer combinations. AFLP markers generated unique fingerprints for all sweet cherry cultivars. SSRs and AFLP polymorphic fragments were used to calculate a similarity matrix and to perform UPGMA cluster analysis. Most of the cultivars were grouped according to their pedigree. The SSR and AFLP molecular markers can be used for the grouping and identification of sweet cherry cultivars as a complement to pomological studies. The new SSRs developed here could be used in cherry as well as in other Prunus species for linkage mapping, evolutionary and taxonomic study.

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Sara Spiegel, Dan Thompson, Aniko Varga, and Delano James

An apple chlorotic leaf spot virus (ACLSV) isolate was detected by TAS-ELISA and RT-PCR in an ornamental dwarf flowering almond (Prunus glandulosa Thunb.). This plant, maintained at the Centre for Plant Health, Sidney, B.C., Canada, has been showing transient leaf symptoms during the spring seasons. A 390-bp fragment and a 1,350-bp product, in the RNA polymerase and the coat protein viral coding regions, respectively, were amplified by RT-PCR from the infected plant. A sequence comparison of the 390-bp fragment of this ACLSV isolate (designated as AL1292) with other published isolates, revealed a similarity of 81% to 84% at the nucleotide level and 88% to 100% at the amino acid level. In contrast to other ACLSV isolates, AL1292 has an exceptionally narrow range of experimental herbaceous and woody hosts, as determined by mechanical and graft inoculation assays. These standard bioassays may not be effective for the detection of the AL1292 isolate because of its limited host range. The results we report in this paper confirm P. glandulosa as a natural host of this virus. Currently it is not known how ACLSV is spread, other than by bud-grafting and possibly by root grafts. The use of virus-tested source plants for the preparation of planting material will minimize its spread.

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Carolina Fernández, Jorge Pinochet, Daniel Esmenjaud, George Salesses, and Antonio Felipe

New Prunus rootstocks and selections were evaluated for their reaction to Meloidogyne arenaria (Neal) Chitwood, M. incognita (Kofoid & White Chitwood), or M. javanica (Treub) Chitwood. Most of the clones were peach-almond hybrids (P-AHs) [P. persica (L.) Batsch × P. dulcis (Mill.) D.A. Webb] or plums of Spanish and French origin. In a first experiment, the P-AH Hansen 2-168 and plums GF-31 (P. cerasifera Ehr.) and GF 8-1 (P. cerasifera × P. munsoniana Weigth et Hedr.) were highly resistant to the mixture of five isolates of M. javanica. The P-AHs Barrier and Titan × Nemared were resistant and moderately resistant, respectively; GF-677, MB 3-13, MB 2-2, and MB 2-6 were susceptible. In the second and third experiment, the plums P 1079, P 2175, the hybrids Afgano (P. dasycarpa Ehrh.), G × N No 22, and G × N No 15, both P-AHs, and Nemared peach were highly resistant to mixtures of five isolates of M. incognita or M. arenaria. The plums P 2980 (P. cerasifera) and GF 8-1 tested against either root-knot species were also highly resistant. Cachirulo × (G × N No 9), a P-AH, showed less resistance to M. arenaria than to M. incognita. Montclar (P. persica) and the P-AHs Torrents AC and GF-677 were susceptible to both species.

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Jordi Canals, Jorge Pinochet, and Antonio Felipe

The influence of temperature and age of the plant was determined on nematode reproduction on a susceptible almond (Prunus amygdalus Batsch.) and on a resistant peach-almond hybrid (P. persica Stok. × P. amygdalus Batsch.) rootstock inoculated with Meloidogyne javanica (Treub) Chitwood. Experiments were conducted under greenhouse conditions in heated and unheated sand beds. `Garrigues' almond inoculated with 3000 nematodes per plant showed extensive galling, high final nematode population levels, and high counts of nematodes per gram of root at 27 and 32C. The hybrid G × N No. 1 showed minimal galling and reproduction at 27C but higher levels of galling and final population and nematode counts per gram of root at 32C, suggesting a partial loss of resistance with temperature increase. One-month-old and 1-year-old plants of `Garrigues' were susceptible following inoculation with 2000 nematodes per plant, although plantlets (l-month) were significantly more affected. Plantlets of hybrid G × N No. 1 were also susceptible, but 1-year-old plants were resistant. Resistant genotypes (G × N selections) seem to require root tissue maturation before expressing full resistance.

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Qijing Zhang and Dajun Gu

Prunus tomentosa Thunb. (2 n = 16) and P. salicina Lindl. (2 n = 16) of the family Rosaceae belong to different subgenera. Prunus tomentosa is in the subgenus Cerasus , while P. salicina is in the subgenus Prunophora ( Ingram, 1948

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Arancha Arbeloa, Ma Elena Daorden, Elena García, Pilar Andreu, and Juan A. Marín

grape varieties. In all these cases, embryo rescue has been successfully used to overcome the low viability of these seeds ( Ramming, 1990 ). In Prunus , since the early Tukey experiments ( Tukey, 1933 ), there have been a number of examples of the use

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Wenhao Dai, Victoria Magnusson, and Chris Johnson

Chokecherry ( Prunus virginiana L.) is a small tree or large shrub widely distributed across the northern Great Plains in the United States and Canada. Native to North America, chokecherry is well adapted to a variety of severe conditions such as

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Justin A. Schulze, Jason D. Lattier, and Ryan N. Contreras

Common cherrylaurel ( Prunus laurocerasus L.) and Portuguese cherrylaurel ( P. lusitanica L.), collectively referred to as cherrylaurels, are highly adaptable and important ornamental species in the United States and Europe. Cherrylaurels are

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Sergio Jiménez, Jorge Pinochet, Anunciación Abadía, María Ángeles Moreno, and Yolanda Gogorcena

-Ractivity in 17 commercial and experimental Prunus rootstocks. The results obtained with the screening protocol were compared with leaf SPAD readings obtained under field conditions that induced iron chlorosis. Materials and Methods Plant material

Open access

Gregory T. Browne

More than 10 species of Phytophthora de Bary are reported to affect cultivated Prunus L. worldwide, causing root rot, crown rot, trunk and scaffold cankers, and even fruit rots ( Browne and Doster, 2002 ; Browne and Mircetich, 1995 ; Félix