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on morphology group C. myristiciformis with section Carya and C. illinoinensis and C. aquatica with section Apocarya. Although C. myristiciformis substantially differs from the other two morphologically, it retains substantial similarity in

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. illinoinensis in its natural distribution and to analyze the relationships between anatomical features and environmental parameters of the seedstocks' site of origin (such as elevation and precipitation) along geographical gradients. Such information is

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Pecan ( Carya illinoinensis ) is a heterodichogamous, monoecious, and deciduous nut-bearing tree species in the Juglandaceae family indigenous to North America ( Sparks, 2005 ). Among the 18 species in the genus Carya , only the pecan is now a

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.10.035 Zhang, R. Peng, F. Liang, Y. Hao, M. Li, Y. 2015c Flowering and pollination characteristics of Chinese-grown pecan ( Carya illinoinensis ) Acta Hort. 1070 43 51 Zhao, Y. Chen, M.Y. Storey, K.B. Sun, L.N. Yang, H.S. 2015 DNA methylation levels analysis in

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L). IV. Development of a quantitative model of the translocation of nitrogen to the grain Plant Physiol. 71 7 14 Singanusong, R. Mason, R.L. D'arcy, B.R. Nottingham, S.M. 2003 Compositional changes of Australia-grown Western Schley pecans [ Carya

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In vivo pollen tube growth of pecan [Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh.) K. Koch] was estimated to be ≈ 150 μm·hour-1 from 3 to 8 hours postpollination. Pollen tubes averaged 47, 194, 405, and 946 μm after 2, 3, 4, and 8 hours postpollination, respectively. Pollen tube growth was strongly influenced by temperature, and in vitro studies demonstrated pollen germination and tube growth were optimal at 27C for `Cape Fear' pecan. In in vivo studies, tubes of cross-pollen did not grow significantly faster than tubes of self-pollen. Pollen tubes of water hickory [C. aquatica (Michx. f.) Nutt.] grew significantly faster than those of C. illinoinensis. Bitternut [C. cordiformis (Wangenh.) K. Koch] and mockernut hickory (C. tomentosa Nutt.) pollen tubes grew significantly slower on pecan stigmas than did pecan pollen. Pollen arriving first on the stigma has a decided advantage for fertilization success of pecan. The fertilization success rate of pecan pollen arriving 24 hours after first pollen arrival was <3%.

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Genetic variation among pecan [Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh.) C. Koch] cultivars was studied using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers. Using a combination of primers, a unique fingerprint is presented for each of the pecan genotypes studied. The genetic relatedness between 43 cultivars was estimated using 100 RAPD markers. Genetic distances, based on the similarity coefficient of Nei & Li, varied from 0.91 to 0.46, with an average value of 0.66 among all cultivars. The phenetic dendrogram developed from cluster analysis showed relatively weak grouping association. However, cultivars with known pedigrees usually grouped with at least one of the parents and genetic similarity estimates appear to agree with known genetic relationships.

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ohridella ) on reproduction in Aesculus hippocastanum Trees (Berl.) 17 383 388 10.1007/s00468-003-0249-z Thompson, T.E. Grauke, L.J. 1991 Pecans and other hickories ( Carya ) Acta Hort. 290 839 904 U.S. Department of Agriculture 2008 Official soil series

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Putative resistance to the blackmargined aphid (Monellia caryella Fitch) in `Pawnee' pecan [Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh.) K. Koch] was first noted in greenhouse tests by rating cultivars for relative amounts of honeydew on adaxial leaf surfaces. This resistance was confirmed in two field tests monitored from mid-June to mid-October. `Pawnee' supported significantly lower aphid populations during every rating period when relatively large numbers of these insects were present. `Navaho' also showed resistance, with `Desirable' having intermediate resistance and `Stuart' being very susceptible. Insect populations were also monitored on the four quadrants of each tree, with quadrant effect being significant in only one test. This test had the highest populations on the western quadrant and lowest populations on the eastern quadrant. In determining individual clone resistance, it is recommended that the general orchard aphid infestation level be determined so that only two or three well-timed clonal ratings are needed. We also recommend that all sides of the tree be monitored.

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Yields and economic returns above treatment variable costs were determined for young `Desirable' pecan [Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh.) C. Koch] trees grown for nine seasons under ten combinations of orchard floor management practice and irrigation. Orchard floor management practices were 1) no weed control, 2) mowed, 3) total weed control with herbicides, 4) grass control only with herbicides, or 5) disking, and trees were either irrigated or nonirrigated. Total weed control with herbicides increased cumulative yield through the ninth growing season by 358% compared to no weed control. In the humid environment where this experiment was conducted, irrigation did not increase crop value obtained from the young trees, except for 1 year. At the end of the ninth season, total weed control with herbicides was the only treatment to have a positive net present value. These data indicate that establishment costs for young `Desirable' pecan trees can be recovered as early as the eighth growing season if competition from weeds is totally eliminated.

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