Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 24 items for :

  • Phytophthora capsici x
  • HortTechnology x
Clear All

Kim, 1995 ; Oelke et al., 2003 ). Phytophthora blight is caused by the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora capsici, which can infect a wide range of vegetable crops ( Crossan et al., 1954 ; Polach and Webster, 1972 ). Management of phytophthora blight

Full access

acreage and has an estimated value of over $12 million ( USDA, 2012 ). Phytophthora capsici , the causal agent of phytophthora blight, causes serious economic losses to many Solanaceae and Cucurbitaceae crops in many vegetable production regions of the

Full access

pepper varieties with tolerance to the disease phytophthora blight, whereas it is less common on more susceptible varieties ( Kline et al., 2011 ). Phytophthora blight is a soilborne disease caused by the oomycete Phytophthora capsici ( Leonian, 1922

Full access

, caused by the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora capsici , is a severe disease affecting squash and pumpkin. Originally described in 1922 after being identified on pepper [ Capsicum annum ( Leonian, 1922 )], it was first reported on cucurbits (Cucurbitaceae

Open Access

( Bowers and Mitchell, 1991 ; Ristaino, 1991 ). Irrigation or surface runoff water infested with Phytophthora capsici propagules serves as a source of secondary inoculum ( Gevens et al., 2007 ). Infected pepper plants develop irreversible wilt and plant

Full access

). Phytophthora capsici is a serious pathogen of solanaceous and cucurbit crops in many vegetable production regions of the United States ( Ristaino and Johnston, 1999 ). The crown rot phase of phytophthora blight can cause substantial economic losses on some

Full access

than rockwool ( Islam et al., 2002 ). Population densities of Phytophthora capsici , P. nicotianae , P. aphanidermatum , and P. ultimum were reduced by 76%, 80%, 32%, and 11%, respectively, when tomatoes were grown in coir compared with peat. In

Free access

Watermelon (Citrullus lanatus [Thunb.] Matsum & Nakai) fruit are affected by a number of preharvest disorders that may limit their marketability and thereby restrict economic returns to growers. Pathogenic diseases discussed include bacterial rind necrosis (Erwinia sp.), bacterial fruit blotch [Acidovorax avenae subsp. citrulli (Schaad et al.) Willems et al.], anthracnose [Colletotrichum orbiculare (Berk & Mont.) Arx. syn. C. legenarium (Pass.) Ellis & Halst], gummy stem blight/black rot [Didymella bryoniae (Auersw.) Rehm], and phytophthora fruit rot (Phytophthora capsici Leonian). One insect-mediated disorder, rindworm damage is discussed. Physiological disorders considered are blossom-end rot, bottleneck, and sunburn. Additionally, cross stitch, greasy spot, and target cluster, disorders of unknown origin are discussed. Each defect is shown in color for easy identification.

Full access

Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture 2009 Fungicides for common PA diseases in conifer nurseries. Pennsylvania Dept. Agr., Harrisburg, PA Quesada-Ocampo, L.M. Fulbright, D.W. Hausbeck, M.K. 2009 Susceptibility of fraser fir to Phytophthora capsici Plant Dis

Full access

Conserv. Genet. 11 4 1499 1513 10.1094/PD-65-688 Quesada-Ocampo, L.M. Fulbright, D.W. Hausbeck, M.K. 2009 Susceptibility of fraser fir to Phytophthora capsici Plant Dis. 93 2 135 141 Shew, H.D. Benson, D.M. 1981 Fraser fir root rot induced by

Full access