Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 133 items for :

  • "bacterial spot" x
  • HortScience x
Clear All

Bacterial spot is a major disease of tomato ( Solanum lycopersicum ) in Florida and worldwide ( Jones, 1991 ; Jones et al., 2004 ). The disease is associated with four species of Xanthomonas : X. euvesicatoria , X. vesicatoria , X. perforans

Free access

Abstract

Field studies were conducted over three seasons to determine the effect of N and K on susceptibility of tomato to bacterial spot. A factorial randomized complete block design consisting of four rates of N (167, 334, 501, and 668 kg·ha–1) and three rates of K (334, 668, and 1335 kg·ha–1) were used. Liquid fertilizer was injected via trickle irrigation. Increasing N rates reduced disease severity, whereas the effect of increasing K was inconsistent from season to season. The concentration of N in leaf tissue showed a significant negative correlation with disease severity, whereas the concentration of Ca in leaf tissue exhibited significant positive correlation with disease severity and negative correlation with N rate during two seasons of data collection.

Open Access

Bacterial spot of pumpkin, incited by X. cucurbitae (ex Bryan) Vauterin et al. (1995) [syn. Xanthomonas campestris (Pammel) Dowson pv. c ucurbitae (Bryan) Dye], has become one of the most important diseases of pumpkin [ Cucurbita pepo L. and

Free access

Bacterial spot of tomato ( Solanum lycopersicum L.) was first identified in South Africa ( Doidge, 1921 ). Originally, bacterial spot was thought to be caused by only one species, Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria ( Stall et al., 1994

Open Access

Abstract

All possible crosses, excluding reciprocals, among 3 bacterial-spot-resistant plant introductions of pepper and the susceptible ‘Yolo Wonder’ were evaluated for resistance in the F3 along with the backcross (BC) F2s derived from backcrosses to the susceptible cultivar. PI 322719 carries a single dominant gene for resistance that is independent of the one carried by PI 163192. The resistance of PI 163189 is more complex; it is independent of the resistance of PI 322719 but may be associated with that of PI 163192. Nonsegregating, resistant families were recovered in the F3s of all crosses and backcrosses.

Open Access

Abstract

Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) accession PI 270248 (‘Sugar’) had high levels of resistance to bacterial spot [incited by Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Doidge) Dye] on fruit, but foliage was susceptible. Hawaii 7998 (H7998) was highly resistant to foliar infection, but was intermediate in resistance to fruit infection. Fruit spot on hybrids between ‘Sugar’ and H7998 was usually intermediate to the parents. Occasionally, disease incidence of hybrids was not statistically different from one or both parents, but tended to resemble ‘Sugar’ more closely than H7998. There were no significant differences between reciprocal hybrids, indicating a lack of cytoplasmic inheritance. Under low disease incidence, hybrids between ‘Sugar’ and ‘Walter’ (susceptible to bacterial spot on fruit and foliage) had fruit spot incidence similar to ‘Sugar’ and significantly less than ‘Walter’. Thus, there was a high level of dominance for resistance to bacterial spot on fruit.

Open Access

A `spray-inoculation seedling screening procedure was developed for detecting resistance to Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Doidge) Dye, causal agent of bacterial spot of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.). Two-week-old transplants were preconditioned under 95% humidity for 16 hours before spray inoculation and then rated for bacterial spot 2 weeks later. Resistant plants could also be distinguished from susceptible genotypes using a modified bacterial speck [Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Okabe) Young, Dye, and Wilkie] screening procedure (cotyledon-dip technique). When results of both screening methods were compared to field ratings from three previous seasons, significant correlations were more frequently observed for the spray-inoculation method. In Summer 1991, individual plants were evaluated by the spray-inoculation technique and then were placed in the field to determine susceptibility under field conditions. Correlations (r = 0.28 to 0.34) between spray-inoculation seedling screening ratings and field ratings, although low, were significant (P ≤ 0.0001). More than 90% of susceptible plants could be eliminated, saving labor, space, and time.

Free access
Authors: and

Abstract

Two hundred eight-four Lycopersicon spp. genotypes reported to have some resistance to bacterial pathogens of tomato (L. esculentum Mill.) were inoculated in the field with Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (XCV), the incitant of bacterial spot, and rated for disease severity in summer 1982 and/or summer 1983. One line tested in 1983, Hawaii 7998, had no definite XCV lesions and later was determined to be resistant to XCV in the laboratory. Genotypes with the highest levels of resistance during 2 years of testing were: Ohio 4013-3, Ohio 4014-4, Heinz 1568-F3, [(Subarctic Delite × MH1) × H603] F5, L556, ‘Campbell-28’, PI 127813, Heinz 603-F11, PI 224573, ‘Monense’, ‘Heinz 2990’, and PI 324708. Genotypes with highest levels of resistance in one year of testing were PI 379032 and ‘Burgess Crack Proof. In 1982, PI 270248- ‘Sugar’ had a high level of resistance to XCV on fruit, but foliage was susceptible.

Open Access

Bacterial spot is a devastating disease affecting all market classes of field-grown tomato ( Solanum lycopersicum ) produced in humid regions. Breeding for resistance to this disease is complicated because bacterial spot is caused by four species of

Open Access

A mixture of host-range mutant (h-mutant) bacteriophages specific for tomato race 1 (T1) and race 3 (T3) of the bacterial spot pathogen, Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Doidge) Dye was evaluated for biological control of bacterial spot on `Sunbeam' tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) transplants and field-grown plants for two seasons (Fall 1997 and Fall 1998). Foliar applications of bacteriophages were compared with similar applications of water (control) and of copper/mancozeb bactericides, the commonly used chemical control strategy for tomato seedling and field production. In 1997, the incidence of bacterial spot on greenhouse-grown seedlings was reduced from 40.5% (control) to 5.5% or 0.9% for bactericide- or bacteriophage-treated plants, respectively. In 1998, the incidence of bacterial spot was 17.4% on control plants vs. 5.5% and 2.7% for bactericide- and bacteriophage-treated plants, respectively, although these differences were not statistically significant at P ≤ 0.05. Applications of bacteriophages to field-grown tomatoes decreased disease severity as measured by the area under the disease progress curve (AUDPC) by 17.5% (1997) and 16.8% (1998) compared with untreated control plants. Preharvest plant vigor ratings, taken twice during each field season, were higher in the bacteriophage-treated plants than in either bactericide-treated plants or nontreated controls except for the early vigor rating in 1998. Use of bacteriophages increased total weight of extra-large fruit 14.9% (1997) and 24.2% (1998) relative to that of nontreated control plants, and 37.8% (1997) and 23.9% (1998) relative to that of plants treated with the chemical bactericides. Chemical names used: manganese, zinc, carboxyethylene bis dithiocarbamate (mancozeb).

Free access