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Dario J. Chavez and Paul M. Lyrene

blueberry from a cross of diploid and hexaploid species J. Hered. 40 304 306 Hokanson, K. Hancock, J. 2000 Early-acting inbreeding depression in three species of Vaccinium (Ericaceae) Sex. Plant Reprod. 13 145 150 Krebs, S.L. Hancock, J.F. 1990 Early

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Lisa J. Rowland, Anik L. Dhanaraj, James J. Polashock, and Rajeev Arora

Expressed sequence tag-polymerase chain reaction (EST-PCR) markers for DNA fingerprinting and mapping in blueberry (Vaccinium sp.) had previously been developed from expressed sequence tags (ESTs) produced from a cDNA library, derived from RNA from floral buds of cold acclimated plants. Because EST-PCR markers are derived from gene coding regions, they are more likely to be conserved across populations and species than markers derived from random regions of DNA, such as randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) or amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers. In this study, we tested whether many of the EST-PCR primer pairs developed for blueberry are capable of amplifying DNA fragments in other members of the family Ericaceae. In addition, we cloned and sequenced a selection of 13 EST-PCR fragments to determine if they showed homology to the original blueberry cDNA clones from which the EST-PCR primer pairs were derived. Closely related cranberry genotypes (two wild selections of V. oxycoccus L. and two cultivars of V. macrocarpon Aiton, `Early Black' and `Stevens') and more distantly related rhododendron genotypes (one wild selection each of Rhododendron arboreum Marsh, R. maximum L., and R. ponticum L. and three complex species hybrids, `Sonata', `Grumpy Yellow', and `Roseum elegans') were used. Of 26 primer pairs tested in cranberry, 23 (89%) resulted in successful amplification and eight of those (35%) amplified polymorphic fragments among the cranberry genotypes. Of 39 primer pairs tested in rhododendron, 29 (74%) resulted in successful amplification and 21 of those (72%) amplified polymorphic fragments among the rhododendron genotypes. Approximately 50% of the 13 sequenced EST-PCR fragments were found to be homologous to the original blueberry cDNA clones. These markers should be useful for DNA fingerprinting, mapping, and assessing genetic diversity within cranberry and rhododendron species. The markers which are shown to be homologous to the blueberry cDNA clones by DNA sequencing should also be useful for comparative mapping and genetic diversity studies between some genera of the family Ericaceae.

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Nian Wang, Zhang Chang Qin, Jun-bo Yang, and Jing-li Zhang

, F.D. Stevens, P. Wallace, G.D. Anderberg, A. 2005 Rhododendron (Ericaceae) 260 455 Wu Z.Y. Raven P.H. Flora of China Vol. 14 Science Press, Beijing, China; Missouri Botanical Garden Press

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Xue-qin Wang, Yuan Huang, and Chun-lin Long

, M.Y. Hu, L.Z. Yang, H.B. Qin, H.N. Min, T.L. David, F. Chamberlain, P.S. Wallace, G.D. Anderberg, A. 2005 Rhododendron (Ericaceae) 333 Wu Z.Y. Raven P

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Carrie A. Radcliffe, James M. Affolter, and Hazel Y. Wetzstein

similar to other members of the Ericaceae ( Hermann and Palser, 2000 ; Hesse, 1983 ; Lu et al., 2009 ; Palser et al., 1992 ; Williams and Rouse, 1990 ; Zomlefer, 1994 ); anthers dehisce longitudinally, and binucleate pollen is borne in tetrads of four

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Michael Marcotrigiano and Susan P. McGlew

A two-stage micropropagation system was devised for cranberries (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.). Shoot-tip explants taken from four cultivars of greenhouse-grown plants were placed on media composed of Anderson's major salts, Murashige and Skoog's (MS) minor salts and organics, plus various concentrations of 2iP, IBA, and GA3. In other experiments, explant source, salt formulations for media, and rooting treatments were studied. Optimal multiplication and shoot quality occurred when nodal explants taken from greenhouse-grown or micropropagated plants were placed on medium containing 150 μm 2iP, 1.0 μm IBA, and no GA3. Histological examination revealed that the initial response of nodes to culture is axillary bud proliferation, but adventitious shoot formation occurred after 4 to 6 weeks. Cultures that contained only axillary shoots were not evident unless low levels of 2iP were used, at which point only axillary buds present on the explants were released. Proliferated shoots could be rooted ex vitro without auxin treatment. Optimal rooting occurred under high-light conditions. Plants were transplanted to the field for comparison to conventionally propagated material. Chemical names used: gibberellic acid (GA3), N-(3-methyl-2-butenyl)-1H-purin-6-amine (2iP), 1H-indole-3-butanoic acid (IBA).

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Kevin R. Kosola and Beth Ann A. Workmaster

Cranberry and other members of the Ericaceae commonly form ericoid mycorrhizal (ERM) associations with fungi [e.g., Rhizoscyphus ericae (D.J. Read) W.Y. Zhuang and Korf [syn. Hymenoscyphus ericae (D.J. Read) Korf and Kernan] ( Allen et al

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Carrie A. Radcliffe, James M. Affolter, and Hazel Y. Wetzstein

Georgia plume ( Elliottia racemosa , Ericaceae) is a tree endemic to the Coastal Plain region of Georgia in the southeastern United States. It was first discovered by the explorer, William Bartram, in 1773 and documented by botanist Stephen Elliott

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Justin A. Porter, Hazel Y. Wetzstein, David Berle, Phillip A. Wadl, and Robert N. Trigiano

Georgia plume ( Elliottia racemosa , Ericaceae) is a beautiful, rare, small tree endemic only to Georgia, where it is listed as a threatened species ( Georgia Department of Natural Resources, 2006 ). It produces spectacular plume-like white

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Justin A. Porter, David Berle, and Hazel Y. Wetzstein

for ex situ conservation, and exploration for unknown populations. Georgia plume [ Elliottia racemosa (Ericaceae)] is a small tree that is endemic only to the state of Georgia, where it is listed as a threatened species ( Georgia Department of Natural