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80 COLLOQUIUM 2 (Abstr. 636–642) Organic Horticulture

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changes significantly as a function of these exogenous factors and farming system choices, in some cases exacerbating impacts on nutrient density and in other cases ameliorating them. For example, Yanez et al. (2008) showed that organic production can

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Poster Session 44—Organic Production 21 July 2005, 12:00–12:45 p.m. Poster Hall–Ballroom E/F

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Oral Session 1—Organic Horticulture Moderator: Matthew D. Kleinhenz 18 July 2005, 2:00–4:00 p.m. Ballroom H

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A kiwifruit vineyard converted to an organic farm was compared to a conventionally farmed vineyard from 1990 through 1992. February or March applications of composted chicken manure (organic plot) or NH4N O3 plus CaNH4 (NO3)3 through microsprinklers during the growing season (conventional plot) were applied to give equal rates of N. Soil analyses indicated no differences in nutrient or salt levels. Nitrogen leaf levels from the organic plot were consistently lower than those from the conventional system but were not deficient. Leaf concentrations of sodium and chloride increased over the three-year period in the organic plot, but not to phytotoxic levels. Organically grown fruit was as firm or firmer than conventionally grown fruit at harvest and four months after harvest. Damage from latania scale or omnivorous leaf roller was minimal in both plots until 1992, when the organic plot had 3.9% scale compared to 0% in the conventional plot. An economic analysis comparing the short-term profitability of the two systems will be presented.

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[certified by the Northeast Organic Farming Association (NOFA) or the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) or not certified], and price per pound ($0.99, $1.29, $1.59, or $1.89). The price levels were selected according to the average retail prices in

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conducted using conventional farming practices though cultivars developed in these systems are not always the best performing ones in organic farming systems ( Burger et al., 2008 ; Reid et al., 2011 ; Renaud et al., 2014a ). In a large tomato germplasm

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Increasing crop production and mitigating abiotic stresses are major challenges under extreme climatic environments and intense farming activities. Increased yield can be achieved through either agricultural expansion or intensification and

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production and cycling of on-farm inputs ( Parr et al., 1990 ). Similarly, organic farming systems often use fertility sources of biological origin (e.g., cover crops, crop residues, composts, and manures) and are based on minimal use of off-farm inputs

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Organic farming is rapidly increasing in U.S. agriculture. Weeds are listed as the number one problem for organic producers ( Walz, 1999 ). Only a few organic herbicides are used in organic farming systems ( Webber III et al., 2012 ). MSMs as by

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