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Abstract

The correlation between each of the green fruit characters: carpel separation, firmness, and skin toughness with balloon bloating in salt stock was significant. As percentage of carpel separation increased the percentage of balloon bloating increased. As fruit firmness and skin toughness increased the percentage of balloon bloaters decreased. Firmness and skin toughness measurements on green fruit were significantly correlated with the same measurements on brine stock.

There was no significant correlation between lens bloating and any one of the three green fruit characters. The multiple correlation coefficient between carpel separation, fruit firmness, and lens bloating was significant. The regression equation of Ȳ = −1.21A −8.42B + 248.79 is useable in predicting lens bloating where A is percent carpel separation and B is firmness of green fruit. The estimate of lens bloating from use of this equation was just as reliable as the equation using all three green fruit characters.

Open Access

Abstract

Irrigation method and row spacing had a significant influence on the quality of fresh, canned, and frozen snap beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). Sprinkle irrigated fresh and canned snap beans contained more ascorbic acid than rill irrigated snap beans. Rill irrigated snap beans had more intense color, lower shear values, less turbid brine, and less drained weight loss. Canned snap beans grown in narrow rows had less drained weight loss than snap beans from wide rows. Frozen snap beans from narrow rows had more drip loss, less moisture, increased soluble solids, and increased ascorbic acid content than those from wide rows. Under the conditions of this study, rill irrigated snap beans and snap beans grown in narrow rows did have quality advantages over sprinkle irrigated snap beans and snap beans grown in wide rows.

Open Access

Abstract

Experiments were conducted during 1981 and 1982 to determine the yield and quality responses of lima bean (Phaseolus lunatus L.) cultivars to air temperatures preceding harvest. Temperature conditions and cultivars that produced large lima bean plants at blossom increased seed yields. Quality parameters of seeds after separation into maturity groups by salt brine were influenced by cultivars and air temperatures. Sugar content, green color intensity, and chlorophyll content decreased as seeds matured. Sugar contents of ‘Nemagreen’, ‘Bridgeton’, and ‘Thorogreen’ were greater than ‘Kingston’ at comparable stages of maturity. Sugar content increased when air temperatures during the period of 0–7 days preceding harvest were high. Air temperatures were most closely related to sugar content of mature seeds. Chlorophyll content was closely correlated with tristimulus chlorimeter – a value. The chlorophyll contents at all maturities were reduced by high air temperatures preceding harvest. The average temperature during the period of 7–14 days before harvest had the greatest influence on the chlorophyll content. The influence of air temperatures on chlorophyll content during this period was 3 to 4 times greater for immature (25% total solids) than for mature (35% total solids) seeds, and minimum air temperatures were more closely correlated with chlorophyll contents than were maximum air temperatures. These results indicate that quality (intensity of green color) was affected more by high air temperatures than was seed yield. Chlorophyll contents were more closely related to minimum than to maximum air temperatures, indicating that the effect of high temperature would be increased in humid areas where night temperatures are high.

Open Access

, 2014 ). Snap beans bred for processing adhere to strict pod quality requirements including sieve size (pod diameter), pod cross-sectional shape (round as opposed to oval), fiber content (low and no pod suture strings), and seedcoat color (white or pale

Free access