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D.J. Wolyn

Abbreviations: LMFI, large-medium fern index; PMY, percent marketable yield; TFI, total fern index; TFN, total fern number. This research was supported by the Natural Science and Engineering Research Council of Canada, the Ontario Ministry of

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Glenn B. Fain, Charles H. Gilliam, and Gary J. Keever

Hardy ferns are widely grown for use in the landscape. Studies were conducted to evaluate the tolerance of variegated leatherleaf fern (Arachniodes simplicor `Variegata'), tassel fern (Polystichum polyblepharum), autumn fern (Dryopteris erythrosora), holly fern (Cyrtomium falcatum `Rochfordii'), and southern shield fern (Dryopteris ludoviciana), to applications of selected preemergence applied herbicides. Liquid applied herbicides were pendamethalin (LPM) at 3.36 or 6.73 kg·ha–1, prodiamine (LPD) at 1.12 or 2.24 kg·ha–1, isoxaben (LIB) at 1.12 or 2.24 kg·ha–1, and the combination of prodiamine plus isoxaben (LPI) at 1.12 plus 1.12 kg·ha–1. Granular applied herbicides were pendamethalin (GPM) at 3.36 or 6.73 kg·ha–1, prodiamine (GPD)1.12 or 2.24 kg·ha–1, oxadiazon plus prodiamine (GOP) at 1.12 + 0.22 or 2.24 + 0.44 kg·ha–1, oxyfuorfen plus oryzalin (GOO) at 2.24 + 1.12 or 4.48 + 2.24 kg·ha–1, trifluralin plus isoxaben (GTI) at 2.24 + 0.56 or 4.48 + 1.12 kg·ha–1, oxadiazon (GO) at 4.48 or 8.97 kg·ha–1, and oxadiazon plus pendamethalin (GOPD) at 2.24 + 1.4 or 4.48 + 2.8 kg·ha–1. The greatest reduction in growth of autumn fern was observed with GOPD, GO, and GOP; all three containing oxadiazon as an active ingredient. Reductions in holly fern growth were most severe when plants were treated with GTI resulting in a 42% and 54% decrease in frond length and frond number, respectively. There were also reductions in number of fronds when treated with LPM, GPM, GOP, GOO, and GOPD. There were no reductions in frond numbers on tassel fern with any herbicides tested. However, there were reductions in frond length from 6 of the 10 herbicides evaluated. The most sensitive fern to herbicides evaluated in 2004 was leatherleaf with reductions in frond length and number of fronds with 6 of the 10 herbicides tested. While all herbicides tested on southern shield fern appeared to be safe, especially in the 2004 study, tassel fern and holly fern appear to be more sensitive. GPD proved to be a safe herbicide for all species tested in both 2004 and 2005. In 2005 all plants from all treatments were considered marketable by the end of the study. However there was significant visual injury observed on the holly fern treated with LIB at 60 and 90 days after treatment which might reduce their early marketability.

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Erik J. Landry and David J. Wolyn

Asparagus is an herbaceous perennial in which the above-ground fern senesces, turning yellow in the fall, leaving the crown to overwinter. In southern Ontario, the primary production region within Canada, winter temperatures below –20 °C, early

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Satoru Motoki, Takumi Taguchi, Ayaka Kato, Katsuhiro Inoue, and Eiji Nishihara

process leaves ferns from the aboveground parts and roots from the underground parts as large amounts of unusable parts, and this is an issue to be resolved. In our previous study, large amounts of rutin were noted in the cladophylls and storage roots

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Satoru Motoki, Tianli Tang, Takumi Taguchi, Ayaka Kato, Hiromi Ikeura, and Tomoo Maeda

components. In particular, cladophylls and the fern can be sources of rutin, and young fruit and seeds are sources of protodioscin. Large amounts of protodioscin are noted in the buds, and the soil-covered section of the spear and the rhizome; the rutin

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Pedro García-Caparrós, Alfonso Llanderal, and María Teresa Lao

uptake efficiencies and their losses in the production of container plants. We investigated fern leaf lavender because it is a native Mediterranean species that is frequently used in landscapes due to its ability to adapt to stressful environmental

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C. H. Gilliam, C. E. Evans, R. L. Shumack, and C. O. Plank

Abstract

Boston fern [Nephrolepis exaltata (L.) Schott ‘Rooseveltii’] was grown with sufficient and insufficient levels of N and K and leaf nutrient concentrations were determined periodically from 4 frond sections: frond tips, 10–12 cm; frond midsections, 10–12 cm; frond bases, 10–12 cm; and whole fronds, 30–40 cm. Both the frond midsection and the whole frond were found to be acceptable for foliar analysis. Frond tips had the lowest nutrient concentrations for most elements. Foliar N was similar for all frond sections sampled. Nitrogen deficiency symptoms occurred after 2 to 4 weeks of minus N conditions. When three N sources were added to plants grown under minus N conditions, N source had a limited influence on N uptake as measured by foliar analysis. One and 2 weeks after N treatment was restored to N-deficient ferns, foliar N had increased 55 and 100%, respectively.

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Suzanne M. Dethier Rogers and Sharon Banister

`Sun-Tuff ferns were donated by Lone Star Growers, San Antonio, Texas. We thank E.J. Soltes for the use of greenhouse facilities. The cost of publishing this paper was defrayed in part by the payment of page charges. Under postal regulations, this paper

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Glenn B. Fain, Charles H. Gilliam, and Gary J. Keever

Hardy ferns are widely grown for use in the landscape. The 1998 National Agricultural Statistics Services census of horticulture reported production of hardy/garden ferns at 3,107,000 containers from over 1200 nurseries. There is little research on herbicide use in hardy ferns, and herbicides that are labeled for container production are not labeled for use on hardy ferns. Studies were conducted to evaluate the tolerance of variegated east indian holly fern (Arachniodes simplicior `Variegata'), tassel fern (Polystichum polyblepharum), autumn fern (Dryopteris erythrosora), rochford's japanese holly fern (Cyrtomium falcatum `Rochfordianum'), and southern wood fern (Dryopteris ludoviciana), to applications of selected preemergence applied herbicides. Herbicides evaluated included selected granular or liquid applied preemergence herbicides. Spray-applied herbicides were pendimethalin at 3.0 or 6.0 lb/acre, prodiamine at 1.0 or 2.0 lb/acre, isoxaben at 1.0 or 2.0 lb/acre, and prodiamine + isoxaben at 1.0 + 1.0 lb/acre. Granular-applied herbicides were pendimethalin at 3.0 or 6.0 lb/acre, prodiamine at 1.0 or 2.0 lb/acre, oxadiazon + prodiamine at 1.0 + 0.2 or 2.0 + 0.4 lb/acre, oxyfluorfen + oryzalin at 2.0 + 1.0 or 4.0 + 2.0 lb/acre, trifluralin + isoxaben at 2.0 + 0.5 or 4.0 + 1.0 lb/acre, oxadiazon at 4.0 or 8.0 lb/acre, and oxadiazon + pendimethalin at 2.0 + 1.25 or 4.0 + 2.5 lb/acre. The greatest reduction in growth of autumn fern was observed with the high rates of oxadiazon, oxadiazon + pendimethalin, and oxadiazon + prodiamine. Reductions in rochford's japanese holly fern growth were most severe when plants were treated with the high rate of trifluralin + isoxaben resulting in a 66% and 72% decrease in frond length and frond number, respectively. There were also reductions in frond length and number of fronds when treated with the high rate of oxadiazon + pendimethalin. There were no reductions in frond numbers on tassel fern with any herbicides tested. However, there were reductions in frond length from four of the 10 herbicides evaluated. The most sensitive fern to herbicides evaluated in 2004 was variegated east indian holly fern with reductions in frond length and number of fronds with four of the 10 herbicides tested. Southern wood fern appeared to be quite tolerant of the herbicides tested with the exception of the high rate of oxadiazon. Granular prodiamine proved to be a safe herbicide for all species tested in both 2004 and 2005. In 2005 all plants from all treatments were considered marketable by the end of the study. The durations of both studies were over 120 days giving adequate time for any visual injury to be masked by new growth. However, there was significant visual injury observed on the rochford's japanese holly fern treated with isoxaben at 60 and 90 days after treatment, which might reduce their early marketability.

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David N. Sasseville, Robert J. Kremer, Wm. Alan Bergfield, and Thourava Souissi Lincoln

Benlate 50 DF has been implicated in causing long term damage to leatherleaf ferns. Damage to leatherleaf fern including frond distortion, discoloration and growth suppression continues to occur even after two or more years following last Benlate application. Electron micrographs of affected plants roots indicate a loss of root hairs and a proliferation of associated soil bacteria on the root surface compared to healthy plants. Plants with history of continued Benlate application have extensive bacterial colonies embedded on the root surface, but these colonies were not parasitic. Lcatherleaf fern plants which only had their rhizomes dipped in Benlate at planting lacked the embedded colonies, but were extensively covered with bacteria. Bioassays of bacteria taken from the rhizoplane and rhizosphere of the these leatherleaf ferns showed that these bacteria have the ability to produce growth regulators and/or toxins which may be detrimental to plant growth when absorbed through the root. Consequently, Benlate may be influencing fern growth indirectly by modifying bacteria composition of the growing media to favor proliferation of deleterious, non-parasitic bacteria.