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Abstract

Injury to ‘Prelude’ and ‘Manhattan II’ perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) was measured as percentage of electrolyte leakage from leaf segments after stress to determine the influence of prestress growth temperature and poststress temperature on heat tolerance. The temperature required to cause 50% cell solute efflux was 59.5°C for ‘Prelude’ and 56.5° for ‘Manhattan II’, when measured immediately after stress treatment. However, electrolyte leakage increased with time after termination of stress. When measured 24 hr after termination of stress, 52° caused 50% cell solute efflux from leaf segments of both cultivars. Injury levels 44 hr after 30 min at 50° were ≈ 12% and 89% when incubated at poststress temperatures of 7° and 35°, respectively. Incubation temperature following a 55° treatment did not affect electrolyte leakage rate in either cultivar. Greater injury occurred in both cultivars when grown at 25° than at 41°.

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al., 2008 ). Heat tolerance is a complex trait that varies with the severity of stress and plant growth stage. Therefore, there is a need to identify heat-tolerant carrot germplasm with stable growth and yield under high temperature at various stages

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the present-day transition zone ( National Assessment Synthesis Team, 2000 ). Thus, understanding the mechanisms of heat tolerance is increasingly important for turfgrass breeders and managers. Cellular membranes, which are selectively permeable

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[ Trifolium repens ( Li et al., 2019 )]. Sitosterol reinforces the stabilization of liquid-disordered membranes in plants exposed to heat stress ( Dufourc, 2008 ). Sitosterol content correlated positively to heat tolerance of hard fescue, as demonstrated by

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activities were associated with the differences in heat tolerance of turfgrasses and indicated a positive correlation between chlorophyll content and the antioxidant enzymes and a negative correlation between membrane injury index and the antioxidant enzymes

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xanthophyll) led to decreased membrane permeability and protected the plants against heat damage ( Havaux et al., 1996 ). The association of antioxidant effects of carotenoids with improved heat tolerance in cool-season grass species is not yet well

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leaves ( Ecke et al., 2004 ). However, the effects of high temperatures on poinsettia morphology have not been adequately studied. Heat tolerance can be improved by genetic selection as well as by the use of exogenous regulators, which aid in the

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). Physiological disorders have an important G × E interaction that breeders must take into considerations when designing breeding strategies to improve heat tolerance in lettuce ( Jenni and Hayes, 2010 ; Jenni and Yan, 2009 ). The genetic basis of heat tolerance

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measuring electrolyte leakage from leaves of plants at different temperatures. Several studies have indicated that CMT is effective in detecting genetic differences with regard to heat tolerance among several crops ( Islam et al., 2014 ; Kumar et al., 2012

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Schmidt, 2000 ). Oxidative stress and differential antioxidant system activity were two key factors that contributed to differences among cultivars of creeping bentgrass in heat tolerance ( Liu and Huang, 2000 ). In addition to the antioxidant system, the

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