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John L. Cisar and George H. Snyder

The objective of this experiment was to determine the suitability of a compost obtained from a commercially available solid-waste processing plant for sod production when placed over a plastic barrier. Comparisons were made between compost-grown sod with and without fertilizer and between compost-grown sod and commercially grown sod. Six weeks after seeding or sprigging, both fertilized and nonfertilized compost-grown `Argentine' bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum Flugge), `Tifway' bermudagrass (Cynodon transvaalensis × C. dactylon), and `Floratam' St. Augustinegrass [Stenotaphrum secundatum (Walt.) Kuntze.] had discolored leaf blade tissue and poor growth. At 6 weeks, bahiagrass leaf tissue had a low N concentration, which suggested that the compost immobilized fertilizer N. Additionally, initial high salinity of the compost (2.85 dS·m-1) may have contributed to turf discoloration and lack of vigor. However, poor growth and discoloration were temporary. At 3 and 5 months, fertilized compost-grown turfgrasses had higher quality and coverage than nonfertilized sod. At 5 months, fertilized sod had sufficient coverage for harvest, whereas for conventional field production 9 to 24 months generally is required to produce a harvestable product. Compost-grown sod pieces had similar or higher tear resistance than commercially grown sod. One and 3 weeks after transplanting on a sand soil, compost-grown sod produced higher root weight and longer roots in the underlying soil than did commercially grown sod. The solid-waste compost used in this study offers a viable alternative material for producing sod that will benefit solid-waste recycling efforts.

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B.J. Johnson

A field experiment was conducted for 2 years to determine the effects of rate and time interval for repeated applications of the plant growth regulators (PGR) flurprimidol and paclobutrazol on vegetative suppression of `Tifway' bermudagrass [Cynodon transvaalensis Burtt-Davy × C. dactylon (L.) Pers.]. Suppression of vegetative growth of this grass was generally the same when either flurprimidol or paclobutrazol was applied twice after a 2-, 3-, or 4-week interval. The duration of growth suppression was also similar after initial application with flurprimidol at 0.84 kg·ha-l and repeated at 0.28 to 0.84 kg·ha-1 or with paclobutrazol applied initially at 1.1 kg·ha-1 an d repeated at 0.56 to 1.1 kg·ha-1. Both PGRs caused slight to moderate turfgrass injury at these rates, but the injury was temporary and the grass had fully recovered by 10 weeks. Chemical names used: α -(1-methylethyl)- α -[4-(trifluoromethoxy)-phenyl]-5-pyrimidinemethanol (flurprimidol); (±)-(R*R*) β -[(4-chlorophenyl)-methyl]- α -(1,1-dimethylethyl)-1H-1,2,4-triazole-l-ethanol (paclobutrazol).

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Chuanhao Chen, Shaoyun Lu, Youguang Chen, Zhongcheng Wang, Yuejing Niu, and Zhenfei Guo

) induced by gamma irradiation exhibited considerable growth retardation ( Busey, 1980 ). Dwarf-type cultivars of bermudagrass ( Cynodon dactylon ) and triploid bermudagrass ( Cynodon transvaalensis × C. dactylon ) like TifEagle, Tift 94, and Tifway II

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Patrick E. McCullough, Ted Whitwell, Lambert B. McCarty, and Haibo Liu

( Festuca arundinacea ) and hybrid bermudagrass ( Cynodon transvaalensis × C. dactylon ) sod to herbicides Weed Technol. 17 521 525 Finney, S.B. 1991 Cellular responses of bentgrass and bermudagrass to selected preemergence

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Shaoyun Lu, Zhongcheng Wang, Yuejing Niu, Zhenfei Guo, and Bingru Huang

peroxidation Crop Sci. 41 436 442 Lu, S. Wang, Z. Peng, X. Guo, Z. Zhang, G. Han, L. 2006 An efficient callus suspension culture system for triploid bermudagrass ( Cynodon transvaalensis

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Masoud Arghavani, Mohsen Kafi, Mesbah Babalar, Roohangiz Naderi, Md. Anamul Hoque, and Yoshiyoki Murata

triploid bermudagrass ( Cynodon transvaalensis × C. dactylon ) and their physiological responses to salt and drought stress Plant Cell Rpt. 26 1413 1420 Lyons, E.M. Pote, J. DaCosta, M. Huang, B. 2007 Whole-plant carbon relations and root respiration

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June Liu, Zhimin Yang, Weiling Li, Jingjin Yu, and Bingru Huang

, S. Wang, Z. Peng, X. Guo, Z. Zhang, G. Han, L. 2006 An efficient callus suspension culture system for triploid bermudagrass ( Cynodon transvaalensis × C. dactylon ) and somaclonal variations Plant Cell Tissue Organ Cult. 87 77 84 Murashige, T

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Jingjin Yu, Hongmei Du, Ming Xu, and Bingru Huang

found in other turfgrass species [hybrid bermudagrass ( Cynodon transvaalensis × C. dactylon ) and kentucky bluegrass ( Du et al., 2011 )]. Elevated CO 2 may suppress heat-enhanced respiration, because plants exposed to elevated CO 2 had a lower

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Longxing Hu, Zehui Huang, Shuqian Liu, and Jinmin Fu

triploid bermudagrass ( Cynodon transvaalensis × C. dactylon ) and their physiological responses to salt and drought stress Plant Cell Rpt. 26 1413 1420 Mancino, C. Pepper, I.L. 1994 Effects of wastewater on the turfgrass/soil environment, p. 121–135. In