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shortages that are not related to drought by 2024 ( U.S. Government Accountability Office, 2014 ). In response to these concerns, a variety of water conservation initiatives have been performed in the United States, such as installing WaterSense-labeled and

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nation’s domestic water use is directed toward the landscape in the form of irrigation ( DeOreo et al., 2016 ). In places such as central Florida, this amount can exceed 60% ( Haley et al., 2007 ) and in Florida, the adoption of water conservation

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and exceptionally extreme drought conditions in 2012 that forced city governments to prioritize water conservation ( Arndt, 2002 ; South Central Climate Science Center, 2013 ). By Spring 2015, conditions improved but still remained abnormally dry, and

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. Thus, the urban landscape is one area that is a target for water conservation. This might be due to two reasons: 1) the urban landscape is highly visible to the public and is apt to be regulated, and 2) increasing urbanization is favoring a shift in

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A survey instrument was designed to determine public opinion on water conservation, water conserving landscapes, the use of native plants in landscapes, home irrigation systems, and the performance of five Texas native plant species [pink evening primrose (Oenothera speciosa); prairie verbena (Verbena bipinnatifida); red yucca (Hesperaloe parviflora); ceniza (Leucophyllum frutescens); and ruellia (Ruellia nudiflora)] grown in low water use landscapes in the semiarid Southwestern United States. On six occasions during the 1999 growing season, participants viewed landscapes and participated in a survey. Survey data indicate that over 90% of respondents thought water conservation was important to the state of Texas. A majority of participants however, believed water conserving landscapes to be expensive to maintain and not aesthetically pleasing. The survey revealed 79% of participants would use native plants if native plants conserved water, and 86% of participants would use native plants if native plants were attractive. Chi-square approximations revealed participant's opinions regarding water conservation and home irrigation systems were influenced by education level and amount of time they participated in weekly horticulture activities. In an open-ended question, participants indicated flowers and healthy leaves were characteristics indicating a plant was performing well. Throughout the year, species in flower received higher ratings than nonflowering species.

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water quality issues are getting worse over time and are significantly affecting the future of green industries (greenhouse, nursery, landscape). Water conservation can be achieved by irrigating greenhouse and nursery crops, and landscape plantings with

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et al., 2016 ). Background In an effort to increase landscape water conservation, water districts throughout the southwest United States have invested millions of dollars in rebates and incentives for their customers who, in turn, agree to

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-planted coco coir plug strawberry transplants and the heat stress management practice of white-on-black mulch (WP system) would be an effective strategy for water conservation and higher early yield, which due to a higher price and decreased irrigation cost

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We surveyed homeowners with residential landscapes in Las Cruces, N.M., to determine design features participants valued in their landscapes, their attitudes toward the landscape use of desert plants and opinions on factors that would encourage respondents to reduce landscape water use. We also determined whether the willingness to use desert plants in their landscapes related to the length of residency in the southwestern United States. At least 98% of respondents landscaped to enhance the appearance of their home and increase their property value. About half (50.6%) of the participants strongly agreed or agreed that the main reason to landscape was to display their landscape preferences. Many participants indicated they would use desert plants to landscape their front yard (80.3%) and back yard (56.3%), but relatively lower percentages of participants actually had desert landscapes in their front yard and back yard. Regardless of their property value, respondents were more likely to use desert plants in their backyard the shorter their stay in the desert. Data revealed that participants rank water shortages as the factor that would most likely cause them to reduce the amount of water they applied to their landscapes. We conclude that homeowners report willingness to use desert plants but desert-type landscapes are not a widespread feature of managed residential landscapes. Furthermore, water shortages and the length of time respondents spent in a desert environment would most likely influence water use in their landscapes.

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implemented by regional and local agencies, Cooperative Extension Services, and other organizations to encourage more efficient irrigation water use and residential water conservation; however, limited information exists about the effectiveness of such

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