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Rapid in vitro propagation of Anigozanthos manglesii D. Don. was achieved through the initiation and proliferation of shoots from lateral bud explants using a modified Murashige and Skoog medium, or Gamborg, Miller and Ojima B5 medium, supplemented with 0.5 ppm benzylaminopurine (BA) and 0.5 ppm naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA). Continued proliferation was obtained by sub-culture either on the same media or media containing 0.25 ppm BA plus 0.25 ppm NAA. Rapid rooting of shoots occured following transfer to a half strength B5 medium containing 0.2 ppm NAA. Plantlets were successfully transplanted onto a University of California (UC) potting mix under mist and reduced light intensity. The method has also been successfully employed with Anigozanthos flavidus Redoute and with Macropidia fulginosa (Hook.) Druce.

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Flowering responses of two Anigozanthos hybrids were investigated. Flowering of 20-week old `Regal Claw' and A. manglesii x A. flavidus either from the main fan or the lateral fans was accelerated when plants received a night temp of 13 C, regardless of the photoperiod treatments. Temperature was the major factor controlling flowering of Anigo- zanthos hybrids. Flowering was accelerated from the lateral fans by treating plants at 15.5 or 18 C and a long day (LD) photoperiod. There were fewer than 2.5 branches in the stem at 18 C compared to more than 4.0 branches at 13 C. A night temp of 13 C was optimum for early flowering and for increased quality of cut flowers. At an inductive night temp of 13 C, Anigozanthos hybrids are day neutral while at 15.5 or 18 C they are quantitative LD plants.

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Abstract

Seedlings of Anigozanthos manglesii D. Don responded positively to watering and fertilization when the night temperature was 12° to I5°C; at higher temperatures, these factors caused seedling death. Cold treatment (10°C for 17 hours a day for a month) of seedlings prior to planting stimulated growth, new fan production, and flower yield. Temperatures below 10° promoted flower differentiation, whereas cultivation at higher temperatures reduced flower yield. Illuminating plants at night from 2200 to 0200 HR did not affect flower yield when plants were grown at relatively low temperatures, but it did reduce yields when they were grown in a heated greenhouse.

Open Access

Phosphine (PH3) is a potential alternative fumigant to methyl bromide for insect disinfestation of cut flowers. King protea (Protea cynaroides L.), tulip (Tulipa gesneriana `Apeldoorn'), kangaroo paw (Anigozanthos manglesii Hook.), and geraldton wax (Chamelaucium uncinatum `Purple Pride') were fumigated with PH3 at varying concentrations (100 to 8000 μL·L-1) for 2, 4, or 6 hours. Vase life was evaluated at 20 °C, 65% relative humidity, and constant illumination with a photosynthetically active radiation of 15 μmol·m-2·S-1. No significant change in vase life was observed for kangaroo paws after any of the PH3 fumigations. A 6-hour fumigation at 8000 μL·L-1 significantly reduced vase life in king protea, tulip, and geraldton wax flower. Geraldton wax flower and tulip were relatively sensitive to PH3, as they were damaged by 4000 μL·L-1 for 6 hours and 8000 μL·L-1 for 4 hours, respectively. Phosphine has potential as an insect disinfestation fumigant for king protea, tulip, and kangaroo paw at 4000 (μL·L-1 for 6 hours without affecting vase life or causing damage.

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Kangaroo paw is a new cut flower crop native to Australia. There are several interspecific hybrids with improved flower colors, heat tolerance, and growth habit. These hybrids are sterile due to divergent evolution of the parent species. Colchicine was used to double the chromosome number of one important sterile hybrid. This hybrid is everblooming. dwarf. and heat tolerant. The resulting allodiploid was fertile, and progeny are now being evaluated.

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Five members of the Proteaceae and 13 Australian native cut flower cultivars were stored for 35 days under standard conditions at 1C to assess their ability to withstand long-term storage and transport. Protea cynaroides L., Leucadendron `Silvan Red', Leucospermum `Firewheel', Thryptomene calycina (Lindl.) Stapf., Telopea speciosissima R. Br., and Verticordia grandtiflora Endl. retained a vase life of at least 7 days after 21 days of storage. Leucospermum cordifolium Salisb. ex Knight, Protea neriifoli R. Br., Chamelaucium uncinatum `Alba', C. uncinatum `Purple Pride', Verticordia monadelpha Turcz., Verticordia plumosa (Desf.) Druce, and Verticordia nitens (Lindl.) Schau. suffered a decline in vase life ranging from 31% to 100% after 14 to 21 days of storage. Species of Verticordia and Chamelaucium were particularly susceptible to fungal infection. Anigozanthos pulcherrimus Hook. and the Anigozanthos cultivars Ruby Delight, Bush Harmony, Bush Haze, and Gold Fever all showed a significant reduction in vase life after 14 days of storage compared with unstored controls.

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paw cultivar Anigozanthos ‘Bush Ranger’ ( Anigozanthos humilis × A. flavidus ) ( Griesbach, 1990 ). In addition to these examples of interspecific hybridization within a genus, doubling was used to restore fertility in × Chitalpa tashkentensis , an

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sativa ) hay as well as from fresh and dried bushland shoot materials ( Flematti et al., 2011a ). Research that led to the isolation and characterization of glyceronitrile was spurred by the inactivity of KAR 1 on seeds of Anigozanthos manglesii , a

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Combined Proc. Intl. Plant Propagators Soc. 56 137 142 Turner, S. Krauss, S.L. Bunn, E. Senaratna, T. Dixon, K. Tan, B. Touchell, D. 2001 Genetic fidelity and viability of Anigozanthos viridis following tissue culture, cold storage, and cryopreservation

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). Mg 2+ can increase the content of anthocyanin, thereby enriching flower colors (15% to 70%), such as in the red flower of Anigozanthos flavidus , the blue bracts of Limonium sinuatum , the pink flowers of Gypsophila elegans , and the blue flowers

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