Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 19 items for :

  • "urban forest" x
  • HortTechnology x
Clear All

, p. 281–323. In: C.C. Konijnendijk, N. Kjell, T.B. Randrup, and J. Schipperijn (eds.). Urban forests and trees. Springer-Verlag, Berlin/Heidelberg, Germany Smith, D.H. Malone, D.C. Lawson, K.A. Okamoto, L.J. Battista, C. Saunders, W.B. 1997 A national

Full access

Project compared how cool roofs and urban forests affected temperatures in the city and found the greatest benefits of lowering temperature in neighborhoods with mesic landscaping and 25% tree canopy cover compared with bare neighborhoods without tree

Full access

The United States environmental horticulture industry, also known as the Green Industry, is comprised of wholesale nursery and sod growers; landscape architects, designers/builders, contractors, and maintenance firms; retail garden centers, home centers, and mass merchandisers with lawn and garden departments; and marketing intermediaries such as brokers and horticultural distribution centers (re-wholesalers). Environmental horticulture is one of the fastest growing segments of the nation's agricultural economy. In spite of the magnitude and recent growth in the Green Industry, there is surprisingly little information regarding its economic impact. Thus, the objective of this study was to estimate the economic impacts of the Green Industry at the national level. Economic impacts for the U.S. Green Industry in 2002 were estimated at $147.8 billion in output, 1,964,339 jobs, $95.1 billion in value added, $64.3 billion in labor income, and $6.9 billion in indirect business taxes, with these values expressed in 2004 dollars. In addition, this study evaluated the value and role of urban forest trees (woody ornamental trees); the total output of tree production and care services was valued at $14.55 billion, which translated into $21.02 billion in total output impacts, 259,224 jobs, and $14.12 billion in value added.

Full access

regions has been used in past studies to show the value of the urban forest on crime ( Snelgrove et al., 2004 ) and childhood asthma ( Pilat et al., 2012 ), future studies should perhaps focus on one individual MSA observing people’s relationship to tree

Free access

plant? Acta Hort. 790 179 184 Kennedy, C.B. Zube, E.H. 1991 Attitudes towards vegetation in a desert urban forest: Creating a sense of place J. Arboriculture 17 159 166 Krejcie, R.V. Morgan, D.W. 1970 Determining sample size for research activities Educ

Full access

aesthetically poor gave reasons pertaining to lack of naturalness. Wolf (1996) also explained that research has revealed that urban forests also provide a more satisfying quality of life for urban residents. With findings such as these that indicated a

Full access

trees and the urban forest. 23 Mar. 2014. < http://www.sustainablecitiesinstitute.org/topics/water-and-green-infrastructure/urban-forestry > Sheppard, S.R.J. 2005 Landscape visualization and climate change: The potential for influencing perceptions and

Full access

: Invasion of the urban forest and the threat to North America’s ash resource J. For. 104 3 118 124 Santamour, F.S. Jr 1990 Trees for urban planting: Diversity, uniformity, and common sense Metropolitan Tree Improvement Alliance Proc. 7 57 65 Spaulding, H

Full access

such as tree structure into their teaching. The students’ positive reaction to this instruction supports our conclusion that youth can grasp and successfully apply technical arboricultural concepts and become caring stewards for our urban forests, even

Full access

urban forester/tree warden charged with the day-to-day care of community trees, the most important limiting factor relative to successful tree planting and urban forest management are the resources required to acquire and plant street trees ( Stobbart

Free access