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Squash ( Cucurbita pepo L.) is one of the most nutritive and delicious vegetables; its origins are central Mexico, Peru, and the United States ( Kathiravan et al., 2006 ). Squash belongs to the family of Cucurbitaceae and genus of Cucurbita

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`Pavo', a commercially grown, virus-susceptible squash (Cucurbita pepo L.) hybrid, and two experimental virus-resistant transgenic squash hybrids, XPH-1719 and XPH-1739, were tested for field performance. The two transgenic squash hybrids possess the desired fruit and plant characteristics of their parental line, `Pavo', plus resistance to zucchini yellow mosaic virus and watermelon mosaic virus 2 (XPH-1719), and resistance to zucchini yellow mosaic virus, watermelon mosaic virus 2, and cucumber mosaic virus (XPH-1739). Percent emergence and days to flowering were similar among the three hybrids. XPH-1719 and XPH-1739 were equally effective in producing a high percentage of quality marketable fruit and yields with 90% and 13,800 kg·ha–1 and 87% and 16,500 kg·ha–1, respectively. XPH-1719 and XPH-1739 demonstrated their outstanding virus resistance over `Pavo' by producing only 3% and 14% symptomatic plants, respectively, compared to 53% for `Pavo'. They also produced the lowest percentage of infected fruit, 0% and 7%, respectively, with `Pavo' at 26%.

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Squash silverleaf (SSL) disorder is an economically important physiological disorder affecting squash ( Cucurbita pepo L.) throughout the United States, the Caribbean region, and Israel ( Cardoza et al., 1999 ). It is characterized by silvering

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Squash (Cucurbita pepo L.) cultivars are monoecious. A phenotypically sensitive gynoecious line, NJ34, was developed through crosses of 3 monoecious inbreds and selection for increasing number of pistillate flowers in plants of several filial generations. NJ34 consists of female and predominantly-female plants under conditions favoring strong male expression. Predominantly-female plants differentiate sporadically 1–3 staminate flowers. The proportion of females is estimated at over 50% with a potential increase of up to 100% under conditions favoring strong female expression. The data show: 1) that NJ34 is later in time of flowering than its monoecious parents, 2) that its females can be converted into monoecism by spraying with an aqueous solution of 250 ppm GA3, and 3) that this line carries gene B for precocious fruit pigmentation.

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. argyrosperma (formerly C. mixta ), and C. ficifolia . Cucurbita cultivars are categorized as summer or winter squash. Summer squash is eaten immature when tender and seeds are small and soft. Winter squash is generally eaten when rind and seeds are fully

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A need exists for the introduction of a high quality, large fruited butternut squash (Cucurbita moschata Duch ex Poir) stable for fruit shape.

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Summer squash, including yellow squash and zucchini, are a major vegetable produced in the southeastern United States. In 2019, 7.1 million pounds of summer squash valued at $219.9 million were grown on 43,500 acres in the United States ( USDA

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Summer squash (Cucurbita pepo L.) cultivars were compared for ability to set parthenocarpic fruit. Some cultivars set no parthenocarpic fruit and others varied in the amount of fruit set when not pollinated. The degree of parthenocarpy varied with season, but the relative ranking of cultivars for parthenocarpy was generally similar. Cultivars with the best parthenocarpic fruit set were of the dark green, zucchini type, but some cultivars of other fruit types also set parthenocarpic fruit. A summer squash cultivar was developed that combines a high rate of natural parthenocarpy with multiple disease resistance. Yield of summer squash plants grown under row covers that excluded pollinating insects was as much as 83% of that of insect-pollinated plants in the open.

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Butternut squash (Cucurbita moschata Duch ex Poir.) is one of the most popular types of winter squash grown in the United States. Most Butternut squash is unstable for fruit shape and mutation to crookneck fruit occurs at a high frequency. Seed stocks need to be rogued frequently in order to keep the no. of crookneck and dimorphic plants at a low level. Two cultivars, small fruited ‘New Hampshire Butternut’ (NHBN) and large fruited ‘Waltham Butternut’, stable for fruit shape have been introduced. The fruit of the former cultivar is considered to be too small for general use. ‘Waltham Butternut’ has attractive fruit shape and high yield, but is considered to have a different flavor and texture than older butternut cultivars. The purpose of my breeding program was to develop a medium size butternut squash free of the crookneck rogue and with a flavor and texture similar to ‘Butternut 23’ (Asgrow Seed Co.).

Open Access