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Christos Lykas, Constantinos Kittas, Nikolaos Katsoulas, and Maria Papafotiou

A wide range of potted plants is treated with chemical regulators to obtain compact high-quality plants ( Larson, 1992 ; Pobudkiewicz and Treder, 2006 ). In gardenia potted plant cultivation, the use of chemical growth retardants is a standard

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Lucas O’Meara, Marc W. van Iersel, and Matthew R. Chappell

DWU of nine ornamental species, including Gardenia jasminoides , and developed models to describe DWU. However, they evaluated their models using data from the same crop that was used for model development rather than with an independent data set

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Lucas O’Meara, Matthew R. Chappell, and Marc W. van Iersel

conducted this study to quantify the hydraulic properties of a bark-based substrate and to determine the relationship between substrate VWC and plant water uptake and conductance in Hydrangea macrophylla and Gardenia jasminoides . Our objectives were to

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Amanda Bayer, John Ruter, and Marc W. van Iersel

% for problem crops such as dwarf gardenias ( Gardenia jasminoides ‘Radicans’ and ‘MADGA 1’), which are high-value yet problematic crops for many growers ( Chappell et al., 2013b ). Phytophthora cinnamomi was among the most prevalent pathogens in

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Amanda Bayer, John Ruter, and Marc W. van Iersel

. Cumulative irrigation volume, excluding rainfall, ( A ) and cumulative leachate volume ( B ) to produce Gardenia jasminoides ‘MAGDA I’. Irrigation was initiated for all treatments when the volumetric water content of the control (66 mL irrigation volume

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Karim H. Al-Juboory

Shoot proliferation of Gardenia jasminoides was achieved from cultured shoot tips on Nitsch and Nitsch medium supplemented with different levels (0.0–0.6 mg·L–1) of zeatin, BAP, BA, TDZ, and kinetin. Zeatin proved to be the most effective cytokinin for stimulating shoot proliferation. Shoot length obtained with zeatin was shorter than with other cytokinins and shoot leaves were narrower. Shoot tips were cultured on Nitsch and Nitsch medium supplemented with BA at 4.0 mg·L–1 combined with IAA at 0.0–0.2 mg·L–1. The results indicated that BA at 4.0 mg·L–1 with 0.1 IAA produced greater shoot proliferation. Plantlets regenerated in vitro were then transferred to a mixture of 1 peat: 1 perlite: 1 soil and acclimatized for potting. Our results show that micropropagation of Gardenia has high potential for use in commercial industry.

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Karim H. Al-Juboory, L.K. Al-Amiry, and M.M Kushad

Stem cuttings of greenhouse-grown gardenia (Gardenia jasminoides Ellis) were surface-sterilized and planted on modified Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium supplemented with 2.0 mg/L (BA) and 0.5 mg/L (NAA). This study examines the effects of pH and various sugars on the growth and proliferation of in vitro-cultured gardenia. The highest average shoot number and shoot length were obtained at pH 4.0 to 5.0. In determining the effect of sugars on shoot proliferation, our findings indicated that sucrose and glucose at 30 and 40 g/L, respectively, produced a higher shoot number when compared to fructose and xylose. In addition, sucrose and glucose produced the highest root number, root length, and rooting percentage, while fructose and xylose had no effect on rooting. Sucrose and fructose produced more calli in comparison to other sugars. Xylose at 40 g/L produced the highest dry weight (18.5%), while xylose at 10 g/L produced the highest fresh weight (94.4%).

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A.P. Kamoutsis, A.G. Chronopoulou-Sereli, and E.A. Paspatis

The effects of several shading materials on the response of Gardenia jasminoides Ellis to paclobutrazol were investigated under greenhouse conditions. The three main plot treatments were shading (0%, 67%, 98%), and paclobutrazol (0.0, 0.5, 1.0, and 2 mg/pot) was applied as a soil drench in each main plot after pinching the plants. Both plant size and the number of flower buds per plant decreased as the rate of paclobutrazol increased at all levels of shading. The efficacy of paclobutrazol, however, was generally less under heavy shade, as both translocation of the growth retardant and photosynthesis were reduced. Moderate shading (67%) did not affect the size of plants receiving 0.0 or 0.5 mg of paclobutrazol per pot, but plants grown under heavy shade (98%) were 74% as large as similarly treated nonshaded plants. Medium shade reduced the size of plants receiving 1 and 2 mg paclobutrazol 4% and 6%, respectively, relative to that of similarly treated nonshaded plants, whereas heavy shade reduced plant size 11%. The number of flower buds per plant was reduced 30% by moderate shading, 90% by heavy shading. Significant quadratic relationships were observed between the rate of paclobutrazol applied and (1) plant size, and (2) the number of flower buds per plant. Chemical name used: ±-(R * ,R *)-β–[(4-chlorophenyl)methyl]-α-(1,1-dimethyl)-1H-(1,2,4-triazol)-1-ethanol (paclobutrazol).

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Trent Y. Hata, Arnold H. Hara, Mike A. Nagao, and Benjamin K.S. Hu

Frangipani (Plumeria hybrid `Donald Angus') cuttings immersed in hot water (49C for 10 min) followed by 0.8% indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) basal treatment (hot water + IBA) had greater root length and weight compared to the nontreated control, hot water, or IBA treatment alone. Greater percentage of rooting and number of roots per cutting were observed for hot-water-treated + IBA-treated cuttings compared to the non-treated control and hot-water treatment alone. In a second study, Dracaena fragrans (L.) Ker-Gawl. `Massangeana', D. deremensis Engl. `Warneckii', D. deremensis Engl. `Janet Craig', D. marginata Lam., and cape jasmine (Gardenia jasminoides Ellis) cuttings displayed results similar to those observed with Plumeria cuttings. In addition to enhancing rooting, hot water + IBA also stimulated the number of shoots per cutting on anthurium (Anthurium andraeanum Andre `Marian Seefurth'), croton [Codiaeum variegatum (L.) Blume var. pictum (Lodd.) Mull. Arg.], D. marginata, D. fragrans, Plumeria, and ti (Cordyline terminalis `Ti') cuttings.

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Daniel C. Milbocker