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causal agent of foliar blight, root rot, fruit rot, and crown rot disease syndromes in cucurbits ( Babadoost, 2016 ). Phytophthora crown rot is particularly prevalent in fields prone to flooding, often resulting in total crop loss. Consequently, current

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grafted in March or April when stock plants are dormant, a busy season for Christmas tree growers. Efforts to identify alternative grafting dates have been unsuccessful ( Hibbert-Frey et al., 2010 ). Origin of scion material within the tree crown might

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, 2004 ; Hwang and Kim, 1995 ). Phytophthora capsici causes fruit, crown, and root rot as well as foliar blight ( Babadoost, 2004 , 2005 ; Babadoost and Zitter, 2009 ; Hausbeck and Lamour, 2004 ). Phytophthora crown rot is particularly severe

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× ananassa Duch.) crowns outperformed California-sourced crowns in each year from at least one Canadian-sourced location ( Tanino, 2002 ; Tanino et al., 2006). Because the highest prices of marketable strawberry fruit occur in the first 2 months of fruiting

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-infested with C. acutatum and drip-irrigated; 3) non-infested and sprinkler-irrigated; and 4) non-infested and drip irrigated. Mother plants were thawed, infested when indicated by a 5-min dip of the roots and crowns in a suspension of 2.5 × 10 5 C. acutatum

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described ( Paris, 1986 ), which includes pumpkin, cocozelle, vegetable marrow, zucchini, acorn, scallop, crookneck, and straightneck. Phytophthora capsici can infect C. pepo at any growth stage and is capable of causing crown rot, foliar blight, and

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The oomycetous pathogen, Phytophthora capsici Leonian, is capable of causing several disease syndromes in cucurbits, including crown rot, foliar blight, and fruit rot ( Roberts et al., 2001 ; Zitter et al., 1996 ). Crown rot appears at the soil

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Abstract

Dipping asparagus crowns (Asparagus officinalis L.) in 300 ppm dikegulac (Atrinal) solution significantly reduced the time of emergence and the height of asparagus shoots without affecting their fresh and dry weights. The number of shoots at complete emergence was not affected by the dikegulac treatment, but thereafter a significant increase occurred. Of the concentrations tested (0, 200, 300, and 400 ppm), 300 ppm was the most effective. After the top was cut off, the dikegulac treatment did not affect the time of emergence of the second shoots, but it did continue to increase their number. Chemical name used: 2,3:4,6-bis-O-(1-methylethylidene)-α-L-xylo-2-hexulofuranosonic acid (dikegulac).

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on squash and pumpkin fruit can develop make growers vulnerable. Specifically, in Michigan, fruit rot of processing cucurbits can be a major issue ( Hausbeck and Lamour, 2004 ; Meyer and Hausbeck, 2012 ) as well as crown and root rots of squash and

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Abstract

Asparagus is generally propagated by seed and occasionally by crown division. Crowns are usually formed underground at the base of stem (1, 2, 3, 4). To our knowledge, the formation of crowns at above-ground nodes and plant development therefrom has never been reported. Occurrence of such crowns opens the way to a rapid means of vegetative propagation. Here we describe the morphology of aerial crown formation and subsequent development of these crowns into apparently normal plants.

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