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hazelnut industry is threatened by the disease eastern filbert blight (EFB) caused by the pyrenomycete Anisogramma anomala (Peck) E. Müller. The fungus, an obligate biotroph with a 2-year life cycle ( Pinkerton et al., 1995 ), causes severe stem cankers

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Anisogramma anomala (Peck) E. Müller is the incitant of the disease eastern filbert blight (EFB), which causes severe cankering, branch dieback, and the death of most European hazelnuts, Corylus avellana L. It is an obligate biotrophic

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threatened by eastern filbert blight (EFB) incited by the pyrenomycete Anisogramma anomala (Peck) E. Müller. The fungus is endemic on the American hazelnut ( C . americana Mill.) in eastern North America. On susceptible European cultivars, it causes

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Eastern filbert blight (EFB), incited by the fungus Anisogramma anomala (Peck) E. Müller, is an endemic disease of the wild American hazelnut, Corylus americana Marsh. The fungus is found associated with C. americana throughout its native

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Eastern filbert blight, caused by the ascomycete fungus Anisogramma anomala , is an endemic disease of the wild American hazelnut, Corylus americana . This pathogen is associated with C. americana throughout its native range, which spans much of

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world’s hazelnuts. One of the threats to Oregon’s hazelnut industry is the fungal disease EFB caused by the pyrenomycete Anisogramma anomala (Peck) E. Müller. The fungus is an obligate biotroph with a 2-year life cycle ( Pinkerton et al., 1995 ) that

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made since colonial times to produce hazelnuts in the eastern United States with little recorded success. It was eventually understood that the fungal disease eastern filbert blight (EFB), caused by Anisogramma anomala , an obligate biotrophic

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in Oregon in 2009 produced ≈37,188 t of hazelnuts on 12,545 ha. In the mid-1980s, EFB, caused by the fungus Anisogramma anomala (Peck) E. Müller, was discovered in Oregon's main hazelnut-producing region. The blight has slowly spread and is now

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`Gasaway' hazelnut (Corylus avellana L.) is highly resistant to eastern filbert blight caused by Anisogramma anomala (Peck) E. Muller. Progeny produced from controlled crosses of `Gasaway' with five susceptible genotypes and open pollination in a `DuChilly' orchard were planted in a diseased orchard and rated for symptom expression for 9 to 10 years. All progeny were found to segregate 50% resistant: 50% susceptible, indicating that `Gasaway' is heterozygous for a single dominant resistance gene.

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Resistant cultivars are a promising disease control method for eastern filbert blight, which is devastating hazelnut production in Oregon. In 1990, two studies were begun to evaluate the relative resistance of European hazelnut (Coyhls avellana) genotypes to the causal fungus, Anisogramma anomala. A randomized block design of 40 genotypes was planted using inoculated trees planted in the borders as the disease source. The first- and second-year disease incidence (percent) were compared to the published disease incidence (percent) based on exposing potted trees of 44 genotypes to high doses of inoculum. Disease incidence was significantly correlated between the two studies in 1991 (r =0.41, P = 0.02) and in 1992 (r =0.64, P = 0.001; rs = 0.35, 0.025 < P < 0.050). Three genotypes, however, showed no disease in the field, but they had disease in >70% of the potted tree study. A plot of disease incidence in the field planting indicates that the inoculum was present throughout the blocks.

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