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  • Journal of the American Society for Horticultural Science x
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the large number of Prunus species with diverse origins and ornamental traits, the most widely cultivated flowering cherry trees planted in the United States represent only a few species, primarily P. serrulata , P. subhirtella , and P. yedoensis

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geographic regions and scion nature. The Prunus genus is a highly diverse group of woody plants belonging to the Spiraeoideae subfamily of the Rosaceae family ( Potter et al., 2007 ). Many species of this genus are economically important because they are a

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Peach ( P. persica ) and other stone fruit ( Prunus sp.) scions are grafted onto rootstocks that serve as the foundation for tree architecture. Rootstocks also play primary roles in plant health by providing resistance to soilborne diseases and

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Prunus (Rosaceae) is a large genus with significant economic importance, since it includes a variety of popular stone fruit species [e.g., peach ( Prunus persica ), apricot ( Prunus armeniaca ), almond ( Prunus dulcis ), and sweet cherry ( Prunus

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Peach ( Prunus persica ) was domesticated several thousand years ago in China and subsequently introduced to Persia, the Mediterranean, the Americas, and elsewhere ( Faust and Timon, 1995 ). Cultivars selected for cool dry climates generally do not

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“Yoshino cherry” in a survey of Ueno Park, Tokyo, Japan. In 1900, it was renamed “Somei-yoshino cherry” to distinguish it from the mountain cherries of Yoshino, Nara Prefecture, Japan ( Kuitert, 1999 ). Its scientific name was initially given as Prunus

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domains structure map of DELLA proteins. ( B ) Gene structure maps of PmDELLA1 and PmDELLA2 . ( C ) Multiple alignments results of the deduced amino sequences of DELLA in Prunus mume (PmDELLA1 and PmDELLA2), Malus × domestica ( MdRGL1a , MdRGL2a

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sequence identity with SOC1 homolog genes in Rosaceae Prunus plants such as PaSOC1 [apricot ( Prunus armeniaca ); 98% identity], PpSOC1 [peach ( Prunus persica ); 95% identity], and PsSOC1 [plum ( Prunus salicina ); 95% identity]. However, PmSOC1-2 and

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Flower buds of 20 Prunus species showed quite different strategies to cope with low temperatures. Buds of most species deep supercooled. The two hardiest species, both from the subgenus Padus (P. padus L. and P. virginiana L.), did not supercool and survived -33C with no bud kill. Prunus serotina J.F. Ehrh., also in Padus, did supercool. Prunus nigra Ait., P. americana Marsh, P. fruticosa Pall., and P. besseyi L.H. Bailey had a low minimum hardiness level (MHL), small buds, and a low water content. Exotherms were no longer detectable from the buds of these species after 2 days at -7C and some buds survived -33C. Prunus triloba Lindl. and P. japonica Thunb. were similar to that group, but no buds survived -33C. Prunus davidiana (Carriere) Franch., P. avium L., and P. domestica L. had a relatively high MHL but hardened rapidly when the buds were frozen. Prunus persica (L.) Batsch., P. subhirtella Miq., P. dulcis (Mill) D. A. Webb, and P. emarginata (Dougl. ex Hook) Walp. deep supercooled, had large flower buds and a high MHL, and were killed in the Dec. 1990 freeze. Prunus salicina Lindl., P. hortulana L.H. Bailey, P. armeniaca L., and P. tomentosa Thunb. were in an intermediate group with a moderately low MHL and a moderate rate of hardiness increase while frozen. Prunus dulcis and P. davidiana had a low chilling requirement and bloomed early, whereas P. virginiana, P. fruticosa, P. nigra, and P. domestica had high chilling requirements and bloomed late.

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Prunus mume belongs to the family Rosaceae, subfamily Prunoideae, and was cultivated in China more than 3000 years ago for its ornamental qualities and its fruit ( Chen, 1996 ). As an early-blooming garden ornamental, mei is widely cultivated in

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