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  • Journal of the American Society for Horticultural Science x
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Oil tea, an important edible oil tree species of Camellia , along with olive ( Olea europaea ), oil palm ( Elaeis guineensis ), and coconut ( Cocos nucifera ), are the four major woody oil species ( Yang et al., 2016 ). Oil tea has been cultivated

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treat typhoid in Iran ( Souri et al., 2008 ). Crushed and compressed seeds when applied on the skin prevent wrinkles ( Pieroni et al., 2004 ). Seeds are narcotic and the seed oil is used in treating rheumatism ( Mallik et al., 2013 ). Plant seed oils are

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Abstract

Pectic substances in 4 avocado cultivars were determined as anhydrouronic acid (AUA) during ontogeny and related to fruit maturity, alcohol-insoluble solids (AIS), alcohol-soluble solids (ASS), ASS minus oil, total oil, fresh weight and dry weight. The concentration of pectic substances in avocado pulp varied among different cultivars and increases during growth and maturation. AUA varied between 0.7 to 1.5% on a fresh weight basis. However, values on a dry weight basis are relatively constant at about 5.0% and independent of the state of maturity or cultivar. AIS, ASS, alcohol-soluble acid and oil increase as the fruit mature, ASS minus oil and water content decreased during the growth and maturation periods. Changes in oil content during ontogeny was the only constituent of those examined which was related to maturity.

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the Theaceae family, is native only to China. Camellia oil can be extracted from C. oleifera seeds, which have been used in China for more than 1000 years ( Ruter, 2002 ). The polyunsaturated and good phenolic content of camellia oil is up to 80

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from several species of the Cucurbitaceae family ( Achigan-Dako et al., 2008 ; NRC, 2006 ), it is often used in reference to egusi watermelon. The plants cultivated for their oil and protein-rich seeds are currently classified as C. lanatus ssp

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Acer truncatum is a versatile oil-producing woody tree. It is well-known for its colorful leaves and high value as an ornamental, medicinal, and oil plant ( Ma et al., 2005 , 2020 ; Yang et al., 2017 ). In 2011, the seed oil was approved as a New

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Abstract

Leaf number, area and chlorophyll content, and specific leaf weight were greater in light-exposed spurs of ‘Hartley’ walnut (Juglans regia L.) than those grown in the shade. Starch content increased early in the season in shaded spurs, but the accumulation ceased while the nuts stored dry matter. In exposed spurs, starch increased steadily until harvest. After harvest, starch level decreased in exposed and shaded spurs. Light intensity did not affect percentage composition of spurs and fruit with respect to carbohydrates or oil content in kernels. Increased exposure to light resulted in higher percentage of return bloom, greater spur growth, and more pistillate flowers per spur the following season.

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Environmental factors such as rainfall may reduce the efficacy of foliar-applied soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merrill] oil in reducing pest mortality. Greenhouse studies were conducted to investigate the influence of rain on the retention of soybean oil and the influence of soybean oil and rainfall on surface morphology of apple [Malus sylvestris (L.) Mill var. domestica (Borkh.) Mansf.] and peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch (Peach Group)] leaves and stems. `Contender' peach and `Golden Delicious'/Malling 27 apple trees were grown in 19 L pots in a greenhouse (23 ± 9 °C) and sprayed with soybean oil (1%) emulsified with the adjuvants Latron B-1956 or K1. Twenty-four hours after treatment, the trees were subjected to simulated rainfall of 0.0, 0.25, 1.25, or 2.54 cm. A negative linear relationship existed between rainfall and oil retention. Peach leaves receiving 0.25, 1.25, and 2.54 cm rainfall retained 81%, 38%, and 18% of the applied oil, respectively. Oil retention by apple leaves was also negatively related to rainfall. For both species, a negative linear relationship existed between oil retention on stems and rainfall. There was no effect of emulsifier on retention of 1% soybean oil after rain on apple leaves or on the retention of 8% to 11% soybean oil on the stems of apple and peach. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that epicuticular wax occurred as striations on apple and peach leaves. The wax morphology on peach and apple stems appeared as thin plates and platelets, respectively. The wax morphology of leaves and stems of both trees was not affected either by the soybean oil emulsions or rain. Both emulsions induced stomatal closure in leaves and peach stems, however, stomates opened after rainfall of 1.25 or 2.54 cm. The lenticels appeared to be unaffected by either emulsion. Results illustrate that rainfall of 2.54 cm washed off a major portion of the applied oil. Thus, respraying may be needed under natural climatic conditions with rainfall ≥2.54 cm to restore the efficacy of applied soybean oil.

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Field and laboratory experiments were conducted during the summers of 2001 and 2002 in two locations in Nova Scotia to identify the effect of cultivar, transplanting date, and drying (air-drying and freeze-drying) on basil (Ocimum basilicum `Mesten' and `Italian Broadleaf', and O. sanctum `Local') productivity and oil quality in Nova Scotia and to identify the potential of growing basil as a cash crop in this region. Results suggested that all of the tested cultivars of basil grown in Nova Scotia had acceptable yields and composition for the international commercial market. Greater yields (ranging from 3.6 to 19.8 t·ha-1) were achieved from `Mesten' and `Italian Broadleaf' by earlier transplanting. `Local' had a lower oil content compared to the other cultivars. Linalool was the main component of `Mesten' oil, linalool and methyl chavicol were the main components of `Italian Broadleaf' oil, while elemene and α-humulene were the main components of `Local' oil. Both air-drying and freeze-drying were found to alter the composition of the essential oil from O. sanctum and O. basilicum.

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Ethephon was applied at 0, 625, 1250, 1875, and 2500 m·gliter-1 in 2 consecutive years to `Arbequina' olive trees to determine its effect on fruit removal with mechanical harvesting and on fruit oil composition. Ethephon increased the mechanical harvesting efficiency by 20%. Ethephon at 1250 and 1875 mg·liter-1 were the optimum treatments, resulting in 63% and 66% of the olives being mechanically harvested, respectively, with a preharvest olive drop of 10% and 11%. Leaf drop (4.6 and 4.8 kg/tree fresh weight, respectively) at these concentrations did not reduce flowering the following year. Oil acidity, peroxide value, and fatty acid composition were affected little by ethephon and the values observed were within the range of normal annual variation. These results suggest that ethephon did not modify oil quality and that its use on traditionally pruned `Arbequina' trees is not economically justifiable. Chemical name used: (2-chloroethyl)phosphonic acid (ethephon).

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