Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 10 items for :

  • " Pisolithus tinctorius " x
  • Refine by Access: All x
Clear All
Free access

Sven E. Svenson, Fred T. Davies Jr., and Calvin E. Meier

The influence of ectomycorrhizae on drought acclimation was studied in an open-pollinated family of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.). Seedlings inoculated with Pisolithus tinctorius (Pers.) Coker and Couch (Pt) maintained a higher shoot relative growth rate under high and low soil moisture regimes. However, fascicle area, shoot and root mass, and fascicle nutrient elemental content were similar for seedlings inoculated with Pt and noninoculated seedlings. Seedlings under low soil moisture were drought-acclimated by five 11-day drought cycles. During peak water deficit (cycle 6), drought-acclimated, Pt-inoculated seedlings had the lowest predawn fascicle water potential (ψ pd), conserved water with lowest bulk fascicle diffusive conductance (g), and maintained low g and transpiration (E) during recovery (cycle 6). Enhanced drought acclimation of Pt-inoculated seedlings was independent of plant size and fascicle nutrient content.

Free access

D.D. Crunkilton, H.E. Garrett, and S.G. Pallardy

Ectomycorrhizal and nonmycorrhizal, glasshouse-grown northern red oak seedlings (Quercus rubra L.) received root treatments of IBA in starch, fired-montmorillonite clay, or starch-encapsulated montmorillonite clay. Clay proved to be superior to starch as a carrier for IBA, inducing significant increases in diameter, root length, leaf area, and shoot dry weight. Positive growth interactions between mycorrhizae and IBA were found with the clay carrier. The typical bare-rooted red oak seedling (grown for 1 year in nurseries and outplanted) performs poorly because of insufficient root size. Container-grown seedlings produced using clay/IBA treatments may perform better under field conditions than stock grown conventionally. Chemical name used: indole-3-butyric acid (IBA).

Free access

Sven E. Svenson and F. T. Davies Jr.

Pinus taeda L. seedlings inoculated with the ectomycorrhizal fungus, Pisolithus tinctorius, were grown in a glasshouse for eight months, and then subjected to rapidly developing cyclic water deficits, or to a single slowly developing water deficit. Water deficits developed at a rate of -0.16 MPa per day (predawn total water potential) for five cyclic water deficits, and at -0.04 MPa per day for the slow water deficit. In unstressed seedlings, carbon exchange rates (CER) did not differ between noninoculated and inoculated seedlings. During slow water deficit development, CER steadily declined. During rapid water deficit development, CER remained unchanged, then declined rapidly when water potentials fell below -1.3 MPa. Inoculated seedlings had higher CER when water potential was lower than -1.5 MPa.

Free access

Sven E. Svenson and F. T. Davies Jr.

Pinus taeda L. seedlings inoculated with the ectomycorrhizal fungus, Pisolithus tinctorius, were grown in a glasshouse for eight months, and then subjected to rapidly developing cyclic water deficits, or to a single slowly developing water deficit. Water deficits developed at a rate of -0.16 MPa per day (predawn total water potential) for five cyclic water deficits, and at -0.04 MPa per day for the slow water deficit. In unstressed seedlings, carbon exchange rates (CER) did not differ between noninoculated and inoculated seedlings. During slow water deficit development, CER steadily declined. During rapid water deficit development, CER remained unchanged, then declined rapidly when water potentials fell below -1.3 MPa. Inoculated seedlings had higher CER when water potential was lower than -1.5 MPa.

Free access

Henry E. DeVries II, Joseph P. Lardner, and Kenneth W. Mudge

To test the hypothesis that phytohormone production is related to mycorrhizae formation 29 isolates of ectomycorrhizal fungi have been evaluated for production of ethylene and auxin in pure culture and for their ability to form ectomycorrhizae with Pinus mugo. The fungi tested included a series of monokaryotic isolates of Laccaria bicolor and dikaryotic isolates of Amanita muscaria, Hebeloma crustuliniforme, L. laccata, L. proxima, Pisolithus tinctorius, Rhizopogon ellenae, and R. vinicolor. Inoculated root systems were rated for mycorrhizae formation, root/shoot ratio and root morphology. P. tinctorius isolates which formed abundant mycorrhizae produce no ethylene in vitro, but did produce the auxin IAA. L. bicolor isolates produced ethylene as well as auxins putatively identified as IAA, and IBA. Correlations between phytohormone production and mycorrhizogenicity will be presented.

Free access

Humberto Núñez-Moreno, James L. Walworth, Andrew P. Pond, and Michael W. Kilby

“conventional” to “organic” production. This may be related to the high Zn concentrations in 2008, although it does not explain the increase from 2005 to 2006. In 2008, numerous fruiting bodies of the ectomycorrhizal fungi Pisolithus tinctorius and

Free access

Humberto Núñez-Moreno, James L. Walworth, and Andrew P. Pond

in activity of earthworms has been observed. Also, mycorrhizae activity is now apparent, because fruiting bodies of ectomycorrhizal Pisolithus tinctorius and Scleroderma bovista are now found in the orchard. Mycorrhizae can have a profound effect

Free access

R. Kasten Dumroese, Douglass F. Jacobs, and Anthony S. Davis

116 Lesueur, D. Duponnois, R. 2005 Relations between rhizobial nodulation and root colonization of Acacia crassicarpa provenances by an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus, Glomus intraradices Schenk and Smith or an ectomycorrhizal fungus, Pisolithus

Free access

M. Lenny Wells

with feeder-root necrosis of pecan. Sharpe and Marx (1986) demonstrated enhanced growth and mineral nutrient content of pecan seedlings by inoculation of trees with Pisolithus tinctorius ectomycorrhizae. Arbuscular mychorrhizae have not been

Open access

Jiaxin Li, Yingli Ma, and Yinfeng Xie

within root systems of Eucalyptus pilularis plants ectomycorrhizal with Pisolithus tinctorius New Phytol. 112 495 500 Chen, F. Huang, G.L. 2019 Antioxidant activity of polysaccharides from different sources of ginseng Intl. J. Biol