Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 28 items for :

  • " Lens culinaris " x
  • Refine by Access: All x
Clear All
Free access

S. Brauner, R.L. Murphy, J.G. Walling, J. Przyborowski, and N.F. Weeden

DNA primers for 37 genes have been developed in pea (Pisum sativum L.). Two-thirds of these primers also amplify orthologous sequences in lentil (Lens culinaris). The primers were designed to be complementary to highly conserved sequences in exons of known genes. In addition, most of the priming sequences were selected to be 1000 to 3000 bp distant on the genomic DNA and to amplify a fragment that contained at least one intron. Segregating sequence polymorphism in mapping populations of recombinant inbred lines (RILs) derived from wide crosses in Pisum was observed by restriction of the amplified fragment with endonucleases recognizing four-base restriction sites. Successful mapping of 36 of these genes in pea demonstrated the utility of these primers for mapping, and it appears likely that the primers should have general utility for comparative mapping in legumes.

Free access

Steven J. Guldan, Charles A. Martin, Jose Cueto-Wong, and Robert L. Steiner

Five legumes [hairy vetch (Vicia villosa Roth.), barrel medic (Medicago truncatula Gaerth.), alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), black lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.), and red clover (Trifolium pratense L.)] were interseeded into sweet corn (Zea mays L.) at last cultivation when sweet corn was at about the V9 (early) or blister (late) stage. The effect of legume interseeding on sweet corn yield, and late-season dry-matter and N yields of aboveground portions of the legumes was determined. Sweet corn yield was not affected by legume interseeding. In 1993, legume dry-matter yields were 1420 kg·ha–1 interseeded early and 852 kg·ha–1 interseeded late. Nitrogen yields were 49 kg·ha–1 interseeded early and 33 kg·ha–1 interseeded late. In 1994, dry-matter yields were 2760 kg·ha–1 interseeded early and 1600 kg·ha–1 interseeded late. Nitrogen yields were 83 kg·ha–1 interseeded early and 50 kg·ha–1 interseeded late. In 1993, barrel medic was the highest-yielding legume with dry matter at 2420 kg·ha–1 and N at 72 kg·ha–1 interseeded early, while red clover yielded the lowest with dry matter at 340 kg·ha–1 and N at 12 kg·ha–1 interseeded late. In 1994, dry-matter and N yields ranged from 4500 and 131 kg·ha–1, respectively, for early interseeded barrel medic to 594 kg·ha–1 and 16 kg·ha–1, respectively, for late interseeded red clover.

Free access

Steven J. Guldan, Charles A. Martin, Jose Cueto-Wong, and Robert L. Steiner

Three legumes [hairy vetch (Vicia villosa Roth.), barrel medic (Medicago truncatula Gaerth.), and black lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.)] were interseeded into `New Mexico 6-4' chile pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) when plants were 20–30 cm tall (3 Aug., “early” interseeding) or when plants were 30–40 cm tall (16–17 Aug., “late” interseeding) in 1993 and 1994. Our objectives were to determine the effect of legume interseeding on cumulative chile yield, and late-season dry-matter and nitrogen yields of aboveground portions of the legumes. Legumes were harvested on 8 Nov. 1993 and 15 Nov. 1994. Chile yield was not significantly affected by legume interseeding. In 1993, legumes accumulated 57% more dry matter and 55% more N when interseeded 3 Aug. vs. 16 Aug. In 1994, legumes accumulated 91% more dry matter and 86% more N when interseeded 3 Aug. vs. 17 Aug. Aboveground dry-matter yields in 1993 ranged from 1350 kg·ha–1 for black lentil interseeded late to 3370 kg·ha–1 for hairy vetch interseeded early. Nitrogen yields ranged from 52 kg·ha–1 for black lentil interseeded late to 136 kg·ha–1 for hairy vetch interseeded early. In 1994, hairy vetch was the highest yielding legume with dry matter at 1810 kg·ha–1 and N at 56 kg·ha–1 interseeded early, while black lentil yielded the lowest with dry matter at 504 kg·ha–1 and N at 17 kg·ha–1 interseeded late. In the spring following each interseeding year, we observed that hairy vetch had overwintered well, whereas barrel medic and black lentil had not, except when a few plants of barrel medic survived the winter of 1994–95. Results from this study indicate that legumes can be successfully interseeded into chile in the high-desert region of the southwestern United States without a significant decrease in chile yield.

Full access

Steven J. Guldan, Charles A. Martin, William C. Lindemann, Jose Cueto-Wong, and Robert L. Steiner

Hairy vetch (Vicia villosa Roth.), barrel medic (Medicago truncatula Gaerth.), and black lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) were interseeded into `New Mexico 6-4' chile pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) when plants were 8 to 12 inches tall or 12 to 16 inches tall in 1993 and 1994. Hairy vetch overwintered well both years, whereas barrel medic and black lentil did not. Spring aboveground dry mass yields of hairy vetch averaged 2.11 and 2.57 tons per acre in 1994 and 1995, respectively, while N accumulation averaged 138 and 145 pounds per acre in 1994 and 1995, respectively. Forage sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] dry mass yield and N accumulation were significantly higher following hairy vetch than following the other legumes or no-legume control. There was no significant difference between forage sorghum yields following barrel medic, black lentil, or the no-legume control. Fertilizer replacement values (FRV) for the legumes were calculated from regression equations for forage sorghum dry mass yield as a function of N fertilizer rate. FRV for hairy vetch were at least 7-times higher than for either barrel medic or black lentil. Hairy vetch interseeded into chile pepper and managed as a winter annual can significantly increase the yield of a following crop compared to a nonfertilized control.

Free access

Charles J. Simon and Richard M. Hannan

Core subsets have been selected for the USDA chickpea (Cicer arietinum), lentil (Lens culinaris), and pea (Pisum sativum) germplasm collections. These subsets are specifically intended to increase the efficiency of the utilization of the entire collections of these taxa. The cores consist of 13% of the 3873 chickpeas, 12% of the 2390 lentils, and 17.5% of the 2886 pea accessions. They were selected by a proportional logarithmic model, and also contain additional accessions based upon documented concentrations of diversity. Each core has been screened for disease reactions, and results suggest that the cores can effectively direct germplasm users toward portions of the entire collections that contain resistant germplasm. These cores have also been useful for those interested in assessing the adaptation potential of these crops in new environments, because the entire range of adaptation is represented. Although cores may not always enhance access to germplasm with unique or extremely rare characteristics, the legume cores have been very useful for directing users toward desirable germplasm from defined geographic areas, and assisting users at the preliminary stages of germplasm evaluation.

Free access

Joseph N. Wolukau, Xiaohui Zhou, and JinFeng Chen

. Warkentin, T. Taran, B. Vandenberg, A. 2002 Genetics of resistance to anthracnose and identification of AFLP and RAPD markers linked to the resistance gene in PI 320937 germplasm of lentil ( Lens culinaris Medikus) Theor. Appl. Genet. 106 428 434 Vos, P

Full access

Brian A. Kahn

was unaffected by intersowing with hairy vetch ( Vicia villosa ), barrel medic ( Medicago truncatula ), or black lentil ( Lens culinaris ) ( Guldan et al., 1996 ). Hairy vetch intercropped with pepper and managed as a winter annual increased the yield

Free access

Ze Li, Xiaofeng Tan, Zhiming Liu, Qing Lin, Lin Zhang, Jun Yuan, Yanling Zeng, and Lingli Wu

regenerate shoots, mainly in species of legume plants including dry bean ( Phaseolus vulgaris L.) ( McClean and Grafton, 1989 ), lentil ( Lens culinaris ) ( Bermejo et al., 2012 ; Chhabra et al., 2008 ; Warkentin and McHughen, 1993 ), mung bean ( Vigna

Free access

Huangjun Lu and Richard Raid

ascochyta blight and anthracnose in lentil ( Lens culinaris Medik) Euphytica 134 223 230 Toussaint, V. 1999 Bacterial leaf spot, a new disease of lettuce in Quebec caused by Xanthomonas campestris pv. vitians Phytoprotection 80 121 125

Full access

Harsimran K. Gill, Robert McSorley, and Danielle D. Treadwell

), redroot pigweed ( Amaranthus retroflexus ), and barnyardgrass ( Echinochloa crusgalli ), but not horseweed ( Conyza canadensis ) ( Benlloglu et al., 2005 ). In Syria, yield of faba bean ( Vicia faba ), lentil ( Lens culinaris ), and pea ( Pisum sativum