Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 57 items for :

  • "indole-3-butyric acid" x
  • HortTechnology x
Clear All

1. Effect of indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) concentration (0, 30, 60, and 90 mg·L −1 ) and cuttings type (softwood and semihardwood) on cutting survival (CS), rooting, number of roots (NOR), dry weight of roots (DWR), and root length (RL) of ‘Yabukita

Full access

. A representation of the two-factor indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) formulation × IBA concentration interaction. Root and shoot quality are presented on a 0–4 relative scale for ‘I3’ hemp stem cuttings, with 4 being the best quality. A rating of 0 for

Open Access

Frangipani (Plumeria hybrid `Donald Angus') cuttings immersed in hot water (49C for 10 min) followed by 0.8% indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) basal treatment (hot water + IBA) had greater root length and weight compared to the nontreated control, hot water, or IBA treatment alone. Greater percentage of rooting and number of roots per cutting were observed for hot-water-treated + IBA-treated cuttings compared to the non-treated control and hot-water treatment alone. In a second study, Dracaena fragrans (L.) Ker-Gawl. `Massangeana', D. deremensis Engl. `Warneckii', D. deremensis Engl. `Janet Craig', D. marginata Lam., and cape jasmine (Gardenia jasminoides Ellis) cuttings displayed results similar to those observed with Plumeria cuttings. In addition to enhancing rooting, hot water + IBA also stimulated the number of shoots per cutting on anthurium (Anthurium andraeanum Andre `Marian Seefurth'), croton [Codiaeum variegatum (L.) Blume var. pictum (Lodd.) Mull. Arg.], D. marginata, D. fragrans, Plumeria, and ti (Cordyline terminalis `Ti') cuttings.

Full access

cuttings treated with 0, 1000, or 3000 ppm (μg·g −1 ) indole-3-butyric acid applied via a talc dip or a foliar spray ( n = 7). The leftmost column contains the four root response metrics, each with the factors analyzed in the model: block, auxin rate

Full access

et al., 2004 ), but no data are available for the propagation of this rootstock by hardwood cuttings. Many external factors such as cutting length and diameter, applied indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) concentration, date of cutting collection, and

Free access

In five experiments, singlenode cuttings of `Red Cascade' miniature rose (Rosa) were treated with a basal quick-dip (prior to insertion into the rooting substrate) or sprayed to the drip point with a single foliar application (after insertion) of Dip `N Grow [indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) + 1-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA)], the potassium salt of indole-3-butyric acid (K-IBA), or the potassium salt of 1-naphthaleneacetic acid (K-NAA); a single foliar spray application of Dip `N Grow with and without Kinetic surfactant; or multiple foliar spray applications of Dip `N Grow. Spray treatments were compared with their respective basal quick-dip controls {4920.4 μm [1000 mg·L-1 (ppm)] IBA + 2685.2 μm (500 mg·L-1) NAA, 4144.2 μm (1000 mg·L-1) K-IBA, or 4458.3 μm (1000 mg·L-1) K-NAA}. Cuttings sprayed with 0 to 246.0 μm (50 mg·L-1) IBA + 134.3 μm (25 mg·L-1) NAA, 0 to 207.2 μm (50 mg·L-1) K-IBA, or 0 to 222.9 μm (50 mg·L-1) K-NAA resulted in rooting percentages, total root length, percent rooted cuttings with shoots, and shoot length similar to or less than control cuttings. Exceptions were cuttings sprayed with 0 to 2.23 μm

(0.5 mg·L-1) K-NAA, which exhibited shoot length greater than the control cuttings. Addition of 1.0 mL·L-1 (1000 ppm) Kinetic organosilicone surfactant to spray treatments resulted in greater total root length and shoot length. Repeated sprays (daily up to seven consecutive days) had no or negative effects on root and shoot development.

Full access

top in Feb. 2014 were trimmed to 12 cm long. Auxin [1-naphthalene acetic acid (NAA), indole 3-butyric acid (IBA), and indole 3-acetic acid (IAA)] powders (Sigma-Aldrich, Shanghai, China) were dissolved in a small amount of ethanol (analytical reagent

Free access

from each plant were recorded and the stock plants were hedged to a height of 20 cm. Cuttings were stripped of leaves 2 cm above the base and a fresh cut made before treatment with 1000 mg·L −1 indole-3-butyric acid (Hormodin 1; OHP, Mainland, PA

Full access

cuttings from the first collection date that received 15,000 mg·L −1 K-IBA were diminished. Fig. 1. Mean rooting percentages, root ratings, and root lengths of sweetgale in response to potassium salt of indole-3-butyric acid (K-IBA) concentration and

Open Access

-dip in auxin [indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) + 1-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA)] in three experiments initiated during winter. z Rooting results support prior observation by Dirr and Heuser (1987) that Heller’s japanese holly may be successfully propagated

Full access