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1010 10.2144/96206st01 Cai, G. Leadbetter, C.W. Muehlbauer, M.F. Molnar, T.J. Hillman, B.I. 2013 Genome-wide microsatellite identification in the fungus Anisogramma anomala using Illumina sequencing and genome assembly PLoS One 8 11 e82408 doi: 10

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). European hazelnut production has been attempted in the eastern United States since colonial times. However, the relatively cold climate—and more significantly, an endemic disease called EFB caused by Anisogramma anomala —made these attempts futile

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-ranked United States represents 3.4% of the world's hazelnuts ( Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, 2009 ). One threat to Oregon's hazelnut industry is the fungal disease EFB caused by the pyrenomycete Anisogramma anomala . The fungus is an

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causal organism of EFB is Anisogramma anomala , an obligate biotrophic ascomycete that is endemic to eastern North America ( Johnson and Pinkerton, 2002 ). In nature, A. anomala coexists with american hazelnut ( C. americana ), occasionally producing

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5 years, while older orchards of Barcelona and Ennis are removed when they are heavily diseased and no longer productive. The pathogen Anisogramma anomala causes the disease EFB on susceptible trees of C. avellana . This fungus is endemic to the

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, 2013 ). Ninety-nine percent of U.S. production comes from the Willamette Valley of Oregon. The lack of commercial hazelnut production in the eastern United States is largely the result of the disease EFB caused by the fungus Anisogramma anomala

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filbert blight, incited by the pyrenomycete Anisogramma anomala , is a serious threat to Oregon’s hazelnut industry. The fungus is native to the eastern United States where it occasionally produces small cankers on the wild american hazelnut. The fungus

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in the eastern United States have been made for more than 100 years, but the disease eastern filbert blight (EFB), caused by the fungus Anisogramma anomala , has continually hindered such efforts ( Capik and Molnar, 2012 ; Fuller, 1908 ; Johnson

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from Oregon State University (OSU) have been planted. Eastern filbert blight (EFB), caused by the pathogen Anisogramma anomala , is the most destructive disease of hazelnut in Oregon. The pathogen is endemic to eastern North America, where it

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Eastern filbert blight (EFB), caused by Anisogramma anomala (Peck) E. Müller, is a devastating disease to european hazelnut (Corylus avellana L.) orchards in the Willamette Valley of Oregon. Selection OSU 408.040 showed no symptoms or signs of the fungus following greenhouse inoculations, and enzyme-linked immunosorbant assays (ELISAs) were negative. Segregation ratios in three progenies indicate that a single dominant gene controls the resistance. A total of 64 amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) primer combinations were screened using three resistant and three susceptible individuals as well as the parents of the cross OSU 245.098 × OSU 408.040. Primer combinations that showed no more than one recombinant in these six seedlings were investigated in 30 additional seedlings. Markers that showed <15% recombination with resistance were amplified in the remaining seedlings of the population. Five AFLP markers linked in coupling to resistance were identified. B2-125 was located on one side of the resistance locus at a distance of 4.1 centimorgans (cM), while A4-265 (9.2 cM), C2-175 (5.9 cM) and D8-350 (2.5 cM) were on the other side, and A8-150 cosegregated with resistance. Three of these markers (B2-125, C2-175, and D8-350) were also linked in coupling in a similar order in seedlings from a second progeny. These markers may be useful in marker-assisted selection for eastern filbert blight resistance from hazelnut selection OSU 408.040.

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