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interest in applying CEA practices to urban agriculture (UA), including small- (e.g., in-home production or indoor gardens), medium- (e.g., community gardens), or large-scale commercial operations [e.g., rooftop greenhouses or warehouse-based indoor “plant

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Urban areas started as complex social structures ≈10,000 years ago. Many of the earliest urban areas developed in arid climates near reliable fresh river water resources ( Redman, 1999 ). In the modern era, urban and suburban population growth has

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Many urban centers in the western United States are in ecoregions that experience generally low or markedly seasonal patterns of precipitation that create prolonged periods of soil water deficits during the year ( Omernik, 2014 ). As a result, most

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Urban green spaces provide critical access to nature for residents and, within these spaces, natural turfgrass comprises a significant portion of urban vegetation globally ( Ignatieva et al. 2020 ). Natural turfgrass provides a variety of

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In urban forests throughout North America, scale insects are some of the most abundant pests damaging landscape trees ( Frank 2019 ). Crapemyrtle bark scale (CMBS), Acanthococcus lagerstroemiae (Kuwana) (Hemiptera: Eriococcidae), is a nonnative

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%. New Jersey is the most densely populated state in the United States, with 92.2% of its residents living in urban neighborhoods; however, it has an estimated 750,000 acres of farmland (US Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Statistics

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ideal candidates for planting in typically low soil moisture conditions found in the urban environment ( Abrams, 1990 ; Osuna et al., 2015 ; Sjöman et al., 2018 ). Oaks are commonly a major component of urban forests across eastern North American

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inhabitants in urban areas increases as well ( Lin et al. 2015 ; Opitz et al. 2016 ). This situation has led to many communities experiencing food insecurity, primarily in urban areas throughout the globe ( Ackerman et al. 2014 ; Lin et al. 2015 ). It has

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Abstract

Increasing urban problems in regards to people and plants suggest consideration of a new emphasis in urban horticulture. This article is based on a talk presented by F. O. Lanphear at a symposium entitled “Urban Ecology Today” at the AAAS meetings in Chicago, Illinois in December, 1970.

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Decisions regarding the selection and care of trees on public lands often are delegated to public employees with limited knowledge of tree care. To provide a technical resource for the municipal employee, the Urban Forestry Notebook was developed through sponsorship by Puget Power (a major Pacific Northwest utility company), Washington State Department of Natural Resources, and the Center. The unique focus of this Notebook provided the municipal employee with information on the selection and care of 65 of the most important urban trees. It also can be used as a model by other communities who wish to improve the care of their urban trees by providing an informational resource for the public employee.

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