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Xiongwen Chen and Hua Chen

production of Chinese Torreya with time. So far, few studies have been conducted to analyze the dynamics of seed production for this important tree species at a community level. The reproduction of Chinese Torreya is a lengthy process. The development of male

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Janine R. Conklin and James C. Sellmer

herbaceous species ( Wilson and Mecca, 2003 ). The immediate value of cultivar evaluation for seed production is the ability to advise the green industry of problem cultivars and possible replacements ( Wheeler and Starrett, 2001 ). The replacements may

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Myrtle P. Shock, Clinton C. Shock, Erik B.G. Feibert, Nancy L. Shaw, Lamont D. Saunders, and Ram K. Sampangi

fernleaf biscuitroot seed production. Halictus sweat bees and Apis honeybees have been observed in production stands of fernleaf biscuitroot in Ontario, OR. In nature, there are other bees that specialize in pollinating fernleaf biscuitroot (Jim Cane

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Clinton C. Shock, Erik B.G. Feibert, Alicia Rivera, Lamont D. Saunders, Nancy Shaw, and Francis F. Kilkenny

their seed in agricultural settings, as wildland collections are expensive and generally inadequate to meet revegetation needs. For most forb species where seeds are in demand for restoration use in the Intermountain West, guidelines for seed production

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Clinton C. Shock, Erik B.G. Feibert, Alicia Rivera, Lamont D. Saunders, Nancy Shaw, and Francis F. Kilkenny

burning and provide nectar for recovering bee populations by the first or second year after fire (B. Love and J.H. Cane, personal communication). Commercial seed production of Dalea spp. and Astragalus spp. is needed for use in rangeland restoration

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Clinton C. Shock, Erik B.G. Feibert, Alicia Rivera, Lamont D. Saunders, Nancy Shaw, and Francis F. Kilkenny

about the cultural practices required for seed production of these plants ( Shaw and Jensen, 2014 ). Several members of the genus Lomatium , including L. dissectum (fernleaf biscuitroot), L grayi (Gray’s biscuitroot), L. nudicaule (barestem

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Daniel J. Cantliffe

Encyclopedia of Seed Production of World Crops A. Fenwick Kelly and Raymond A.T. George. 1998. John Wiley & Sons, 605 Third Ave., New York, NY 10158-0012. 403 p., incl. index. $250.00, hardback. ISBN 0-471-98202-4.

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Christian Andreasen, Andrius Hansen Kemezys, and Renate Müller

temperate zones, seed production for Gerbera hybrids must take place in heated glasshouses, but in a subtemperate climate, production may take place in fields or under partly protected field conditions ( Dufault et al., 1990 ). High seed quality and uniform

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Robert L. Meagher Jr., Rodney N. Nagoshi, James T. Brown, Shelby J. Fleischer, John K. Westbrook, and Carlene A. Chase

release in 1983 ( Rotar and Joy, 1983 ; later identified as developed from PI 468956, Wang et al., 2006 ). Seed production in the tropics is good; however, because of this cultivar’s flowering response to short days, seed production is generally poor in

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Daniel I. Leskovar and A. Kipp Boales

Seed production systems for daikon or Chinese winter radish (Raphanus sativus L., Longipinnatus Group) were investigated in the Winter Garden of southwest Texas in 1992 and 1993. Planting dates ranged from October through March. Bed configurations (number of rows × bed spacings) were 2 × 0.96 m, 2 × 1.93 m, 3 × 1.93 m, and 4 × 1.93 m. Within-row spacings were 5, 10, and 15 cm. Crops were grown using minimum fungicide and insecticide amounts, while no attempt was made to control weeds chemically. Seed was harvested between May and June. Seed yields (kg·ha–1) increased for planting dates of October to November. Lower seed yields from the January or later plantings appear to be related to increased disease and insect pressures. Total and medium class size (≥3 and ≤4 mm in diameter) seed yields were highest at 40 rows × 1.93 m bed spacings and 10 cm within-row plant spacings. Germination and percent coatless seeds were unaffected by bed configuration and within-row plant spacings. The closest within-row spacings (5 cm) increased the risk of plant lodging and delayed plant maturity.