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Yellow-horn ( Xanthoceras sorbifolium Bunge) is a rare woody oil plant mainly distributed in China, with nutritious seeds that contain a high oil content in the seed kernels ( Xie and Zhang, 2018 ). It is suitable for both biodiesel production

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Yellow-horn ( Xanthoceras sorbifolium Bunge), a plant endemic to northern China, is resistant to drought, cold, saline stress, and barren soil, but cannot withstand excess moisture ( Ao et al., 2012 ). Yellow-horn has been cultivated for more

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Yellow-horn ( Xanthoceras sorbifolium Bunge), a member of the family Sapindaceae, is a traditional woody oil tree species that occurs naturally in northern China. It is a deciduous tree or shrub with ecological, economic, and ornamental value

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Yellow-horn ( Xanthoceras sorbifolium Bunge), a valuable plant native to China, is a member of the family Sapindaceae. It is mainly distributed in North China, with a cultivation history of more than 1000 years ( Ma et al., 2020 ). The species can

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hybridization of I. sanguinea × I. sanguinea f. albiflora which was crossed in 2007. Flowers of ‘Forest Fairy’ were large and its outer and inner perianths have conspicuous brown reticulate veins on yellow claw at the base, and spoon-type parts of outer

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cultivars were Haralson, Patten’s Greening, Yellow Transparent, Northwestern Greening, McMahon, Whitney Crab, Dolgo, McIntosh Red, Wolf River, Dutchess of Oldenburg, Charlamoff, Martha, Virginia Crab, and Anoka ( Table 2 ). In Wyoming, Wealthy, Haralson, and

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, commonly referred to as crotons, are small evergreen trees and shrubs with varied leaf shapes and vivid foliage colors displayed as shades, blends, combinations, or solid patches of red, pink, orange, yellow, lavender, black, and green. Leaf sizes range

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% red blush with weak to strong stripes in overcolor on yellow-green ground color, moderate to high soluble solids content (13.9 °Brix) and high acidity (7.9 g·L –1 malic acid) at harvest; very firm, crisp and juicy with strong aroma; low sensitivity to

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( Isobe and Hashimoto, 1994 ). With its showy golden yellow flowers, which can last up to 7 months ( Liu et al., 2003 ), and abroad ecological environment adaptability, this species has attracted some horticulturists from the United States, the United

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wildflowers ( Urbatsch et al., 2000 ). Rudbeckia subtomentosa is a durable, diploid (2 n = 2x = 38) perennial, hardy to USDA zone 4. It is well adapted to many environments and has showy yellow ray florets. The tall stature of R. subtomentosa (2 to 3 m

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