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to too many hours of high temperature ( Malik and Bradford, 2006 ). Cultivar selection is critical for successful fruit and oil production, because cultivars differ in the chilling requirement to break floral bud dormancy ( De Melo-Abreu et al., 2004

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et al., 2011 ). More than 300 different cultivars ( Barranco et al., 2005 ; Muñoz-Diez, 2008 ) have been found and have been progressively included in the Olive World Germplasm Bank (OWGB) in Cordoba, Spain. In 1994, the International Olive Oil

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from the environment, and often have low toxicity to mammals ( Bainard et al., 2006 ). An essential oil that has been investigated for use as a pesticide against multiple pathogens and pests is derived from the clove plant. Clove oil has demonstrated

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In recent years, the increasing consumption of olive oil has boosted the planting of intensive and superintensive orchard systems to achieve competitive production costs ( Arbonés et al., 2014 ). Continuous mechanical harvesting is a key management

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Olive has been grown traditionally for centuries in countries of the Mediterranean basin. However, the increase in olive oil consumption related to the perception of its health-related benefits ( Waterman and Lockwood, 2007 ) has led, in the last

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Insecticidal soap and horticultural oil have been used since the late 1800s to manage soft-bodied insect pests of fruits, shade trees, and ornamental plants ( Weinzierl, 2000 ). Insecticidal soaps are made of a potassium salt of a plant

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., 2004 ; Johnson et al., 2012 ). Common conclusions drawn from these studies were that none of the essential oil herbicides provided any residual weed control, small weed size was critical for maximum efficacy, environmental conditions affected herbicide

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The goal of this study was to evaluate potential alternatives to endosulfan for control of the blueberry bud mite (Acalitus vaccinii), because the availability of this acaricide may be restricted in the future. Laboratory evaluations of potential acaricides showed that endosulfan and a combination of abamectin plus oil provided 97% and 100% control, respectively. Pyridaben and fenpropathrin were less effective, reducing mite survival by 49% and 57%, respectively. Further laboratory evaluation of the abamectin plus oil treatment showed that each component applied alone provided a high level of control of blueberry bud mite. Field trials in Michigan on a mature highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum) planting were conducted to compare control of this pest by postharvest applications of endosulfan, delayed-dormant application of oil, or a combination of both treatments. The oil provided a 40% reduction in mite scores, while endosulfan was more effective (48%) and similar to the combination of endosulfan and oil (52%). A separate field trial using a multifan/nozzle sprayer that applied the pesticide in 233.8 L·ha-1 (25 gal/acre) of water suggested that the level of control from one application of endosulfan was not as effective as two applications. Results are discussed in relation to developing future bud mite control programs in blueberry and the need to address gaps in our understanding of the biology of blueberry bud mite. Endosulfan (Thiodan 50 WP), Endosulfan (Thiodan 3 EC), Abamectin (AgriMek 0.15 EC), Fenpropathrin (Danitol 2.4 EC), Pyridaben (Pyramite 60 WP).

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An experimental steam distillation unit has been designed, built, and tested for the extraction of essential oils from peppermint and spearmint. The unit, using a 130-gal (510-liter) distillation tank, is intermediate in size between laboratory-scale extractors and commercial-sized distilleries, yet provides oil in sufficient quantity for industrial evaluation. The entire apparatus-a diesel-fuel-fired boiler, extraction vessel, condenser, and oil collector-is trailer-mounted, making it transportable to commercial farms or research stations. Percentage yields of oil per dry weight from the unit were slightly less than from laboratory hydrodistillations, but oil quality and terpene composition were similar.

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In five experiments with `Redchief Delicious' and one with `Braeburn', oxamyl (Vydate 2L) was used alone or combined with other chemicals to thin apples. The thinning response to oxamyl depended on dose. In most cases, oxamyl at 600 mg·L−1 and carbaryl at 900 mg·L−1 thinned trees similarly, but the combination of oxamyl plus carbaryl was no more effective than either chemical alone. The combination of oxamyl plus NAA (2.5 to 5 mL·L−1) was slightly more effective than either material alone. The thinning response to oxamyl and carbaryl was related to the concentration of superior oil added to the spray solution; for both chemicals, adding oil at 5 mg·L−1 or Tween 20 at 1.25 mL·L−1 gave equivalent thinning. Apples on trees sprayed with oxamyl plus oil had a dull finish. Adding Tween 20 at 1.25 mL·L−1 improved the thinning activity of carbaryl (Sevin XLR-Plus) more than oxamyl. Similar thinning occurred whether oxamyl was applied when fruit diameter averaged 4 or 10 mm. On `Braeburn' oxamyl, carbaryl, Accel, and NAA were mild thinners, but all combinations of oxamyl or carbaryl plus Accel or NAA overthinned the trees without improving fruit size. In general, oxamyl at 600 mg·L−1 (2 pints of vydate 2L/100 gal.) and carbaryl thin apple trees similarly, and the efficacy of both chemicals is improved by adding a surfactant.

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