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first fruit, can have consequences for mechanical damage to fruit occurring during harvesting operations. There has been little published concerning the cultural factors affecting yield of nonpungent jalapeños, a relatively new type of pepper. Russo

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. Based on our results with microplots, new ‘Pinot noir’ vineyards that are planted on de-vigorating rootstocks and managed with drip irrigation should be tolerant of short periods of fairly severe drought stress with little impact on fruit quality. The

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concentration of 2.4 mg·g −1 ( Rimando and Perkins-Veazie, 2005 ). Those authors reported less L-citrulline in red-fleshed fruit than in yellow or orange, but only a small sample size (three fruit for each variety) was used, and because the fruit tested were

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Field and greenhouse studies examined the fruit detachment force (FDF) and fruit and pedicel characteristics of two lines of tabasco pepper (Capsicum frutescens L.) at several stages of maturity. The detachment force of red-mature `McIlhenny Select' fruit at the calyx-fruit detachment area was lower than that of less mature fruit stages. The force required to detach red-mature Hard Pick (HP) tabasco fruit was higher than that of redmature `McIlhenny Select' fruit in the field and greenhouse. The fruit detachment force of red field-grown HP fruit was higher, and in the greenhouse was lower, than that of green or breaker fruit. HP fruit of all maturity stages, except red-mature, separated similarly to `McIlhenny Select' fruit with little or no fruit tissue attached to the calyx. Fruit detachment force was not correlated with any fruit or pedicel characteristics studied.

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Pomegranate ( Punica granatum , Lythraceae) is a bushy shrub or small tree native to Iran to the Himalayas in northern India. It has been cultivated since ancient times throughout the Mediterranean regions of Asia, Africa, and Europe. The fruit is

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marketable yield (kg/plant), total and marketable fruit size (kg/sample), marketability by weight (%), and aboveground biomass (g). Lettuce trials. Red ‘New Red Fire’ and green ‘Two Star’ lettuce (Johnny’s Selected Seeds) were grown in trials that

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Peaches stored in air for 40 days at OC developed severe internal breakdown and poor quality after transferring them to 20C to ripen. Comparable fruit stored under controlled atmosphere (1% O2 + 5% CO2) and then ripened at 20C had no breakdown and retained good quality. Fruit stored under CA had less reducing sugars but more sucrose than air stored fruit. Fruit pH increased and titratable acidity decreased over a 40 day storage period. Citric acid increased slightly while malic acid decreased during storage. Little or no differences in overall acidity and individual organic acids existed between CA and air storage. Little or no change in individual phenolic acid content occurred during storage or between CA and air storage. Internal color darkened and became redder with storage. CA stored fruit was significantly firmer than air stored fruit. Sensory evaluation indicated CA stored fruit was more acidic, sweeter, and had better overall flavor than air stored fruit.

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The effects of grapefruit cultivar and coating type on chilling injury (CI) incidence were examined. The shellac coating widely used for exported citrus resulted in the lowest CI incidence in white `Marsh' grapefruit stored for 2 months at 4 °C and 92% ± 3% relative humidity compared with nonwaxed fruit or fruit waxed with either carnauba or polyethylene waxes. The order of coating performance for reducing CI was shellac > carnauba > polyethylene > nonwaxed fruit. For `Flame' little difference of coating type on CI was detected after 2 months of storage. Overall, CI incidence was high in fruit of the cultivars harvested from September to December, low in February, and high again after March but was generally higher in white `Marsh' seedless grapefruit than `Ruby Red', `Rio Red', or `Flame'. However, little difference of cultivar on CI incidence was found among the `Ruby Red', `Rio Red', and `Flame' grapefruit except the October harvest in which CI was higher in `Ruby Red' than in `Rio Red' and `Flame' grapefruit. These studies suggest that the coating and cultivar should be considered in the postharvest management of CI in commercial packing.

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The stony hard gene in peach is a recessive gene which increases fruit firmness and shelf-life. Five progenies segregating for the stony hard trait were scored for several ripening-related characteristics. Fruit from stony hard segregants produced little or no ethylene, had lower respiration rates, and tended to ripen later than `normal' fruit. Stony hard fruit also had a lower percentage red overcolor in three of the five progenies. Stony hard fruit, harvested when firm-ripe, maintained their firmness after five days storage at 20°C. Firmness of stony hard fruit decreased significantly if the fruit were sprayed with ethephon (2-chloroethylphosphonic acid) at 250 ppm prior to storage. Fruit firmness of `normal' freestone or clingstone varieties was not significantly affected by the application of ethephon. The conversion of ethylene precursors to ethylene in stony hard fruit will also be discussed.

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`Gulfking' and `Gulfcrest' peaches are jointly released for grower trials by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, the Georgia Agricultural Experiment Station, and the Florida Agricultural Experiment Station. Trees of `Gulfking' and `Gulfcrest' produce an attractive, sweet-tasting, yellow and non-melting flesh fruit intended for the fresh fruit market. They are expected to produce fruit with tree-ripened aroma and taste while retaining firmness for longer shelf life than fruit from conventional melting-flesh cultivars. Trees of `Gulfking' reach full bloom most seasons in mid-February in lower southern Georgia and are estimated to require 350 chill units. We expect this new peach to be adapted in areas where `Flordaking' has been successfully grown. Fruit ripen 73 to 80 days from full bloom, typically in early May, usually with `Flordaking' in southern Georgia. The fruit are large, ranging from 105 to 130 grams. Commercially ripe fruit exhibit 80% to 90% red (with moderately fine darker red stripes) over a deep yellow to orange ground color. Fruit shape is round with a recessed tip. Pits are medium small and have little tendency to split even when crop loads are low. Trees of `Gulfcrest' are estimated to require 525 chill units. This is based on full bloom consistently occurring with `Sunfre' nectarine at Attapulgus, Ga. where full bloom occurs most seasons in early-March. Fruit ripen 62 to 75 days from full bloom, typically in early to mid-May, usually a few days after `Flordacrest' in southern Georgia. The fruit are medium-large, averaging about 105 g. Commercially ripe fruit exhibit 90% to 95% red over a deep yellow to orange ground color. Fruit shape is round with a recessed tip. Pits are medium small and have little tendency to split even when crop loads are low.

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