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( Cohen et al., 1983 ), but SLCV was recently detected with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using SLCV-specific primers in commercial melon plants in Imperial Valley (R.L. Gilbertson, pers. comm.). Cucurbit leaf crumple virus (CuLCrV) ( Guzman et al., 2000

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CPM, caused by Px , has become one of the most serious diseases of field and greenhouse cucurbits worldwide ( Krístková et al., 2009 ; McGrath, 2017 ; Sitterly, 1978 ). It is a serious fungal disease of BG ( Momordica charantia ), which is an

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are used ( Amadio, 2004 ). In Spain, a high proportion (more than 90%) of watermelon plants are grafted using the one cotyledon method ( Miguel and Maroto, 2000 ). In France, both the side insertion and the tongue approach have been used in cucurbits

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Anthracnose is a destructive foliage and fruit disease of cucurbits worldwide, particularly on cucumber, watermelon, and cantaloupe. Three fungal taxa have been implicated in the cucurbit anthracnose complex [Colletotrichum orbiculare (CO), C. magna (CM), and the putative teleomorph Glomerella cingulata var. orbiculare (GC)]. In the past 7 years we have assembled a large geographically diverse collection of cucurbit isolates that have been characterized for virulence, vegetative (heterokaryon) compatibility, and mitochondrial and nuclear DNA RFLPs. All isolates that are pathogenic on cucurbit foliage are CO, belong to one of the four VCGs, and belong to a single mtDNA RFLP haplotype. Three races of CO (1, 2, and 2B) can be distinguished by their disease reactions on cucumber (`Marketer' and `H19') and watermelon (`Black Diamond' and `Charleston Gray') differentials. Race 1 (cucumber pathogen) and race 2 (watermelon pathogen) were the most common. Examination of virulence on cucurbit fruit indicates that CM and GC are more aggressive than CO, indicating that they could primarily be fruit-rot pathogens. Race 1 and 2 have been used effectively for screening disease resistance in cucumber and watermelon. Isolates of CM, GC, and Colletotrichum spp. recovered from fruit lesions were not pathogenic or were weakly virulent on cucurbit foliage and were diverse with regard to VCGs, nuDNA, and mtDNA RFLPs. However, CM and GC were more virulent on cucurbit fruit than CO.

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Early Reports of Didymella bryoniae and Gummy Stem Blight Both Bernhard Auerswald and Karl Fuckel, working independently, described Didymella bryoniae in 1869 from specimens collected on the cucurbit Bryonia growing in Germany ( Corlett, 1981

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studies on cell structure, carpology, anatomy, development, and senescence of cucurbits and other specialty crops that are still appreciated to this day. In the late 1940s and 1950s, agricultural science in the Moldavian Soviet Socialist Republic (SSR

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. Sphaerotheca ) xanthii (Castagne) U. Braun & N. Shishkoff (also known as Sphaerotheca fusca (Fr.) S. Blumer and S. fuliginea (Schlechtend.:Fr.) Pollacci] is an important disease of cucurbit crops throughout the United States ( Zitter et al., 1996 ). The

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). Cucurbit powdery mildew (CPM) caused by Px is a serious fungal foliar disease of cucurbit production in open fields and greenhouses. Disease outbreak brings reduction in plant growth, premature foliage loss, and reduction in yield and fruit quality

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& Shishkoff (syn. Sphaerotheca fuliginea auct. p.p.) can be a severely limiting factor in cucurbit production in open fields and greenhouses. Powdery mildew can result in reduced vigor of the seedlings and, in some instances, death of the seedlings. Powdery

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) and 96% of the area planted to honeydew (6,799 ha) in 2009. They produced 84% and 94% of the yields and 78% and 93% of the value of cantaloupe ($359.1 M) and honeydew ($59.1 M) melons, respectively, in the United States ( USDA-NASS, 2010 ). Cucurbit

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