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researched. Heat stress often decreases the uptake of nutrients in plant tissues or decreases the total content of nutrients in the plants, although effects can vary among nutrients and species ( Giri et al., 2017 ). Hungria and Kaschuk (2014) reported that

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, and their leaves turned chlorotic and yellow ( Fig. 1A and B ). Most F 2 plants were sensitive to heat, and leaves died after wilting ( Fig. 1C and D ). Fig. 1. Phenotype analysis of before and after heat stress (HS). ( A and B ) L-9, A-16, and F 1

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fixation ( Pollock et al., 1993 ). Accordingly, heat stress negatively impacts agricultural crop production and product quality. Lobell and Field (2007) reported that over the last two decades, warming temperatures have caused annual losses of ≈40 million

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on how to manage heat stress of bell peppers grown inside high tunnels. High tunnels are protected agricultural structures or hoop houses, but they are not greenhouses, although in much of the international literature high tunnels are referred to as

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tolerance between warm-season and cool-season plant species ( DiPaola and Beard, 1992 ; Fry and Huang, 2004 ). Nutrient deficiency under heat stress has been observed in various cool-season turfgrass species, which may largely contribute to growth

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Drought and heat stress are the two most detrimental environmental stresses for cool-season turfgrass growth in arid and warm climatic regions. Turfgrass plants develop various mechanisms in their adaptation to drought or heat stress, including

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Tomato ( Solanum lycopersicum L.) is influenced by some abiotic stresses that have a major impact on fruit quality and yield. Heat stress impacts the crop in several ways, including disruption of pollen development and viability, fertilization

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survival of plants ( Berry and Bjorkman, 1980 ; Seemann et al., 1984 ). Heat stress can cause morphological, physiological, and biochemical changes that reduce photosynthetic efficiency, plant growth, and productivity ( Ashraf and Harris, 2013 ). Leaves

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negative effects are exacerbated in semi-arid and tropical areas. Of particular interest are the effects induced by short occurrences of extremely high temperatures, which are also known as heat stress (HS) events ( Teixeira et al., 2013 ). Peaks of high

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vitamin A. It is an important cool-season crop that demonstrates optimum growth and sustainable production under low-temperature regimes i.e., 18 to 22 °C ( Rubatzky et al., 1999 ). Heat stress is the most adverse abiotic constraint that significantly

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